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By Alison Knezevich and Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2012
Maryland's Board of Elections has acknowledged sending out some incomplete absentee ballots and some with incorrect address information, but officials say both problems were limited in scope and have been resolved. A handful of voters in Montgomery and Prince George's counties received ballots that did not include a page with some of the state's controversial referendum questions - including whether to allow same-sex marriage, expand gambling and extend in-state tuition discounts to some illegal immigrants.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
After the first day of counting absentee ballots on Thursday, a winner had not yet been determined in a Republican primary race for the Anne Arundel County Council. At the close of the first absentee canvass, Michael Anthony Peroutka held a 16-vote lead over Maureen Carr-York in District 5, which includes Severna Park, Arnold and Broadneck. Incumbent Councilman Dick Ladd remained in third. Peroutka had 2,287 votes to Carr-York's 2,271 votes, according to election data. A total of 1,791 provisional ballots and remaining absentee ballots will be counted next week.
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NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2010
The Maryland League of Conservation Voters has mailed 130,000 absentee ballot applications to registered voters — an effort that could prove beneficial to Democratic Gov. Martin O'Malley and other candidates endorsed by the environmental advocacy group. The applications were expected to begin showing up in mailboxes Tuesday. The mailing and follow-up phone calls and e-mails represent the largest voter outreach effort by the Maryland group. In 2006, the league sent out applications and postcards to 70,000 voters.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich and Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
The results from the primary election have left several local races without resolution, and on Thursday local boards of election will begin counting absentee ballots to decide winners and losers. In Baltimore County, the contest to pick a Republican who will face incumbent Democrat County Executive Kevin Kamenetz in November was too close to call after the close of polls Tuesday. With more than 20,000 votes cast between them, George Harman, a retired program manager for the state Department of the Environment, had a 22-vote lead over Tony Campbell, a political science professor at Towson University who once served as chairman of the county Republican Party.
NEWS
October 18, 1992
Registered voters who are unable to make it to the polls on Nov. 3 -- Election Day -- are eligible to vote by absentee ballot. Here's how to do it:* Non-emergency requests: Deadline for absentee ballot requests is Tuesday, Oct. 27. Applicants can either apply in person at the local elections board or send a letter to the board requesting a ballot. Due to time constraints, the letter is considered the application. The letter should contain the name and address of the registered voter, the address where the ballot should be mailed, and the reason why the voter will be unable to make it to the polls.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2010
In a race tighter than expected, longtime Anne Arundel County State's Attorney Frank Weathersbee was leading his Republican challenger, Eric Grannon, by nearly 4,000 votes, as more than 7,000 absentee ballots were being counted Thursday and Friday. Grannon, 38, an attormey whose private practice largely handles antitrust and business matters, would have to garner more than 75 percent of the votes cast in absentee and provisional ballots to unseat Weathersbee, 66, who has 22 years on the job. "We're pretty confident that the absentee votes will fall the way the precincts have," Weathersbee said Thursday.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Staff Writer | April 2, 1992
City housing officials have filed criminal charges against 15 property owners accused of violating a law requiring absentee landlords to pay a $10-per-unit registration fee.The 15 alleged violators face potential court fines as high as $10,000. The city enacted the registration law in 1981 as a way of locating absentee landlords who had been charged with housing code violations such as failing to provide tenants with heat or hot water.Robert Dengler, acting director of housing inspection services, said the city's prosecution of a small number of recalcitrant landlords tends to bring forward others who haven't registered.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 16, 2004
JERUSALEM - Like most American citizens living in Israel, Steven Shnider didn't cast a ballot in the last presidential election four years ago. Neither did Stuart Schnee, although he is an avid follower of politics back home. This year, both men are voting, and thousands of others here are expected to follow suit. Nowhere overseas does the dominant issue of this campaign - how to make America safe from terrorism - resonate more than with people living in Israel, where Palestinian suicide bombings targeting civilian buses and cafes are routine, and residents feel they are on the front lines of what has become a global war. "This election is a much more critical one," said Shnider, who grew up in Maryland but voted this year in New Hampshire, his last official U.S. address.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2013
After elections officials spent more than 24 hours reviewing and counting absentee and provisional ballots, Republican newcomer Mike Pantelides was named winner of the Annapolis mayoral election Friday night. Going into the count of provisional ballots Friday, Pantelides held onto a 50-vote lead over incumbent Democratic Mayor Josh Cohen. When the 65 provisional ballots were run through a scanner as an anxious crowd watched, 37 were for Pantelides and 28 were for Cohen, making Pantelides the winner by 59 votes out of nearly 8,000 cast.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF Contributing writer Kayce Ataiyero provided information for this article | September 16, 1998
Former Gov. William Donald Schaefer took a step forward in his political comeback last night, winning the Democratic nomination for state comptroller. But a tight race to determine his Republican opponent will not be decided until absentee ballots are counted.Schaefer, returning to politics after a restless retirement, won an easy victory in yesterday's primary to earn a spot on the Nov. 3 general election ballot -- the first comptroller's race in four decades without political legend Louis L. Goldstein's name on the ballot.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
The National Federation of the Blind has sued Maryland election officials, charging that their April decision not to approve a system that would make it easier for disabled people to cast absentee ballots privately violates federal law. The Baltimore-based federation filed suit this week asking the U.S. District Court to order the State Board of Elections to provide that technology in time for the June 24 primary election. "The right to a secret ballot that can be filled out privately and independently is just as important to people with disabilities as it is for other voters," said federation spokesman Chris Danielson.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2014
Maryland's top elections official expressed confidence Friday that the state will deliver absentee ballots to voters smoothly and on time despite a change in plans ordered just two months before the June 24 primary. The State Board of Elections decided this week not to move forward with a system that would have allowed voters who receive an absentee ballot through the Internet to mark their choices on a computer screen before printing the ballot and mailing it in. Linda H. Lamone, administrator of the elections board, said the agency will do what is needed to comply with the decision of the five-member panel.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2014
The future of a system that would let voters download absentee ballots before mailing them in was cast into doubt Thursday when the State Board of Elections refused to move forward with part of the plan amid fears it would open the door to widespread fraud. The five-member panel declined to certify a system for marking the ballots on a computer screen despite assurances from its staff that the system was secure and ready to be used in this year's June primary and November general elections.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green and By Erica L. Green | March 24, 2014
A Baltimore city councilwoman is calling on school system leaders to reconsider using a disciplinary tool against more than one-third of principals in order to improve student attendance, saying it takes an entire community to get students to school. Mary Pat Clarke, head of the council's education committee, introduced a resolution Monday that requests more information about the school system's attendance issues and the rationale behind a recent plan that has 61 principals facing pressure to improve attendance in the last few months of the school year.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2014
Nearly one-third of Baltimore principals are facing disciplinary action over high student absenteeism, drawing the ire of a union leader who has fired back that parents are the problem, not schools. Baltimore schools interim CEO Tisha Edwards said 61 principals will be placed on performance improvement plans because their schools have large percentages of students who are at-risk for being chronically absent — missing more than 20 days in an academic year — by the end of the school year.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2013
After elections officials spent more than 24 hours reviewing and counting absentee and provisional ballots, Republican newcomer Mike Pantelides was named winner of the Annapolis mayoral election Friday night. Going into the count of provisional ballots Friday, Pantelides held onto a 50-vote lead over incumbent Democratic Mayor Josh Cohen. When the 65 provisional ballots were run through a scanner as an anxious crowd watched, 37 were for Pantelides and 28 were for Cohen, making Pantelides the winner by 59 votes out of nearly 8,000 cast.
NEWS
September 17, 2006
Results from some of the more closely watched races on the Republican side of the ballot in Tuesday's primary election with 69 of 69 precincts reporting (provisional and overseas absentee ballots will be counted this week) [SOURCE: Harford County Board of Elections]
NEWS
October 29, 1992
Want to vote but can't? Get an absentee ballotRegistered voters unable to get to the polls on election day because of an emergency still can vote Nov. 3 if they obtain an emergency absentee ballot from the Election Board and return it before the polls close.The board will accept requests for emergency ballots until 8 p.m., when the polls close. It will count any emergency ballot received before then.Emergency ballot applicants must reveal under penalty of perjury why they cannot vote at their polling place on election day.Voters unable to apply for absentee ballots in person because of illness, an accident or some other emergency may designate another county registered voter as their "duly authorized agent" to apply for the ballot and return it to the Election Board.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2013
The Annapolis mayoral election was too close to call Tuesday night, with neither candidate declaring victory or conceding defeat. With 15 of 16 precincts unofficially reporting at 9:45 p.m., incumbent Democratic Mayor Josh Cohen had 3,468 votes to 3,518 votes for Republican challenger Mike Pantelides. Cohen said there were problems with one voting machine at a precinct in Ward 7. Only one of the two precincts in that ward reported results Tuesday. Annapolis elections officials said Tuesday that more than 300 absentee ballots were mailed to voters.
NEWS
October 7, 2013
I appreciated your recent editorial, "The value of showing up" (Sept. 29) because it shed some much needed light on the issue of tracking chronic absenteeism. Left unchecked, chronic absenteeism in the pre-K and kindergarten years will snowball into poor academic performance and a higher risk for dropping out of high school. The good news is that with effective interventions, research has shown that patterns of poor attendance can be reversed. The most effective strategies for reducing chronic absenteeism require collaboration between the schools, their nonprofit partners, and the parents.
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