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NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | April 14, 2006
What are warts and how can you get rid of them? Warts are benign growths caused by the human papilloma virus, or HPV. Because they are caused by a virus, they can spread from person to person by direct skin contact, and indirectly by coming in contact with the shed skin of a person with warts. This can happen in public showers or on pool decks. There are more than 100 types of HPV, and each type causes infection in a specific part of the body. Some strains cause "common" warts, which grow on the fingers, feet and knees.
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SPORTS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
For almost a year, the question was "if" Michael Phelps would return to competitive swimming. Now that Phelps is scheduled to end his 20-month retirement Thursday in Mesa, Ariz., a more nuanced question looms: Why? Phelps sounded fairly certain he no longer wanted to confine his life to the pool when he walked away from the sport after the 2012 Olympics. He had seemingly put the perfect exclamation point on his career, winning gold in his last race to bring his record medal haul to 22, including 18 golds.
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NEWS
By Photos by Jed Kirschbaum and Photos by Jed Kirschbaum,Sun photographer | March 26, 2007
Signs of spring abound - and melted snows are lending springtime force to the cascading waters at Lake Roland in Robert E. Lee Park. This piece of wilderness, in Baltimore County off Interstate 83, features miles of hiking and jogging trails and is a popular spot for dog walkers. To see a multimedia presentation go to baltimoresun.com/waterfall.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2014
The historic Lord Baltimore Hotel sits a block away from the Sheraton Baltimore City Center, but less than a week after the 1926 landmark celebrated a multimillion-dollar restoration, the owners of the aging Sheraton on Fayette Street warned of mass layoffs and a potential shutdown. Baltimore's hotel market is at a crossroads as investments pour into properties new and old amid a nationwide pickup in business and leisure travel. As new hotels open, older properties scramble to remain competitive in a market in which demand for rooms remains healthy but has yet to rebound to pre-recession levels.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | May 14, 2000
"Aprons: Icons of the American Home" by Joyce Cheney (Running Press, 143 pages, $24.95) With vast affection for motherhood, a collection of aprons curated by Ms. Cheney has toured 15 cities. This catalog, cleanly designed and delightfully illustrated, is a small coffee table gem. There are aprons old, and aprons way out new. Imagination, irony, ceremony, utility, ornamentation, ritual, antiquity and outrageousness abound. Apparently, the actual use of aprons is in decline -- but this book might just reverse the trend.
NEWS
By Photos by Algerina Perna and Photos by Algerina Perna,Sun photographer | October 22, 2007
During a visit in 1827, John Quincy Adams described Baltimore as "the Monumental City." Nearly two centuries years later, it is still easy to see why. Monuments abound in the city. "To the Memory of the Unknown Dead," erected by the Women's Relief Corps Auxiliary to the Grand Army of the Republic, sits in the National Cemetery. One standout statue sits at the Clifton Park golf course - "On the Trail," a statue of a Native American that was donated in 1916.
NEWS
By Vincent W. MacDonald | November 22, 1993
Oyster beds lie dormant.Open-mouthed shells abound,Headstones of days of plenty.Rotting hulls of treasured work boatsDot the sloughs,Discards of another time.Once they plied distant sounds,Harvesting nature's$ subaqueous bounties.Now, defiled, desecrated,An unfitting end, anunjust reward;Desolation abounds.When the sea was freshand fertile,Youths were eagerly followingWatery paths of rugged men.With dying time setting in,Riding pitching gunnelsIn the half-light of morning,Wet, cold, discouraged,With each lick tendering lessyield,The mind entertainssobering thoughts.
SPORTS
October 28, 2008
1 Shoot 'em up: The NBA regular season begins, and TNT has a doubleheader (Cavaliers-Celtics, Trail Blazers-Lakers) starting at 8 p.m. 2 What's it all: about, Ralphie?: Check in with our Maryland blog, baltimoresun.com/ terpsblog, to see what Ralph Friedgen has to say about his team. 3 Tournament action: Regional semifinals in field hockey abound today, including Towson at defending state champ and No. 3 Fallston (3:30 p.m.). 4 They are Marshall: Your Tuesday night college football: Houston at Marshall (8 p.m., ESPN2)
FEATURES
By Bob Kappstatter dTC | October 17, 1993
For every "champagne dream" suite, there are dozens of beer-budget flats sprinkled about, all clean, comfortable and conveniently located.In England, you can pick an apartment in fashionable Mayfair or Kensington, or find a reasonable rental near Piccadilly.Heading out to the countryside? Vacation cottage rentals abound, from Cornwall to the Cotswolds and beyond.In the mood for the posh in Paris? High-fashion apartments abound in the Right Bank. And funky Francophiles can take their pick on the Left Bank.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sun Staff | June 26, 2003
COMING UP Jazzy Summer Nights, taking place on First Thursdays through September, strikes again next week with performances by Fertile Ground (right) with Marcel and the Truth. The event takes place at War Memorial Plaza at City Hall (Fayette and Gay streets) at 5 p.m. Admission is free, lawn chairs are welcomed, and no open containers are allowed. For more information, visit www.visionary marketinggroup.com. NOW OR NEVER It's not often these days that you get to hear the music of the Beatles live.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2014
Custodians at the Church of the Redeemer have struggled this winter to keep its sidewalks clear of snow, but the one flush against North Charles Street in Homeland - buried by nearly every plow that passes - proved too much. The city issued the church a citation for failing to clear the walk. "One of our custodians has been here 30 years, and he doesn't ever recall having that happen before," said Ellen Chatard, program director at the church. It has been a snowy winter with 26.5 inches through Tuesday - nearly 10 inches more than average - and another 1 to 3 inches forecast for Wednesday morning.
NEWS
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
The concept behind the new Ruxton gallery and shop, V Fashion Towson/My Town Art Gallery, was born in the most unlikely of places: years ago, on the sidelines of a club lacrosse game. Watching her now-grown daughters play lacrosse, Valerie Heneberry was struck by a desire to celebrate her fun, active lifestyle. She knew her husband, artist Patrick Reid O'Brien, was up for the job -- and that she could help. O'Brien draws on his art education and a career in advertising to create Pop Art-inspired prints that celebrate that good life.
NEWS
November 24, 2013
Allison Knezevich's piece ( "Baltimore County Council poised to block low-income housing," Nov. 18) does a great job of showcasing the many misconceptions about low-income housing and the people who need its assistance. The views expressed by supporters of the resolution blocking the Rosedale housing project are typical NIMBYism, where communities are under the impression that the presence of participants in low-income housing programs leads to increased crime and overcrowding of schools.
EXPLORE
October 7, 2013
Harford County's premier pet event, the Walk & Wag-a-Thon and Pet Fair is Saturday, Oct.12, from 1 to 6 p.m. at the Harford County Equestrian Center, 608 N. Tollgate Road in Bel Air. The Humane Society of Harford County (HSHC) will be attempting to set a Guinness World Record for "Most Dogs Wearing the Same Bandana in One Place" and needs all dog owners and their dogs to achieve the record. Generously sponsored by Animal Emergency Hospital, the Walk & Wag-a-Thon and Pet Fair is a fun-filled afternoon for pets and pet parents alike with pet contests, raffles, vendor displays and more.
FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2013
    1.          When Madison Jacobson receives her Towson High School diploma on June 1, the celebration will just be getting started. Jacobson, who will head to Roanoke College in the fall, will continue the festivities at home the day after graduation, when her family throws her a garden-themed party. "It's Madison's launch from the nest," says Debbie Jacobson, her mother. "We are working with Lilly Pulitzer colors and pretty, picnicky food, like chicken salad with green grapes, croissants, fruit salad and sangria.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2013
In the aftermath of No. 13 Johns Hopkins' devastating 8-4 loss to then-No. 7 Loyola last Saturday, senior defenseman Tucker Durkin said the week of practice leading up to Friday night's contest at Army would be the most important one of the season. Coach Dave Pietramala said he has been pleased with the players' effort and attention to detail Monday and Tuesday. But one thing the Blue Jays are not paying attention to is their tournament profile. “We don't really talk about it because we can't control that,” Pietramala said Wednesday morning.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | October 24, 1999
The bad guys in "Les Vampires," French director Louis Feuillade's 1915 movie serial, don't suck blood, they steal jewels. And Bela Lugosi is nowhere in sight (although one of the actors looks suspiciously like him). But this 10-part, eight-hour silent journey through the streets and along the rooftops of Paris, as a nasty band of thieves (led by the sinister Irma Vep, played by Musidora of the Folies Bergere) prey on the rich and powerful, is more than eerie enough to warrant tonight's Halloween-season airing on TCM, beginning at 8 p.m.Grotesqueries abound (at one point, a box is opened to reveal ... a severed head!
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | December 2, 2001
Junk English, by Ken Smith (Blast Books, 142 pages, $12.95) In his introduction to this work of splenetic splendor, Smith writes: "Junk English is much more than sloppy grammar. It is a hash of human frailties and cultural license: spurning the language of the educated yet spawning its own pretentious words and phrases, favoring appearance over substance, broadness over precision, and loudness above all." Then he gets mad. I am entirely on his side -- and who really respects truth in communication and justice in expression cannot be?
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2013
Those stories you tell about your roommate from hell just might pay off. Live Baltimore is running a contest, offering a $100 prize package for the best worst roommate tale. A front-runner is Jennifer Anne Jobson, who talks about her freshman year roommate, who was sharpening a big knife the first time they met. One day, the girl -- who liked to eat fried chicken in bed -- took the knife to Jobson's mattress, some of her clothes, their rug and their bean bag chair. She also used it on a squirrel, which she left, dead, in Jobson's bed. Another person had a roommate that peed in the bathtub.
FEATURES
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2013
The last time Yasmin and Adil Degani bought a home, they took the traditional route. They went with a commission-based real estate brokerage to show them homes and guide them through the homebuying process. This time around, in an effort to save money and time, they decided to try an emerging path. The Odenton couple went with Redfin, a "technology-powered brokerage" that employs salaried agents and encourages buyers to use online profiles of homes to determine what properties to tour.
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