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By Allen Barra and Allen Barra,Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2009
In the mid-1960s, the Guinness World Records claimed that more had been written about Abraham Lincoln than about any other figure in world history. As the bicentennial of his birth approaches, Lincoln has surely lengthened his lead. Here are some of the most intriguing recent volumes. Abraham Lincoln by James M. McPherson Oxford University Press / 96 pages / $12.95 At just 96 pages, this probably qualifies more as an essay than an actual biography, but if you consider it as the first book you read on Abraham Lincoln, it's a bargain.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2014
One by one, the sacred cows hit the ground, adroitly tipped over by the best-selling author Steve Berry in his 13th historical novel, "The Lincoln Myth. " Berry, 59, is a Florida-based former attorney and county commissioner turned author whose previous 12 books have sold more than 17 million copies in 51 countries. The sales are a tribute to the author's skill at folding his research into little-known historical puzzles inside murder mysteries starring Cotton Malone, a retired U.S. Justice Department operative turned book-seller.
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By Martin D. Tullai | March 4, 2001
LERONE Bennett Jr.'s interesting and provocative article, "A closer look at Honest Abe," which ran in Perspective last Sunday, offered a jaundiced view of Abraham Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation. Bennett asserted that "Lincoln did not emancipate the slaves, greatly or otherwise." This is a strange contention. Certainly, the proclamation might not have freed any slaves on Jan. 1, 1863, the day it was issued. Certainly, it is no secret that the proclamation was limited and did not go far enough for many abolitionists and congressional leaders.
NEWS
April 16, 2014
Benjamin Todd Jealous claims that Maryland "would have seceded from the Union in 1861 if not for Abraham Lincoln's last-minute decision to impose martial law and arrest 12 members of the General Assembly to prevent them from taking a vote" ( "Maryland: the new South," April 13). Neither claim is accurate. President Lincoln never imposed martial law in Maryland (nor did anyone else) and he specifically instructed the military authorities to allow the Maryland legislature to meet in special session in April 1861 without interference.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2008
Giants: The Parallel Lives of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln By John Stauffer Twelve / 432 pages / $30 Frederick Douglass didn't think much of Abraham Lincoln's assertion in 1862 that blacks were the cause of the Civil War or his plan to send as many of them as possible to the republic of Colombia. The innocent horse does not make the horse thief, Douglass fumed. It is "the cruel and brutal cupidity of those who wish to possess horses, or money, and Negroes" that ought to be blamed.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2013
The Enoch Pratt Free Library 's only document signed by Abraham Lincoln will be on display Tuesday for one day only, in honor of the Great Emancipator's 204th birthday. The document - the appointment of Walter Graham of New Jersey as the American consul at Cape Town, South Africa - will be exhibited in the main hall of the Central branch, 400 Cathedral St. between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m., according to library spokesman Roswell Encina. The appointment was signed on Jan. 19, 1863 by Lincoln and his Secretary of State, William Seward, and was donated to the Pratt in September 1940 by Mrs. William F. Bevan.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | November 17, 2013
The greatest words any American ever said were spoken by a gaunt, war-haunted man in a tiny Pennsylvania college town 150 years ago Tuesday. The celebrated orator Edward Everett had spoken first, a gusty address that began with a nod toward "this serene sky, overlooking these broad fields now reposing from the labors of the waning year," and wheezed to a close two hours later with a reference to "the glorious annals of our common country....
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2014
One by one, the sacred cows hit the ground, adroitly tipped over by the best-selling author Steve Berry in his 13th historical novel, "The Lincoln Myth. " Berry, 59, is a Florida-based former attorney and county commissioner turned author whose previous 12 books have sold more than 17 million copies in 51 countries. The sales are a tribute to the author's skill at folding his research into little-known historical puzzles inside murder mysteries starring Cotton Malone, a retired U.S. Justice Department operative turned book-seller.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | December 5, 1995
When Fort McHenry visitors aim a stumper of a question, the inquiry gets fired at the thin man who looks a lot like Abraham Lincoln.His name is Scott S. Sheads, a tall, rail-slender park ranger whose idea of a good time is to spend the night in a sleeping bag in one of the fort's old jail cells."
NEWS
By MARTIN D. TULLAI | August 30, 1992
When Ronald Reagan, in discussing fundamental values at the Republican convention, erroneously attributed to Abraham Lincoln several positive principles, he joined a long line. Abraham Lincoln -- not Yogi Berra -- is the most misquoted American.Historians have been trying for over 40 years to set the record straight on the ''Ten Cannots,'' which run as follows:* ''You cannot bring about prosperity by discouraging thrift.''* ''You cannot help small men by tearing down big men.''* ''You cannot strengthen the weak by weakening the strong.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | November 17, 2013
The greatest words any American ever said were spoken by a gaunt, war-haunted man in a tiny Pennsylvania college town 150 years ago Tuesday. The celebrated orator Edward Everett had spoken first, a gusty address that began with a nod toward "this serene sky, overlooking these broad fields now reposing from the labors of the waning year," and wheezed to a close two hours later with a reference to "the glorious annals of our common country....
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | July 22, 2013
Rand Paul is the most interesting contender for the Republican nomination. And when I say interesting, I mean that in the broadest sense. A case in point: The Kentucky senator recently hit some turbulence when the Washington Free Beacon reported that Jack Hunter, Mr. Paul's aide and the coauthor of his book, "The Tea Party Goes to Washington," was once the Southern Avenger. Who's that? Starting in the 1990s, as a radio shock jock, Mr. Hunter would wear a wrestling mask made from a Confederate flag, while making jokes about the assassination of Abraham Lincoln and having the South re-secede.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2013
Booth, the younger of two brothers in Suzan-Lori Parks' cauterizing play “Topdog/Underdog,” being given a trenchant Baltimore premiere by Everyman Theatre, is determined to perfect the old con game, three-card monte. As he rehearses his spiel before an imaginary audience of potential marks, Booth spouts a rapid-fire mantra, “You pick that card, you pick a loser.” His hands never really move quite fast enough, smooth enough, but that doesn't deter him - he's already decided to change his name to “3-Card” - or dent his contempt for all those supposed losers who will soon lay in his path.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | February 12, 2013
To mark the birthday of Abraham Lincoln , our 16th president, the Enoch Pratt Free Library is offering a look at a bit of history today. The Pratt will have a presidential appointment signed by Lincoln on display in the main hall of the Central Library downtown from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. The document is the appointment of Walter Graham of New Jersey as Consul of the United States of America at Cape Town, January 19, 1863, the Pratt said....
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2013
The Enoch Pratt Free Library 's only document signed by Abraham Lincoln will be on display Tuesday for one day only, in honor of the Great Emancipator's 204th birthday. The document - the appointment of Walter Graham of New Jersey as the American consul at Cape Town, South Africa - will be exhibited in the main hall of the Central branch, 400 Cathedral St. between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m., according to library spokesman Roswell Encina. The appointment was signed on Jan. 19, 1863 by Lincoln and his Secretary of State, William Seward, and was donated to the Pratt in September 1940 by Mrs. William F. Bevan.
EXPLORE
January 18, 2013
As we celebrate Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s birthday, we are reminded that equality is unconditional, something we basically knew from the start.  And it wasn't born out of the Great Charter of the Liberties of England, or the Magna Carta; the Declaration of Independence; the Constitution or even the Bill of Rights. Rather, as Abraham Lincoln said in the movie "Lincoln": "it was right there all the time; there in Euclid's (Father of Geometry) 'Elements,' a 2,000-year-old book of mechanical law. " In fact, Abraham Lincoln, who explored and wrestled with passage of the 13th Amendment focusing on the abolition of slavery, unflinchingly put Euclid this way in the movie "Lincoln": "Things which are equal to the same thing are equal to each other.
NEWS
May 5, 2005
The opening ceremony for a new exhibit on Abraham Lincoln is set for 6 p.m. today at the Enoch Pratt Free Library. The national traveling exhibition, Forever Free: Abraham Lincoln's Journey to Emancipation, looks at Lincoln's views on slavery and how they changed during the Civil War. The central library, at 400 Cathedral St., also plans a series of other free programs in connection with the six-week exhibit, including a living history presentation on...
NEWS
May 23, 2002
Richard D. Mudd, 101, who spent much of his life trying to overturn his grandfather's conviction on charges of aiding Abraham Lincoln assassin John Wilkes Booth, died Tuesday at his home in Saginaw, Mich. Mr. Mudd, who retired in 1965 after 37 years as a physician for General Motors Corp., traveled the nation on speaking engagements, many of them before Civil War historical organizations. He spent decades trying to clear the name of his grandfather, Dr. Samuel A. Mudd, who treated Booth after the 1865 assassination of President Abraham Lincoln at Washington's Ford's Theater.
NEWS
By David Horsey | December 11, 2012
Two new movies, "Lincoln" and "Hyde Park on the Hudson," are intimate portraits of the two most consequential presidents of the United States. They are timely reminders that politics has never been pretty and our leaders have never been prefect human beings, but that, without Abraham Lincoln and Franklin Delano Roosevelt, our country might have been lost to the disintegrating influence of lesser men. "Lincoln" is such a stunningly good movie that...
NEWS
By Doyle McManus | November 29, 2012
    In the rest of the country, it may be just another movie, but in Washington, Steven Spielberg's "Lincoln" has become a political Rorschach test. It seems as if every pundit in the capital has gone to see the masterful biopic about our 16th president, and - surprise - they all found something to support their views about contemporary politics. The analogies are hard to resist. The movie is set in the first months after Lincoln won a second term, facing an unruly lame-duck Congress.
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