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Abel Wolman

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Dan Rodricks | October 2, 2011
If you head out to Loch Raven today for the Dam Jam festival celebrating the Baltimore metropolitan area's amazing water supply, remember three things: Texas, Abel Wolman and that thing called foresight. Every time I get into this subject, I reveal my inner nerd and my outer wow. I think our water system, which delivers billions of gallons to 1.2 million of us every year without fanfare or failure - give or take a water main break now and then - is an extraordinary human achievement.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | October 2, 2011
If you head out to Loch Raven today for the Dam Jam festival celebrating the Baltimore metropolitan area's amazing water supply, remember three things: Texas, Abel Wolman and that thing called foresight. Every time I get into this subject, I reveal my inner nerd and my outer wow. I think our water system, which delivers billions of gallons to 1.2 million of us every year without fanfare or failure - give or take a water main break now and then - is an extraordinary human achievement.
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NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | April 22, 1993
For decades, Johns Hopkins University Professor Abel Wolman was considered the world's best-known consultants on water and public health.An expert on sanitary engineering and water resources, Dr. Wolman advised dozens of international leaders and helped bring safe drinking water to millions of people.He also led the way in establishing a bountiful water supply for his native Baltimore.Now, four years after Dr. Wolman's death at age 96, the house he built in Baltimore and lived in for half a century is on the market.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | February 27, 2010
Dr. M. Gordon "Reds" Wolman, an internationally acclaimed geomorphologist and former longtime chairman of the department of geography and environmental engineering at the Johns Hopkins University, who was an outspoken advocate for a clean Chesapeake Bay and protection of the state's water resources, died Wednesday at his Mount Washington home. He was 85. Dr. Wolman's family declined Friday to release a cause of death. "With unparalleled personal and professional commitment to our natural resources and our environment, Reds pioneered actions on geologic and water quality issues including sediment, shore erosion control, oyster restoration and groundwater," Gov. Martin O'Malley said in a statement released Thursday.
NEWS
July 9, 1999
EACH DAY, millions of people across the world drink water from faucets and don't think twice about its purity because of a simple chemical process Abel Wolman developed with a classmate in 1918, three years after they graduated from college.They added small, measured amounts of chlorine, an otherwise toxic substance, to drinking water to kill microorganisms that cause life-threatening diseases.This celebrated discovery, which dramatically cut disease and improved world health, marked the beginning of an extraordinary career in environmental engineering and public health.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | June 28, 1993
The Abel Wolman house at 3213 N. Charles St., longtime residence of the visionary Johns Hopkins University professor and pioneer in the field of sanitary engineering, now belongs to the university.Hopkins officials bought the house this month at virtually no cost to the university because the entire $191,000 purchase price was covered by an anonymous donor "who wanted to keep the building in the Hopkins family," university spokesman Steve Libowitz said."In these economic times, to have a donor that steps forward and helps preserve the building and the history of Hopkins is a wonderful thing," he said.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | May 7, 1995
Dr. John Charles Geyer, an internationally recognized authority for pioneering studies on the origin and treatment of wastewater, radioactive wastes and storm drainage, died Tuesday after a lengthy illness at the Keswick Home. He was 88.Dr. Geyer was professor of environmental engineering at the Johns Hopkins University from 1937 to 1970, and was chairman of the department of sanitary engineering (now the department of geography and environmental engineering) from 1957 to 1970. He continued as principal research scientist until his retirement in 1976.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Sun Staff Writer | June 4, 1995
CHADDS FORD, Pa. -- More than 40 years ago, M. Gordon "Reds" Wolman trudged along the banks of the Brandywine here pretty much by himself, earning his doctorate in geology from Harvard.Yesterday, the 70-year-old Baltimorean, who has taught at the Johns Hopkins University for more than four decades, hiked onto the river's flood plain trailed by a mob of perhaps 100 admiring colleagues.They showed up here, at Hopkins and at the American Geophysical Union's spring meeting at the Baltimore Convention Center to pay homage to Dr. Wolman, an internationally-recognized authority on the forces that shape rivers, and to his work on environmental issues.
NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVAR | October 10, 1999
HOW do you sum up a century? How does a newspaper's editorial board evaluate 100 years worth of developments -- good and bad -- in its prime readership area?These were the questions confronting this newspaper's editorialists as they grappled with the best way to mark the arrival of the year 2000.What emerged was a decision to celebrate the best of what has happened in Baltimore and in Maryland since 1900 by selecting a group of individuals who made lasting and far-reaching contributions to our community and to society.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun reporter | August 20, 2007
It has been a hot, dry month of Code Reds and cooling centers - just the weather that M. Gordon "Reds" Wolman loves. The longtime Johns Hopkins University professor is not some sort of glutton for punishment. He just wants Marylanders to think about water - how much we have now and how much we will need later - and he knows the best time to ponder those questions is when the cornfields turn brown and the wells look as if they might run dry. "I'm not in favor of creating a Dante's inferno.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun reporter | August 20, 2007
It has been a hot, dry month of Code Reds and cooling centers - just the weather that M. Gordon "Reds" Wolman loves. The longtime Johns Hopkins University professor is not some sort of glutton for punishment. He just wants Marylanders to think about water - how much we have now and how much we will need later - and he knows the best time to ponder those questions is when the cornfields turn brown and the wells look as if they might run dry. "I'm not in favor of creating a Dante's inferno.
NEWS
By NORRIS WEST | January 9, 2000
THE question inevitably comes when someone dies at a seemingly premature age. Why? Some people trundle through life with every conceivable bad habit and live well into their 90s. Other folks do everything right -- eat the right things, exercise regularly, avoid smoke and drink -- and die young. Why? When Anne Arundel County Councilman Cliff R. Roop collapsed at a council public hearing Monday and died of a heart attack, lots of people asked why. Many were shocked as much as they were saddened.
NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVAR | October 10, 1999
HOW do you sum up a century? How does a newspaper's editorial board evaluate 100 years worth of developments -- good and bad -- in its prime readership area?These were the questions confronting this newspaper's editorialists as they grappled with the best way to mark the arrival of the year 2000.What emerged was a decision to celebrate the best of what has happened in Baltimore and in Maryland since 1900 by selecting a group of individuals who made lasting and far-reaching contributions to our community and to society.
NEWS
July 9, 1999
EACH DAY, millions of people across the world drink water from faucets and don't think twice about its purity because of a simple chemical process Abel Wolman developed with a classmate in 1918, three years after they graduated from college.They added small, measured amounts of chlorine, an otherwise toxic substance, to drinking water to kill microorganisms that cause life-threatening diseases.This celebrated discovery, which dramatically cut disease and improved world health, marked the beginning of an extraordinary career in environmental engineering and public health.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Sun Staff Writer | June 4, 1995
CHADDS FORD, Pa. -- More than 40 years ago, M. Gordon "Reds" Wolman trudged along the banks of the Brandywine here pretty much by himself, earning his doctorate in geology from Harvard.Yesterday, the 70-year-old Baltimorean, who has taught at the Johns Hopkins University for more than four decades, hiked onto the river's flood plain trailed by a mob of perhaps 100 admiring colleagues.They showed up here, at Hopkins and at the American Geophysical Union's spring meeting at the Baltimore Convention Center to pay homage to Dr. Wolman, an internationally-recognized authority on the forces that shape rivers, and to his work on environmental issues.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | May 7, 1995
Dr. John Charles Geyer, an internationally recognized authority for pioneering studies on the origin and treatment of wastewater, radioactive wastes and storm drainage, died Tuesday after a lengthy illness at the Keswick Home. He was 88.Dr. Geyer was professor of environmental engineering at the Johns Hopkins University from 1937 to 1970, and was chairman of the department of sanitary engineering (now the department of geography and environmental engineering) from 1957 to 1970. He continued as principal research scientist until his retirement in 1976.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | February 27, 2010
Dr. M. Gordon "Reds" Wolman, an internationally acclaimed geomorphologist and former longtime chairman of the department of geography and environmental engineering at the Johns Hopkins University, who was an outspoken advocate for a clean Chesapeake Bay and protection of the state's water resources, died Wednesday at his Mount Washington home. He was 85. Dr. Wolman's family declined Friday to release a cause of death. "With unparalleled personal and professional commitment to our natural resources and our environment, Reds pioneered actions on geologic and water quality issues including sediment, shore erosion control, oyster restoration and groundwater," Gov. Martin O'Malley said in a statement released Thursday.
NEWS
By NORRIS WEST | January 9, 2000
THE question inevitably comes when someone dies at a seemingly premature age. Why? Some people trundle through life with every conceivable bad habit and live well into their 90s. Other folks do everything right -- eat the right things, exercise regularly, avoid smoke and drink -- and die young. Why? When Anne Arundel County Councilman Cliff R. Roop collapsed at a council public hearing Monday and died of a heart attack, lots of people asked why. Many were shocked as much as they were saddened.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | June 28, 1993
The Abel Wolman house at 3213 N. Charles St., longtime residence of the visionary Johns Hopkins University professor and pioneer in the field of sanitary engineering, now belongs to the university.Hopkins officials bought the house this month at virtually no cost to the university because the entire $191,000 purchase price was covered by an anonymous donor "who wanted to keep the building in the Hopkins family," university spokesman Steve Libowitz said."In these economic times, to have a donor that steps forward and helps preserve the building and the history of Hopkins is a wonderful thing," he said.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | April 22, 1993
For decades, Johns Hopkins University Professor Abel Wolman was considered the world's best-known consultants on water and public health.An expert on sanitary engineering and water resources, Dr. Wolman advised dozens of international leaders and helped bring safe drinking water to millions of people.He also led the way in establishing a bountiful water supply for his native Baltimore.Now, four years after Dr. Wolman's death at age 96, the house he built in Baltimore and lived in for half a century is on the market.
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