Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAbility
IN THE NEWS

Ability

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2012
In the days leading up to Friday's final cutdown, third-year linebacker Sergio Kindle was viewed as the highest-profile Raven on the roster bubble. But Kindle survived the final round of cuts for one main reason: his ability to get after the quarterback. “Sergio's potential as a pass rusher is something that's really important,” Ravens coach John Harbaugh said Tuesday. With Terrell Suggs out with an Achilles injury and rookie Courtney Upshaw still ailing with a sprained shoulder, the Ravens didn't feel they had the luxury of getting rid of a potential pass-rush threat.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
COLLEGE PARK - The transformation took place late last season, on what started out as a dreary November afternoon at Virginia Tech's Lane Stadium. Maryland went into Blacksburg thought to be no more than road kill for the Hokies and emerged with a bit of a swagger after a 27-24 overtime victory. When the 2014 Terps make their Big Ten debut Saturday at Indiana, there is a growing confidence about playing on the road. Maryland (3-1) has won four straight true road games, including wins at South Florida on Sept.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 13, 1998
ANYONE attending the most recent meeting of the Annapolis city council might have come away confused. That wasn't a criminal enterprise the participants wanted to exterminate: It was a revenue authority."
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
If historic tax bills are wrong in the future, at least city property owners will know who to blame. The City Council voted unanimously Monday to give Baltimore's government authority to do the appraisals that determine the size of historic tax credits - essentially stripping state officials of the duty in response to errors that left some property owners with wildly inaccurate bills. The plan, which is expected to get final approval next week, ends months of finger-pointing between state and city officials over who is to blame for the problems.
BUSINESS
By New York Times | August 15, 1991
WASHINGTON -- American banks have not put up any money to finance Soviet purchases of American grain, despite the Bush administration's efforts to facilitate such loans.No American banks participated last month in a $600 million loan to the Soviet Union for grain purchases, even though the United States guaranteed repayment of almost all of the principal and half of the interest, banking and grain industry executives said.Despite the government loan guarantees, American bankers said that they were worried about the declining ability of the Soviet Union to pay its bills and that their own financial problems had limited their ability to make loans to anyone.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 8, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The United States is ill-prepared to combat a growing and "grave" threat from proliferation of nuclear, chemical and biological weapons around the world, a high-level government commission concludes.Nightmare scenarios include a disgruntled Russian scientist selling nuclear-weapons fuel to Iran, or anthrax being released in a subway at rush hour, sending 6,000 people to emergency rooms."These events have not taken place. But they could," warns the panel, chaired by former director of Central Intelligence John M. Deutch.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 2, 1998
GLENVIEW, Ill. -- Zenith Electronics Corp.'s losses widened in the fourth quarter, causing its auditors to raise "substantial doubt" about the television maker's ability to survive.Zenith said it has received enough cash from majority owner LG Electronics Inc. of South Korea to carry it through June but warned that it may seek bankruptcy protection without additional financing.Zenith shares fell $2.0625 to $4.5625.The crisis is the worst yet for the 80-year-old company, which has reported a loss every year but one since 1985 and has never recovered from a flood of low-priced Japanese televisions into the United States in the 1970s and 1980s.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | June 20, 2004
Victor J. Wightman didn't title his artworks. Not the pink and green birdhouse, not the zigzag striped deer, not the kaleidoscopic sculpture made with broken crockery and buttons. It was an unkind biological irony: The disease that led the lawyer to his artistry robbed him of his ability to explain it. "We asked him all the time," said his mother, Ursula Morgan-Kane. "We would say, `Victor, what is this?' and he would shrug his shoulders. And we would say, `Victor, what does this make you think of?
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Staff | August 14, 2005
When teachers told Cosette Nickles a decade ago that her son didn't belong in gifted-and-talented math because he didn't do extra work, she didn't push it -- even though the Perry Hall mother suspected the school was wrong. But when her youngest child wasn't flagged for the program several years later, Nickles appealed the decision, and won. She had learned from her son's experience that if her daughter wasn't doing algebra in middle school with the higher-level students, she might not make it to advanced-placement calculus in high school.
FEATURES
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,Sun Staff | September 29, 1998
ANNAPOLIS -- At St. John's College, education is an act of faith. Faith in the desire to learn and in the Great Books used to gain such wisdom. Faith in the ability to accomplish this task on your own. And faith in a system that puts its faith in students to do so.The aims at this tiny liberal arts college seem higher, purer than at most schools. Here, knowledge is pursued for its own sake. Great bodies of work are read in order to be poked, prodded and torn apart; ideas that great thinkers have expounded upon for thousands of years are re-examined and turned upside down.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | September 3, 2014
Perhaps Buck Showalter protests too much, and for once we're not talking about video replay here. Showalter looked at the big crowd of Cincinnati Reds stretching in front of the visitors dugout at Camden Yards on Wednesday and - for the umpteenth time - made his case against the unrestricted 40-man roster limit in September. "It's just a different dynamic," he said. "It's like we're playing a whole different game now. " Of course, for those who have watched for the past three years as the Orioles found creative ways to stretch their 25-man roster to the point where it sometimes looked like it contained 40 players, this might seem like a strange complaint.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
Foluke Tuakli hopped on a bicycle and weaved around her classroom at the University of Maryland, College Park, acting out the problems that cyclists encounter on the road. "I'm turning, I'm turning," she shrieked as the bike wobbled. The demonstration was part of a student pitch for a bicycle GPS app in a freshman entrepreneurship class in the honors college. Other student groups had their own pitches: a new type of sustainable drinking fountain where water is squirted directly into the mouth, a Third World slum development project, and a day care center that emphasizes healthful eating habits.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
Baltimore's City Council voted unanimously Monday to ban employers from asking about an applicant's criminal record until after a job interview  - a sweeping requirement that supporters say will make it easier for ex-convicts to get jobs. But some businesses have objected to the proposed law, arguing it would cost employers time and money spent on job candidates who aren't appropriate employees. The council amended the bill to exempt "facilities servicing minors or vulnerable adults" to address concerns that, for instance, employers would not be able to screen out sex offenders seeking jobs at day care centers.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2014
SARASOTA, Fla. - The ink has only just dried on the Orioles' monumental four-year deal with starter Ubaldo Jimenez, but the club remains interested in acquiring at least one other big-ticket free agent. The Orioles have intensified their pursuit of free-agent designated hitter Kendrys Morales and right-handed starter Ervin Santana, according to industry sources. The club has been linked to both players throughout the offseason, but did not appear to be in serious negotiations recently as Jimenez signed a four-year, $50 million deal, the largest and longest contract given to a free-agent pitcher in franchise history.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2014
Maryland has averaged almost 12 wins in each of John Tillman's three seasons, but there is some speculation that reaching that benchmark in 2014 could be a much more difficult proposition. Much of that is based on the Terps graduating attackmen Kevin Cooper and Owen Blye and midfielders John Haus and Jake Bernhardt. That's four starters who combined for 77 goals and 47 assists, accounting for 47.5 percent of last year's goals and 51.6 percent of the assists. The team also bade farewell to first-team All-American long-stick midfielder Jesse Bernhardt, short-stick defensive midfielder Landon Carr, attackman Billy Gribbin and faceoff specialist Curtis Holmes.
SPORTS
By Mike King, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2014
Robert Ogilvie spent thousands of hours in front of his television screen, watching videotapes of his figure skating students alongside those of national, international and Olympic competitors. The British-born World War II veteran, former prisoner of war and internationally renowned figure skater had settled down in Baltimore in 1960, beginning a lifelong devotion to teaching his craft. He died Nov. 18 at 97, and a memorial service will be held for him at the Cathedral of the Incarnation at 4 East University Parkway on Friday at 5 p.m. "In his teaching relationships with his students, I really think that he wanted every student to kind of actualize all their potential in skating," said Robin Williams, a student of Ogilvie's from age 7 through 18, then a colleague and friend for 50 years.
NEWS
February 21, 2006
The House of Delegates convenes at 10 a.m. The Senate convenes at 10 a.m. Hearings of interest: The House Environmental Matters Committee hears testimony on 28 bills concerning government's ability to seize property through eminent domain for economic development purposes. The hearings begin at 1 p.m. The House Judiciary Committee considers several bills that would restrict illegal immigrants' ability to get driver's licenses. The hearings begin at 1 p.m.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,SUN STAFF | May 9, 1998
Give Maryland's Cathy Nelson the ball and she will create a shot.It may be for herself. It may be for a teammate. But as one of the most creative attack players in Division I women's lacrosse, Nelson always will make something happen.She relishes the chance to make the split-second decisions."That's what makes the game so exciting," said Nelson, a third-team All-America pick last year. "It's fun to see how your opportunities open up, how you can draw the double team and get other people open or how you can challenge one-on-one."
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2013
The Towson football team will practice Friday night for the first time since Christmas, and there is considerable uncertainty over whether senior quarterback Peter Athens will be able to participate. If he can't, sophomore Connor Frazier figures to take most of the reps with the first-team offense, and coach Rob Ambrose said coaches and players are very confident in his ability to lead the No. 7 seed Tigers. Frazier would be making his first career start against No. 1 seed and reigning back-to-back national champion North Dakota State in the NCAA Football Championship Subdivision title game on Jan. 4 at Toyota Stadium in Frisco, Tex. “I have no worries about that whatsoever,” Ambrose said Friday afternoon during a conference call.
NEWS
November 18, 2013
Until recently, one thing about Barack Obama that voters could count on was his coolness - that through all tribulation he would remain unflappable and steadfast. He was notably able to retain his composure in the face of unremitting partisan opposition. His self-confidence and optimism always kept him on course. But on two recent major policy matters, the president conspicuously second-guessed himself. First, he decided to go to Congress before going to war against Syria in response to its use of chemical weapons, and now he has retreated on certain terms of his embattled health-care insurance law. The first sudden reversal calmed war fears and so far at least has held out hope of unanticipated success in achieving the surrender of Bashar Assad's chemical weapons cache.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.