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Aberdeen Proving Ground

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BUSINESS
March 31, 2010
St. John Properties said Tuesday that it will break ground in the second quarter on The Village Center at The GATE, a 78,000-square-foot shopping complex at Aberdeen Proving Ground. The center will be part of The Government and Technology Enterprise development at the military base in Harford County. St. John also is building 135,000 square feet of office space as part of the development in addition to 110,000 square feet of office space it already built. - Andrea K. Walker
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
When it comes to picking their next state senator, many Harford County voters will choose between two familiar names. The Democrat is Mary-Dulany James, a four-term state delegate whose father, William S. James, was a Maryland Senate president. The Republican is Bob Cassilly, who served on Bel Air's board of town commissioners and on the Harford County Council — and whose two brothers are also running for office in Harford this year. Both James and Cassilly believe they have the experience and vision to represent Harford's interests in Annapolis, replacing Nancy Jacobs, a Republican who is retiring after 16 years in the Senate.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
A longtime Army civilian at Aberdeen Proving Ground died after a "grass cutting incident" at work on Tuesday, officials said. Willie Stevenson, 61, was severely injured while he was riding a lawn mower near the Route 24 Gate on the Edgewood side of the Army post, spokesman Kelly Luster said. He did not describe what happened. Emergency personnel were called to the scene at about 9:15 a.m., Luster said. Stevenson was taken by helicopter to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center, where medical personnel were unable to save his life.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2014
Richard E. Kleinfelder, a retired construction manager who had also worked in equipment sales, died Sept. 13 at Stella Maris Hospice of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, more commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease. He was 66. The son of Julius Elwood "Bud" Kleinfelder, a Siemens salesman, and Dolores Kleinfelder, a homemaker, Richard Elwood Kleinfelder was born in Philadelphia and raised in Springfield, Pa. He and his family moved to Bloomfield Hills, Mich., where he graduated in 1966 from Bloomfield Hills High School.
EXPLORE
July 3, 2012
The 72,500-acre Aberdeen Proving Ground has been named to the Top Earth Day Champions list for its success in reducing harmful carbon emission and energy waste. The facility has a goal of reducing energy consumption 30 percent by 2015. Aberdeen Proving Ground is ranked third on the Earth Day Champions list; has reduced its carbon footprint by more than 24,499 metric tons - the equivalent of planting 5,224 acres of pine forests; and has modernized and upgraded more than 2,000 buildings.
EXPLORE
October 6, 2011
Aberdeen Proving Ground police were alerted to a suspicious person possibly carrying a rifle Wednesday morning, although further investigation revealed the person was not armed and was legitimately working on the federal installation. Two APG employees reported a suspicious person possibly carrying a rifle walking in the post's Edgewood Area at 7:45 a.m. Wednesday, according to a statement from the post public affairs office. APG law enforcement personnel investigated, questioned the person and cleared the environmental contract employee after he was confirmed to be carrying a stick while surveying the area, according to the statement.
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | June 18, 2013
A similar note was sent  to local and state elected officials and a copy was provided for publication. The purpose of this letter is to notify Maryland State and Local representatives of the impending closure of the U.S. Army Aberdeen Proving Ground Museum at the end of this fiscal year! There has been a museum present at APG since 1924 ,originally known as the U.S. Army Ordnance Museum.  Many of the artifacts have been part of APG since its founding in 1917 and have historical significance far beyond the boundaries of the post.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker | andrea.walker@baltsun.com | March 30, 2010
St. John Properties said Tuesday that it will break ground in the second quarter on The Village Center at The GATE, a 78,000-square-foot shopping complex at Aberdeen Proving Ground. The center will be part of The Government and Technology Enterprise development at the military base in Harford County. St. John is also building 135,00 square feet of office space as part of the development, which will be in addition to the 110,000 square feet of office space it has already built.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare | March 5, 2011
Four employees at Aberdeen Test Center at Aberdeen Proving Ground have received the Army's Award for Valor for their quick response to a fatal fire in May 2009 on the Harford County post. Three others received commander's awards, and one defense contractor employee was given a memorandum of appreciation. Maj. Gen. Genaro Dellarocco, commander of the U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command, presented the awards Thursday to Christopher Raab, Kevin Banigan, Philip Sibley Jr. and Michael Williams.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2014
A team of chemists and engineers from Aberdeen Proving Ground has begun to neutralize chemicals from Syria's weapons stocks, the Pentagon said Monday. The work is taking place aboard the container ship MV Cape Ray under heavy security at an undisclosed location in international waters. The ship left Gioia Tauro, Italy, with 600 tons of chemicals, including the World War I blister agent sulfur mustard and the sarin precursor DF. The team of some 64 civilians from the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, who developed a special system for neutralizing the chemicals aboard a ship, had waited months to get started.
NEWS
August 21, 2014
The announcement this week that scientists from Aberdeen Proving Ground have successfully completed the destruction of Syria's most dangerous chemical weapons has left the whole world breathing a little easier. If nothing else it ensures these cruel instruments of mass destruction will never be used against the U.S. or its allies - or against the Syrian people, who have been the main victims of the country's four-year civil war, which already has claimed more than 100,000 lives. Make no mistake: Syrian President Bashar al-Assad didn't turn over his country's chemical weapons to international inspectors last year out of any humanitarian impulse.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2014
A team of scientists from Aberdeen Proving Ground has completed the historic mission of destroying the most dangerous of Syria's declared chemical weapons stocks, Pentagon officials said Monday. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel called Navy Capt. Rich Dromerhauser on Monday morning to congratulate the team of some 64 civilians and contractors aboard the MV Cape Ray, Pentagon spokesman Rear Adm. John Kirby said. The chemists and engineers from the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground worked for more than a month aboard the specially fitted container ship to neutralize 600 tons of chemicals, including the World War I blister agent sulfur mustard and the sarin precursor DF. Officials have said the first-ever shipboard destruction of the weapons, performed under heavy international guard in the Mediterranean Sea, could serve as a model for future efforts to eradicate chemical weapons from the world's arsenals.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
After nearly a dozen years of war and scores of deployments, the Maryland National Guard is sending its last soldiers to Afghanistan - even as the killing of a U.S. general this week underscores the continuing volatility of the country and the NATO mission there. More than 100 members of the Maryland Guard's 1100th Theater Aviation Sustainment Maintenance Group landed in Kuwait on Wednesday, the day after Maj. Gen. Harold J. Greene was shot to death at Afghanistan's national military academy in Kabul.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
Maj. Gen. Harold J. Greene had served more than three decades in uniform without a combat tour when he got the assignment last year: He was wanted in Kabul to help train the Afghan National Security Forces. Jim Costigan, a former co-worker, golf partner and friend, had asked Greene the question before. Now he asked again. "I said, 'Harry, no one's going to be critical of you if you retire,' " Costigan, a retired Army colonel, remembered Wednesday. "'Just retire, now.' "And he said to me, 'I sent soldiers, officers, NCOs, men and women to similar assignments over the last 10 years.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2014
A chain-link fence marks the edge of Aberdeen Proving Ground, an Army installation where a nationwide base reorganization was supposed to bring so many people and jobs to Harford County that officials worried they would not have the space or resources to meet demand. Inside the fence, an estimated 21,000 people report to work, conducting research in massive new buildings. Shots fire in the distance. Sometimes bombs explode. But outside the fence, gleaming new offices completed in anticipation of economic spillover stand empty, a reminder that any growth that's taken place growth remains tightly contained.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2014
— After months of waiting, a team of chemists and engineers from Aberdeen Proving Ground is now ready to begin the historic destruction of Syria's chemical weapons, the Pentagon said Thursday. The work is to take place aboard a container ship specially fitted with equipment to neutralize Syrian stocks of the World War I blister agent sulfur mustard and the sarin precursor DF. The team of some 64 civilians from the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground sailed from Italy on Wednesday for an undisclosed location in international waters, where they plan to destroy the materials under heavy international guard.
NEWS
June 25, 2014
The Baltimore Sun's recent article concerning the U.S. military's experiment of employing tethered blimps to help with "homeland security" was replete with interesting information ( "Privacy advocates concerned about Aberdeen Proving Ground blimps," June 21). However, most stunning to me were the quotes from various civil liberty groups who were quick to ascribe possible nefarious tactical reasons to deploy the blimps along our East Coast. Citing previous violations of privacy by NSA eavesdropping, they completely missed or ignored the strategic implications behind the employment of radar-equipped static blimps tethered near Aberdeen Proving Grounds.
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