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By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,Sun reporter | August 24, 2007
Take heart, Orioles fans. Statisticians say Wednesday's 30-3 loss was an aberration - a fluke. Twins@Orioles Tonight, 7:05, MASN, 105.7 FM Starters: Johan Santana (13-9, 2.88) vs. Jeremy Guthrie (7-4, 3.44)
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SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,Sun reporter | August 24, 2007
Take heart, Orioles fans. Statisticians say Wednesday's 30-3 loss was an aberration - a fluke. Twins@Orioles Tonight, 7:05, MASN, 105.7 FM Starters: Johan Santana (13-9, 2.88) vs. Jeremy Guthrie (7-4, 3.44)
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SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2004
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - One cell phone call to Brady Anderson is interrupted because he's running with the track athletes at the University of California-Irvine. Another time, he cuts the conversation short to lift weights, promising to reserve a few minutes later in the day. Nighttime hours are spent feeding his 7-month-old daughter, Brianna, and putting her to bed. And the weekends aren't always good because he's competing in a flag football league. Perhaps the Orioles' second-most popular player behind Cal Ripken during his 14 years in Baltimore, Anderson has been retired from baseball since the San Diego Padres released him from their Triple-A affiliate in Portland, Ore., in 2003.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Reporter | January 11, 2007
INDIANAPOLIS -- From the moment Kansas City Chiefs running back Larry Johnson took his first handoff Saturday at the RCA Dome, the NFL's second-leading rusher this season was surrounded by members of the second-worst defense in the league. Were these really the same Indianapolis Colts whom Jacksonville Jaguars rookie Maurice Jones-Drew pounded for 166 yards and two touchdowns on only 15 carries a month before? The same Colts whom Houston Texans retread Ron Dayne punished for 153 yards and two touchdowns on 32 carries two weeks later?
SPORTS
By Ken Murray | April 1, 1996
What: NCAA national championshipWhere: Continental Airlines Arena, East Rutherford, N.J.When: Today, 9: 22 p.m.Line: Kentucky by 14Key matchups: The best matchups are inside, where Kentucky's Antoine Walker will guard John Wallace and the Wildcats' Walter McCarty will go against Otis Hill. Because Syracuse has two good post players, it will be harder for Kentucky to double down on defense. Another key will be how much damage Kentucky can do inside against Syracuse's 2-3 zone.Why Kentucky can win: Because of its superior depth and the confidence it gained with a close win over UMass.
NEWS
April 15, 1993
This is usually the time of year when people's thoughts are on crocuses, romance and baseball. Spring fever, the condition is called.Residents of this region, however, might be excused if their spring fever has lately been overtaken by a much less pleasant condition -- crime jitters. Consider some of the items recently crowding the news:* The trial of one of the accused killers of carjack victim Dr. Pam Basu, with more than its share of details both heart-rending and stomach-turning.* A concern about crime among residents of the Columbia community of Kings Contrivance.
NEWS
By Jeff Stryker | April 11, 1994
WHAT happens when good dogs go bad?Consider Taro, the 110-pound Akita from New Jersey recently granted clemency but exiled by Gov. Christine Todd Whitman.Taro, whose psychiatrist describes him as shy and withdrawn, was sentenced to death after being accused of biting his owner's niece on Christmas Day, 1990.The dog spent more than 1,000 days as Bergen County's prisoner No. 914095.The legal fees surpassed $100,000.It is tempting to view Taro's case as a modern aberration -- American litigiousness gone off the deep end.Not so: Animal trials have been around for centuries.
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | September 25, 1991
New York -- President Bush was here Monday. He didn't notice.The president went to an international enclave, legally not part of this city, and spoke to the foreigners who make up the U.N. on the East River. He knows more about them than he does about the citizens of the U.S. who live here, many of them on the streets, many in worse places.''When is he going to realize what's happening in this city -- and in other cities around the country?'' said a city commissioner. ''The place is falling apart and we need help.
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,SUN STAFF | November 15, 1996
After watching his team score just 71 points in a loss to the Chicago Bulls earlier this week, Phoenix Suns coach Cotton Fitzsimmons -- who stepped down after last night's game -- spoke of the state of the NBA."The only people who like it are the ones whose teams are winning. They can take anything," Fitzsimmons said. "But it's still not very entertaining."The performance by the Suns on Monday was no aberration -- scoring is way down in the NBA this season. Last November, there were eight games in which a team scored in the 70s or less.
NEWS
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,Special to the Sun | May 19, 2004
He's darling, isn't he, that man of yours? Three seasons of the year he can barely brew coffee, but then comes dusk on a summer Saturday. "Stand back, honey," he growls. With a ceremonial flourish, he waves his tongs about like a scepter, and then ascends (trumpet fanfare, please) to his glorious, if brief, reign as the Charlemagne of charcoal. If you think such chest-beating pageantry is an American aberration -- something your dad picked up from his dad, and that Grandpa learned watching television's Father Knows Best -- you're quite mistaken.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,sun reporter | September 16, 2006
Four carnations lay near the door of the Waverly Blockbuster yesterday - a small goodbye to a neighborhood fixture named Tony, a bear of a man who bragged about his children and chatted with regulars about recent releases and favorite films. Antonio "Tony" Gilmore, 38, the sales manager, was fatally shot Thursday night in the store on Homestead Street that was once the site of a post office. And for many in this city neighborhood on a slow but steady rebound, the crime was both heartbreaking and out of sync with recent progress.
NEWS
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,Special to the Sun | May 19, 2004
He's darling, isn't he, that man of yours? Three seasons of the year he can barely brew coffee, but then comes dusk on a summer Saturday. "Stand back, honey," he growls. With a ceremonial flourish, he waves his tongs about like a scepter, and then ascends (trumpet fanfare, please) to his glorious, if brief, reign as the Charlemagne of charcoal. If you think such chest-beating pageantry is an American aberration -- something your dad picked up from his dad, and that Grandpa learned watching television's Father Knows Best -- you're quite mistaken.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2004
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - One cell phone call to Brady Anderson is interrupted because he's running with the track athletes at the University of California-Irvine. Another time, he cuts the conversation short to lift weights, promising to reserve a few minutes later in the day. Nighttime hours are spent feeding his 7-month-old daughter, Brianna, and putting her to bed. And the weekends aren't always good because he's competing in a flag football league. Perhaps the Orioles' second-most popular player behind Cal Ripken during his 14 years in Baltimore, Anderson has been retired from baseball since the San Diego Padres released him from their Triple-A affiliate in Portland, Ore., in 2003.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen R. Proctor and By Stephen R. Proctor,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2002
Fans of H. L. Mencken, the original bad boy of American journalism, argue endlessly about the details of his life and work, but few would disagree on this point: There will never be another like him. But, as Baltimore prepares to celebrate Mencken Day -- its iconoclastic son was born 122 years ago Thursday -- the truth must be faced. There is, and has been, another Mencken. He's the outlaw journalist of our era -- Hunter S. Thompson. Comparing the erudite Mencken to a drug-addled madman like Thompson may leave scores of Menckenites sputtering into their coffee.
BUSINESS
By Robert Nusgart and Robert Nusgart,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2002
Saying it was more of a "blip" in activity, real estate agents shrugged at news that sales of existing homes in the Baltimore metropolitan area dropped last month, their first month-over-month decline in almost two years. Sales for the month were 3.01 percent lower than those in May 2001, according to statistics released yesterday by the Metropolitan Regional Information Systems Inc., the multiple listing database used by local brokers. The last time the monthly sales of existing homes failed to exceed the sales in the corresponding month of a previous year was in August 2000.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Caitlin Francke and Del Quentin Wilber and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | May 2, 2002
Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley stood behind the city's top lawyer, who has acknowledged interfering with a police investigation of his nephew and who officers say threatened their jobs while accusing them of using "Gestapo" tactics. O'Malley expressed strong support yesterday even though his police commissioner raised concerns about the actions of City Solicitor Thurman W. Zollicoffer Jr. and his ability to represent the department in court. The mayor called Tuesday night's incident an "aberration."
SPORTS
June 4, 1995
The short spring training has made for one wacky season. Who would've guessed that more than a month into the year, Melvin Nieves would have more homers than Jeff Bagwell, or that the Cubs, Padres and Tigers all would have more victories than the Yankees or Orioles. Now the question is whether the wackiness will continue:Item ........... CommentPhillies ....... Before the season started, Lenny Dykstra said this was the best team that he'd ever played on, and everybody laughed. He wasn't kidding.
NEWS
By GARLAND L. THOMPSON and GARLAND L. THOMPSON,Garland L. Thompson is an editorial writer for The Sun | March 30, 1991
National outrage greeted the broadcast video recording of Los Angeles police officers kicking and beating a black motorist they had stopped for a traffic violation, highlighting a problem long swept under the rug.Reporters quickly unearthed the fact that Los Angeles' police department had paid escalating settlements on lawsuits by victims of unjustified attacks by officers over the last decade.Chief Daryl Gates, defending his department, made the claim early on that the beating of Rodney King in full view of complaining onlookers was an aberration.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | June 20, 2000
When paramedics arrived at a Reisterstown home in October, they found an infant whose death placed her among a record-setting group of victims in Baltimore County: babies and toddlers who police say were killed. Sinaii Giddens, age 7 weeks, was one of five children under age 4 who police say were killed last year, a record that goes back at least 10 years and is a sharp increase from the one or two such homicides reported each year since 1990. Police and child abuse experts say the number is an aberration and not a trend.
NEWS
By CAROL TAVIS | May 31, 1998
Carol Tavris' name was misspelled in the byline and credit line for an article on school violence that appeared Sunday in the Perspective section.The Sun regrets the errors.Oh, no, we say, reading the news with horror and helplessness, another teen-age boy on a murderous rampage. This time it's a 15-year-old in Oregon who allegedly killed his parents and two fellow students. We haven't recovered from the incident involving the 11- and 13-year-olds in Jonesboro, Ark., who are accused of killing a teacher and four students March 24.These acts of vengeful cruelty, occurring not in the mean big city but in close-knit small communities, are especially threatening to our sense of safety and order.
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