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By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | April 6, 1999
On Opening Day 1999, baseball's much-debated creation myth took another big hit, this time from way out in left field -- at Baltimore's Walters Art Gallery of all places.Baseball, in the form of two boys at play with a bat and a ball, appears in an illustration in a hand-lettered, hand-painted fragment of a 700-year-old prayer book unveiled last night at the Walters.So much for Abner Doubleday, the man popularly, if dubiously, credited with the creation of baseball in 1839. The Walters manuscript, called the Calendar of the Ghistelles Hours, dates from 1301, which any baseball statistician can tell you is a good five centuries before Doubleday laid out his first diamond in Cooperstown, N.Y.The Walters acquired the 14-page Ghistelles Calendar at auction in London in honor of Dr. Lilian M.C. Randall, curator of manuscripts at the gallery from 1974 to 1996.
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NEWS
January 12, 2013
I was overjoyed to learn that no one was nominated for entry into the Baseball Hall of Fame this year ("Voters shut out players," Jan. 10). A few nominees, including Roger Clemens, Sammy Sosa and Barry Bonds, were shunned in their first year of eligibility. I have been patiently awaiting this: We are witnessing the backlash of negativism toward former ball players who allegedly abused steroids. The really lamentable thing is that these men would have likely traipsed into the Hall without the assistance, if you will, of steroid use. Those players who used or abused steroids put themselves above the sport, and that is why I am happy to see these men suffer the consequences and futility of not gaining entry at Cooperstown.
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FEATURES
By Cathy Collison | June 15, 1998
Chuckie's bestest interviewThe Yak had a chance to interview some of the Rugrats you know so well, including Chuckie, who is a big part of the Rugrats touring show. Remember, some of these words are just how the Rugrats talk, so they don't look exactly like they are in the dictionary.Chuckie, what's it like being on stage? Do you have to practice a lot?Well, I had to practice my singin' a little bit 'cause we sing some songs. Then when I finded out there was gonna be peoples watchin' us, I had to practice not hidin' under my bed.Chuckie, you get a little scared sometimes but then do brave things.
SPORTS
By Andy Knobel | July 16, 2000
If sports corrupts language, language can also corrupt sports. It's an interesting thought, not to mention a correct use of the literary device called chiasmus - a reversal in the order of words in two otherwise parallel phrases. Never heard of chiasmus? It's the basis of a wonderfully complete and completely wonderful new book, "Never Let a Fool Kiss You or a Kiss Fool You," by Mardy Grothe, and it's as prevalent in locker rooms across the country as are cliches. Well, almost. Anyway, here are some examples from his book and Web site, www.chiasmus.
NEWS
January 12, 2013
I was overjoyed to learn that no one was nominated for entry into the Baseball Hall of Fame this year ("Voters shut out players," Jan. 10). A few nominees, including Roger Clemens, Sammy Sosa and Barry Bonds, were shunned in their first year of eligibility. I have been patiently awaiting this: We are witnessing the backlash of negativism toward former ball players who allegedly abused steroids. The really lamentable thing is that these men would have likely traipsed into the Hall without the assistance, if you will, of steroid use. Those players who used or abused steroids put themselves above the sport, and that is why I am happy to see these men suffer the consequences and futility of not gaining entry at Cooperstown.
SPORTS
By Andy Knobel | July 16, 2000
If sports corrupts language, language can also corrupt sports. It's an interesting thought, not to mention a correct use of the literary device called chiasmus - a reversal in the order of words in two otherwise parallel phrases. Never heard of chiasmus? It's the basis of a wonderfully complete and completely wonderful new book, "Never Let a Fool Kiss You or a Kiss Fool You," by Mardy Grothe, and it's as prevalent in locker rooms across the country as are cliches. Well, almost. Anyway, here are some examples from his book and Web site, www.chiasmus.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau | April 3, 1993
WASHINGTON -- As a kid in Arkansas, Bill Clinton played music, not center field. As an adult, he developed a passion for college basketball.On Monday, though, none of that matters. By virtue of being president, Mr. Clinton gets the honor of taking part in one of America's most enduring rituals. When the president throws out the first ball at Oriole Park at Camden Yards, he will inaugurate major league baseball's Opening Day and become part of a tradition that stretches back to the sport's earliest roots.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | April 10, 1997
A howling mob of stone-throwing Baltimore Rebels will be about the only thing missing from the ceremonies on Saturday celebrating the transformation of the derelict President Street Railroad Station into the Baltimore Civil War Museum.The first deaths of the Civil War occurred April 19, 1861, on Pratt Street when a crowd of mostly Southern sympathizers set upon volunteer troops from the Sixth Massachusetts Regiment who had detrained at the President Street depot of the Philadelphia, Wilmington and Baltimore Railroad.
FEATURES
By Arlene Ehrlich | November 10, 1991
Have you ever wondered where they got the design for the American flag? Or who invented baseball, or where Panama hats come from? Me neither. Like most Americans, I know that Betsy Ross designed and sewed the first American flag, that Abner Doubleday invented baseball, and that Panama hats come from the land of Noriega.And like most Americans, I'm wrong. Betsy Ross probably never sewed an American flag and certainly did not design one. Baseball originated in England, and Panama hats come from Ecuador.
SPORTS
May 8, 1994
Major League Baseball celebrates its 125th anniversary this season and if you look carefully at team rosters, you'll find no shortage of players who were on hand to catch that first ball from Abner Doubleday. On this Mother's Day, Winners and Losers takes a look at guys who might hang around long enough to share locker space with their grandsons.PLAYERS .. .. .. .. .. .. .. COMMENTLance Parrish .. .. .. .. .. No hits in three at-bats with Pittsburgh... .. .. .. .. .. .. ... ... Old catchers never die; they just shift.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | April 6, 1999
On Opening Day 1999, baseball's much-debated creation myth took another big hit, this time from way out in left field -- at Baltimore's Walters Art Gallery of all places.Baseball, in the form of two boys at play with a bat and a ball, appears in an illustration in a hand-lettered, hand-painted fragment of a 700-year-old prayer book unveiled last night at the Walters.So much for Abner Doubleday, the man popularly, if dubiously, credited with the creation of baseball in 1839. The Walters manuscript, called the Calendar of the Ghistelles Hours, dates from 1301, which any baseball statistician can tell you is a good five centuries before Doubleday laid out his first diamond in Cooperstown, N.Y.The Walters acquired the 14-page Ghistelles Calendar at auction in London in honor of Dr. Lilian M.C. Randall, curator of manuscripts at the gallery from 1974 to 1996.
FEATURES
By Cathy Collison | June 15, 1998
Chuckie's bestest interviewThe Yak had a chance to interview some of the Rugrats you know so well, including Chuckie, who is a big part of the Rugrats touring show. Remember, some of these words are just how the Rugrats talk, so they don't look exactly like they are in the dictionary.Chuckie, what's it like being on stage? Do you have to practice a lot?Well, I had to practice my singin' a little bit 'cause we sing some songs. Then when I finded out there was gonna be peoples watchin' us, I had to practice not hidin' under my bed.Chuckie, you get a little scared sometimes but then do brave things.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | April 10, 1997
A howling mob of stone-throwing Baltimore Rebels will be about the only thing missing from the ceremonies on Saturday celebrating the transformation of the derelict President Street Railroad Station into the Baltimore Civil War Museum.The first deaths of the Civil War occurred April 19, 1861, on Pratt Street when a crowd of mostly Southern sympathizers set upon volunteer troops from the Sixth Massachusetts Regiment who had detrained at the President Street depot of the Philadelphia, Wilmington and Baltimore Railroad.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau | April 3, 1993
WASHINGTON -- As a kid in Arkansas, Bill Clinton played music, not center field. As an adult, he developed a passion for college basketball.On Monday, though, none of that matters. By virtue of being president, Mr. Clinton gets the honor of taking part in one of America's most enduring rituals. When the president throws out the first ball at Oriole Park at Camden Yards, he will inaugurate major league baseball's Opening Day and become part of a tradition that stretches back to the sport's earliest roots.
FEATURES
By Arlene Ehrlich | November 10, 1991
Have you ever wondered where they got the design for the American flag? Or who invented baseball, or where Panama hats come from? Me neither. Like most Americans, I know that Betsy Ross designed and sewed the first American flag, that Abner Doubleday invented baseball, and that Panama hats come from the land of Noriega.And like most Americans, I'm wrong. Betsy Ross probably never sewed an American flag and certainly did not design one. Baseball originated in England, and Panama hats come from Ecuador.
NEWS
By Ben Krull | June 17, 2010
"Few members of the Tea Party have endorsed Rand Paul's misgivings about the Civil Rights Act of 1964, but a surprising number are calling for the repeal of … the 17th Amendment … that provides for the direct election of United States senators." The New York Times, May 31, 2010 A group of baseball fans, calling themselves Two Baggers — in honor of the game's alleged founder, Abner Doubleday — are calling on Major League Baseball to repeal its policy of having the public elect players to the All-Star Game.
NEWS
June 22, 2014
The Baltimore Orioles just completed the last leg of their road trip, having played three games against the Tampa Bay Rays at Tropicana Field ( "Kevin Gausman shuts down Rays, Nelson Cruz homers in Orioles' 2-0 victory," June 18). Both Baltimore TV and radio had nothing positive to say about Tropicana Field, the Rays' home turf in Tampa/St. Petersburg. Radio broadcaster and former Os pitcher Ben McDonald even called it "gloomy. " Can you imagine anyone ever calling Oriole Park gloomy?
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