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NEWS
January 29, 2013
On Sunday, January 27, The Baltimore Sun printed an article about Planned Parenthood that was, of course, pro-abortion in slant ("Safe, legal abortion for 40 years"). In all fairness, there should have been space devoted to a pro-life article as well, especially in light of the 40th anniversary of Roe v. Wade. But you chose to ignore the more than 600,000 people who Marched for Life on Friday, January 25. And the countless others who couldn't be at the march but were there in spirit, like myself.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | May 18, 2013
It was the pictures and riveting testimony that convinced a Philadelphia jury that abortion doctor Kermit Gosnell was guilty of murdering three infants born alive following botched late-term abortions and also guilty of the involuntary manslaughter of Karnamaya Mongar, who overdosed on Demerol during an abortion at Dr. Gosnell's clinic. How ironic that the Gosnell decision was delivered the day after Mother's Day. The two-month trial has reignited the abortion debate. But while many states have managed to impose some restrictions on abortion clinics, establish informed consent laws, and in some cases require a woman to view a sonogram before aborting an unborn child, abortion on demand for almost any reason and at most stages of pregnancy remains legal in every state.
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NEWS
August 29, 2012
I was surprised and delighted to open The Sun and read an inspiring commentary on the op-ed page ("Abortion ethics not so simple," Aug. 28). Christopher Dreisbach has finally given this topic the objective, honest look it so rightly deserves. This kind of material not only credits him, but The Sun by association. The core of the piece asks us to step back and ask what makes us human and what constitutes life. These are the questions that drive those of us who are pro-life, not a wish to control others.
NEWS
January 29, 2013
On Sunday, January 27, The Baltimore Sun printed an article about Planned Parenthood that was, of course, pro-abortion in slant ("Safe, legal abortion for 40 years"). In all fairness, there should have been space devoted to a pro-life article as well, especially in light of the 40th anniversary of Roe v. Wade. But you chose to ignore the more than 600,000 people who Marched for Life on Friday, January 25. And the countless others who couldn't be at the march but were there in spirit, like myself.
NEWS
March 22, 2012
Readers such as John Rutkowski must not understand that Garry Trudeau's series on the forced ultra-sound law for women seeking abortion is no attempt at being funny ("Idiotic 'Doonesbury' strip on abortion insults readers," March 20). "Comic" strip is a misnomer for Doonesbury, which is why The Sun runs the strip on the op-ed page and not the "funnies" pages. I must also take issue with the series being a jab at all those with "some" morals and religious convictions. Apparently, those who don't feel the jab are totally lacking morals and religious scruples.
FEATURES
By Matthew Hay Brown | matthew.brown@baltsun.com | November 23, 2009
Both sides of the abortion debate will be focusing on Baltimore today, when the City Council is expected to approve a first-in-the-nation law imposing new regulations on faith-based organizations that try to steer women away from the procedure. The measure, introduced by council President Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake at the behest of Planned Parenthood of Maryland, would require that crisis pregnancy centers that do not provide abortions or birth control post signs saying so. Proponents frame the effort as a matter of public health.
NEWS
February 1, 1991
Five hours of hearings on the abortion issue yesterday changed no minds. The subject is well known to all 188 members of the General Assembly. Every delegate and senator has taken a position. In 1991, unlike 1990, legislative leaders have made it clear the matter will be voted upon in both the House and the Senate.Pro-abortion advocates have the upper hand. A majority of lawmakers seems committed to giving women the same right to an abortion in the initial stages of pregnancy that the Supreme Court stipulated in its Roe vs. Wade decision.
NEWS
January 22, 1995
Give Gov. Parris N. Glendening credit: He's not afraid of a fight. He has guaranteed a nasty one by including in his budget provisions loosening restrictions on abortions for Medicaid recipients. But it's an important fight, one that is long overdue.Only two years ago, Maryland came as close as possible to a democratic settlement of the abortion debate. Voters in November 1992 approved, 62-38 percent, a ballot measure ensuring women in Maryland would continue to have access to legal abortion, even if the Supreme Court overturned Roe vs. Wade.
NEWS
March 14, 1995
If new delegates in Annapolis thought they had gotten a good taste of the legislative process, they may want to revise their impressions later this week. The subject under consideration on the House floor tomorrow afternoon and evening is Gov. Parris N. Glendening's budget for fiscal year 1996. But the real focus of the debate falls in his courageous but controversial decision to lift restrictions on funding for Medicaid abortions.Since 1980, Maryland has allowed Medicaid funds to pay for abortions only in cases where the mother's life or health is seriously threatened, or in cases where pregnancy results from rape or incest or when the fetus is deformed.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | April 25, 2000
BOSTON -- At least they won't be showing the cartoon in the Supreme Court. For once we will hold this debate without the infamous line drawings that look straight through a woman, as if she were an invisible vessel, to the perfect Gerber baby lying within. That's been the defining image, the most graphic of graphics ever since the pro-life movement invented the phrase "partial-birth abortion" as another strike on the public opinion front. The Supreme Court prefers the Constitution to the cartoon.
NEWS
August 29, 2012
I was surprised and delighted to open The Sun and read an inspiring commentary on the op-ed page ("Abortion ethics not so simple," Aug. 28). Christopher Dreisbach has finally given this topic the objective, honest look it so rightly deserves. This kind of material not only credits him, but The Sun by association. The core of the piece asks us to step back and ask what makes us human and what constitutes life. These are the questions that drive those of us who are pro-life, not a wish to control others.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2012
Operators of abortion clinics in Maryland will have to apply for licenses and meet strict guidelines under new regulations being adopted by state health officials next month. The regulations, announced by the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene on Friday, are meant to increase oversight of surgical abortion clinics, which have faced increased scrutiny since a botched abortion at an Elkton clinic made headlines two years ago. The new rules significantly strengthen current law, which requires abortions to be performed by a licensed physician, but pose few other restrictions.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2012
The Germantown clinic featured in today's story, “ Maryland abortion protest target takes fight to protesters ,” has been a focal point of the abortion debate over the past few years. Dr. LeRoy Carhartarrived there in late 2010. That year, Nebraska had banned abortions after 20 weeks. Carhart, who performs both early- and late-term abortions, still lives in Nebraska and travels to Maryland to work at the Germantown clinic. Michael Martelli, director of the Maryland Coalition for Life, said Carhart's arrival in Maryland was a “catalyst for the … rising up and unity” of many groups that oppose abortion.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | April 8, 2012
My 16-year career in two legislatures (eight in the Maryland General Assembly and eight in Congress) included many debates on the most divisive issues of our time: Capital punishment, affirmative action, war and peace, impeachment, entitlement reform and abortion rights were guaranteed to generate partisan strife and emotional debate. No issue generated more emotion than a woman's right to choose. Intense, emotional debates produced a unique lexicon, as legislators debated the merits and implications of "judicial bypass," "parental consent," "partial birth" and the many complexities attendant to Medicaid (taxpayer)
NEWS
March 22, 2012
Readers such as John Rutkowski must not understand that Garry Trudeau's series on the forced ultra-sound law for women seeking abortion is no attempt at being funny ("Idiotic 'Doonesbury' strip on abortion insults readers," March 20). "Comic" strip is a misnomer for Doonesbury, which is why The Sun runs the strip on the op-ed page and not the "funnies" pages. I must also take issue with the series being a jab at all those with "some" morals and religious convictions. Apparently, those who don't feel the jab are totally lacking morals and religious scruples.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,matthew.brown@baltsun.com | November 23, 2009
Both sides of the abortion debate will be focusing on Baltimore today, when the City Council is expected to approve a first-in-the-nation law imposing new regulations on faith-based organizations that try to steer women away from the procedure. The measure, introduced by council President Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake at the behest of Planned Parenthood of Maryland, would require that crisis pregnancy centers that do not provide abortions or birth control post signs saying so. Proponents frame the effort as a matter of public health.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | January 11, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- The most intense abortion debate in Annapolis so far this year is not between the usual supporters and opponents. It's simmering within the abortion-rights movement as some legislators and advocate groups disagree over what shape their legislation will take.The arguments are centering on the issue of parental notice: Should a parent be told before a girl has an abortion?The question has provoked hard-fought battles in other states. Anti-abortion groups say the measure is a necessity.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | November 2, 2009
A Baltimore City Council panel is set to take a key vote today on controversial legislation that would require pregnancy clinics that don't perform abortions or distribute birth control to post signs stating just that. The legislation would affect four clinics in Baltimore. It has drawn attention from people on both sides of the abortion debate who think the city council bill could become a model for legislation in other cities and towns across the county. City Council President Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake introduced the measure after meeting with abortion rights advocacy groups.
FEATURES
By Matthew Hay Brown | matthew.brown@baltsun.com | November 23, 2009
Both sides of the abortion debate will be focusing on Baltimore today, when the City Council is expected to approve a first-in-the-nation law imposing new regulations on faith-based organizations that try to steer women away from the procedure. The measure, introduced by council President Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake at the behest of Planned Parenthood of Maryland, would require that crisis pregnancy centers that do not provide abortions or birth control post signs saying so. Proponents frame the effort as a matter of public health.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | November 2, 2009
A Baltimore City Council panel is set to take a key vote today on controversial legislation that would require pregnancy clinics that don't perform abortions or distribute birth control to post signs stating just that. The legislation would affect four clinics in Baltimore. It has drawn attention from people on both sides of the abortion debate who think the city council bill could become a model for legislation in other cities and towns across the county. City Council President Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake introduced the measure after meeting with abortion rights advocacy groups.
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