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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2013
The Chesapeake Shakespeare Company 's future move to downtown Baltimore got a sizable financial boost from the Abell Foundation, which gave the organization $250,000. The money is for the renovation of the classic Mercantile Trust and Deposit Company building, which will become the company's new home, housing a 250-seat Globe Theatre-like performance space, administrative offices and educational facilities. Chesapeake Shakespeare has been based for a decade in Ellicott City, where it is known especially for its outdoor productions amid the ruins of the Patapsco Female Institute Historic Park.
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NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake plans to unveil dozens of recommendations Wednesday intended to lure immigrant families to Baltimore and retain them. The proposals, from increasing the availability of translators at city agencies to making it easier for the undocumented to buy homes, offer insight into the mayor's pledge to attract 10,000 new families over the next decade - an effort that is focused in part on the city's burgeoning immigrant neighborhoods. "I want to make sure that Baltimore isn't behind the curve on this trend," said Rawlings-Blake, who will formally announce the recommendations today.
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NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2011
The Abell Foundation has awarded the Baltimore State's Attorney's Office a grant worth nearly $128,000, which will be used to "double the capacity" of an anti-prostitution program, top prosecutor Gregg Bernstein announced Thursday. One of his deputy state's attorney's, Elizabeth Embry, is the daughter of foundation President Robert Embry, who could not be reached for comment. Roughly 1,200 prostitution arrests are logged in Baltimore each year, according to the State's Attorney's Office, which launched the "Specialized Prostitution Diversion" program in 2009 to help offenders break the recidivist cycle, by offering them drug, health and employment services.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2014
The Abell Foundation, best known for its charitable work battling poverty in Baltimore, went to court this week over a very different venture: designing hybrid engines for vehicles. Over the past 15 years, the foundation quietly became a player in the future of automobile development. It invested more than $25 million in Paice, a Baltimore firm that invented a way to improve the performance of combined gas/electric engines but in recent years has spent considerable time in court.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2012
The Abell Foundation, a decades-old Baltimore philanthropic institution that increasingly invests in technology startups to spur economic growth in Baltimore, said Monday it is paying $75,000 to fund a study to investigate the needs of the city's technology and innovation community. The newly formed Innovation Alliance, a group of technology veterans and entrepreneurs led by attorney Newt Fowler, will lead the study. "If Baltimore is going to progress economically, it needs to focus on startups and transferring the large amount of [university]
NEWS
June 2, 2011
Here we go again: Haven't these Move to Opportunity programs destroyed enough neighborhoods ("Closing Baltimore's achievement gap with housing policy," May 30)? It's a crime what the politicians did to Dundalk, Essex and the Patterson Park area, to name just a few. If you are so for this movement of people, move them into your neighborhoods, and those of the judges, lawyers and politicians who approve of this. Stop pushing them on working people. Martin, Fallston
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2014
The Abell Foundation, best known for its charitable work battling poverty in Baltimore, went to court this week over a very different venture: designing hybrid engines for vehicles. Over the past 15 years, the foundation quietly became a player in the future of automobile development. It invested more than $25 million in Paice, a Baltimore firm that invented a way to improve the performance of combined gas/electric engines but in recent years has spent considerable time in court.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | January 16, 1999
A struggling, 110-year-old glass manufacturer that employs 300 will remain open in Baltimore after the Abell Foundation made an undisclosed investment to save it.The Carr-Lowrey Glass Co., which makes glass containers for cosmetics and perfumes at a plant at 2201 Kloman St., had been searching for a buyer for months before the Abell Foundation stepped in, said K. Wayne Long, vice chairman of the company's board."
NEWS
December 28, 1996
THE PATTERSON PARK area contains many stereotypical East Baltimore neighborhoods of rowhouses, white marble steps and painted window screens. But as residents have aged, enrollment at the local Catholic school has dwindled and its future is threatened.The Abell Foundation has now come up with an unusual idea to promote both the neighborhood and the school. It is offering up to nine years of free education at the St. Elizabeth School to children whose parents purchase a renovated rowhouse from the non-profit East Fayette Street Community Development Corp.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,Sun reporter | September 30, 2007
A scathing report from The Abell Foundation on public housing in Baltimore suggests that the city's housing authority has "abandoned its mission to house the poor" by focusing on the demolition of properties instead of providing new housing. The report, to be published today on The Abell Foundation's Web site, says the number of occupied public housing units in the city has declined by 42 percent in the past 15 years - from 16,525 to 9,625. The report says the authority's plans for new housing are "unclear."
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
Peter DiPrinzio interviewed for jobs with big finance and consulting firms in his senior year of college in Vermont. Then he heard about a fledgling effort to send talented new graduates in a different direction - to jobs at startup companies in cities those grads might otherwise pass over. That program - like Teach For America but with an entrepreneurial twist - quickly hooked him. Now he's one of seven Venture for America "fellows" working in Baltimore, all of them about six months into two-year stints here.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2013
Nanotechnology developed in Baltimore could help brighten household LED light bulbs or touch screens in the new year as startup Pixelligent prepares to ramp up manufacturing. The Dundalk-based company is searching the region for space for a manufacturing facility capable of increasing its capacity to make nanocrystal coatings for electronics and semiconductors by 10 times or more. It has been making small quantities of the products at its Holabird Business Park offices since moving from College Park in 2011 but foresees demand growing dramatically next year as devices that use the nanocrystals make it into consumers' hands for the first time.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
Leigh Peterson has one of the coolest roofs in Baltimore. Her rowhouse near Patterson Park sports a blinding white cap, topped by a row of shiny solar panels. Peterson, 29, a graduate student at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, doesn't need to see her roof to know it's cool, though. She just has to count the dollars she's saved on air conditioning. She got her roof coated as part of a comprehensive energy retrofit of her 109-year-old house, and her August electricity bill was about half what she paid last year.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2013
Pixelligent Technologies, a maker of miniscule crystal additives used in electronics and plastics products, said Friday it has raised more than $5.1 million in new funding from the Abell Foundation and others. The funding will allow the Baltimore company to increase manufacturing capacity and hire application, engineering and business development employees, Pixelligent said. The company, which got its start in a College Park incubator, now has more than 30 commercial customers and hopes to open additional plants in Baltimore, Pennsylvania and Delaware.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2013
The Chesapeake Shakespeare Company 's future move to downtown Baltimore got a sizable financial boost from the Abell Foundation, which gave the organization $250,000. The money is for the renovation of the classic Mercantile Trust and Deposit Company building, which will become the company's new home, housing a 250-seat Globe Theatre-like performance space, administrative offices and educational facilities. Chesapeake Shakespeare has been based for a decade in Ellicott City, where it is known especially for its outdoor productions amid the ruins of the Patapsco Female Institute Historic Park.
NEWS
By Javier Miyares | February 26, 2013
Nineteen thousand four hundred thirteen. Focus on that number. Like so many numbers in news articles, you might easily have skipped over 19,413. But this is an important number for what is happening in Maryland higher education. According to the Cyber Security Jobs Report issued this month, this is the number of job openings in Maryland, as of October 2012, for qualified cybersecurity professionals. These are good, high-paying jobs. They are in such demand that the unemployment rate for people who qualify for them must be nearly zero.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,Staff Writer | February 7, 1993
Twice, Robert C. Embry Jr. tentatively embarked on campaigns to become mayor of Baltimore. Twice, he changed his mind. Now, he is president of the Abell Foundation, spending the foundation's money on school reform, health care, economic development -- and arguably shaping the city's social policies as much as any mayor ever has.With $150 million in assets and $7.5 million to give away each year, Abell is not the city's biggest foundation. But it is the most aggressive.Abell's work is visible everywhere: The contraceptive Norplant is widely available in city clinics.
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel | November 4, 1991
When an Abell Foundation study last month called the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre inadequate for large-scale, Broadway-style productions, it warned that efforts to replace the performing arts center need to begin immediately. But no one seems inclined to heed the admonition -- at least not publicly.Indeed, even the staunchest supporters of theater in Baltimore, mindful of the poor economic condition of the state and its subdivisions, are taking a cautious approach to the report, which said the 24-year-old Mechanic needs to be replaced with a larger, up-to-date facility costing a minimum of $25 million.
NEWS
January 14, 2013
In generations past, the world's oldest profession was a tawdry trade practiced mostly in the shadows of unlit street corners and darkened alleys. Today, vulnerable young women and girls are still being tricked or forced into selling their bodies to strangers by predatory and amoral pimps who deceive, threaten and abuse them - but the locus of "the stroll" has changed from sidewalks to computer screens. Increasingly, traffickers are going online to market their victims, and as a new study by the Abell Foundation warns, the rise in Internet sex trafficking is rapidly outstripping efforts to combat it. The study's authors concede that hard numbers are notoriously difficult to come by, since the vast majority of transactions take place out of view of authorities, and traffickers have become extremely sophisticated in managing their businesses.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2013
Baltimore is a hotbed of cybersecurity jobs, with more than 13,000 job postings last October alone, according to a report funded by the Abell Foundation. "This growth has created an urgent need for qualified individuals to fill current job openings and to develop the skilled workforce necessary to address the expected dramatic job growth in the future," says the report, announced Thursday. The region's job openings put it behind only Palo Alto and San Francisco, both in California, among eight regions commonly thought of as cybersecurity powerhouses, according to the report.
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