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Aberdeen City

NEWS
August 8, 1993
Council Move On Jolley A DisgraceThe latest action, or perhaps I should say, inaction, by the Aberdeen City councilmen with regard to the misconduct of the chief of police, Jack R. Jolley, is deplorable.The recent 4-1 vote by the council to give the city administrator, Peter Dacey, the responsibility for taking disciplinary action against Chief Jolley is, at best cowardly; at worst downright crooked, yet a clever move on their part.It doesn't take a rocket scientist to see through the council's plan -- by unloading their responsibility onto Mr. Dacey, the councilmen not only protected their friend, Chief Jolley, but they also preserved his position as chief of our police department.
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SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | June 2, 1995
ABERDEEN -- Hometown pride manifests itself as never before in the respect and admiration among friends and neighbors who watched Cal Ripken Jr. grow up. The mere idea of a museum in his honor is more than that. It will soon be reality, with the grand opening scheduled, along with a parade, on the day after he promises to establish baseball's all-time record for individual longevity.For circling a date on your calendar, make it Sept. 6 when he is scheduled to surpass what was believed to be Lou Gehrig's heretofore untouchable mark of playing 2,130 games for the New York Yankees.
NEWS
BY BRYNA ZUMER and MATT BUTTON | September 9, 2014
The makers of "House of Cards" don't show their hand often, but Aberdeen officials were tipped off that the hit Netflix is being filmed in their city at least part of this week. The show was expected to be filmed at the Bernard J. Tobin American Legion hall next to Aberdeen City Hall late Tuesday afternoon into the evening, according to security people who were helping with the set up earlier around the hall. During a meeting at city hall Monday afternoon, Aberdeen Police Department Lt. Fred Budnick told city council members to expect the film crew in the neighborhood the following day. Budnick said part of the street would be blocked off near the legion, city hall and Festival Park, but he didn't expect traffic to be seriously affected.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | June 3, 2002
Ground-water samples taken by the Army near Aberdeen's drinking-water wells contain a chemical linked to thyroid cancer, and a top environmental officer at Aberdeen Proving Ground says that discovery makes the area a "high priority" for investigation and treatment. The Army and Environmental Protection Agency stressed that no traces of the chemical, perchlorate, were found in the drinking water or in the 11 wells along the APG boundary. "It's not in city wells, but it's close -- too close for comfort," said University of Maryland toxicologist Cal Baier-Anderson, who works closely with the post on environmental issues.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | October 13, 2002
Aberdeen's water woes deepened after a water-use commission again delayed a decision on whether the city could supplement its supply with water from a Harford County river. Tom Beauduy, deputy director and counsel of the Susquehanna River Basin Commission, said the group would likely wait until December to rule on the permit because the city has not submitted results of a well-capacity test performed several weeks ago. The city wants to use water from Deer Creek so it can reduce its reliance on wells near Aberdeen Proving Ground in which perchlorate, a hazardous chemical, was discovered in June.
EXPLORE
RECORD STAFF REPORT | April 25, 2012
The City of Aberdeen's annual Earth Day celebration drew a good crowd to Festival Park Saturday, as the weather cooperated with sunny skies and mild temperatures. There were plenty of games made from recycled materials for the youngsters to play and plenty of animals for them to see and touch, including turtles, a green iguana, a chinchilla and rabbits. Earth Day also featured a number of environmental exhibits and activities such as face-painting and tie-dyed shirt making.
NEWS
By JUSTIN FENTON and JUSTIN FENTON,SUN REPORTER | August 4, 2006
Hoping to turn back the recent annexation of more than 500 acres - and the thousands of homes it could bring - a group of Aberdeen residents submitted a petition to City Hall yesterday with 3,000 signatures in an effort to put the issue to voters in a special election. The signatures - which have not been officially verified - suggest measurable discontent in this city of 14,000, where developers and city officials claim the development is a necessity for the workers who will come to the area as part of a military base realignment.
EXPLORE
RECORD STAFF REPORT | May 16, 2012
The Aberdeen Farmers Market is open for the season, Fridays from 3 p.m. until 7 in Festival Park at 60 N. Parke St. The market features Hickory Chance Farm's Angus cross beef, Keyes Creamery ice cream and cheese, herbs, flowers, heirloom vegetables, baked goods, seasonal produce, handmade furniture, bird houses, hanging flower baskets, dog treats and many more vendors. The market is open rain or shine. Festival Park is across from Aberdeen City Hall. For more information, call 410-272-1600
NEWS
January 22, 2006
TOMORROW Aberdeen City Council -- 6 p.m. meeting in the council chambers at city hall, 60 N. Parke St., 410-272-1600. Harford County Board of Education -- 6:30 p.m. business meeting at 102 S. Hickory Ave., Bel Air. 410-588-5203. Harford County Historic Preservation Commission -- 7 p.m. meeting at 220 S. Main St., Bel Air. 410-638-3103. TUESDAY Harford County Agricultural Preservation Advisory Board -- 7 p.m. meeting at 220 S. Main St., Bel Air. 410-638-3103. WEDNESDAY Jarrettsville/Norrisville Community Council -- 7 p.m. meeting in the Norrisville Community meeting room.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 27, 2003
Aberdeen City Manager Peter Dacey says the town planned to begin drawing water from Deer Creek over the weekend under an emergency-use certificate approved this month by state environmental officials. In a document dated July 14, the Susquehanna River Basin Commission - which regulates water use on Susquehanna tributaries - authorized withdrawals of up to 500,000 gallons a day, when available, after the Maryland Department of the Environment declared an emergency because of contamination in Aberdeen's wells.
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