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Abbie Hoffman

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NEWS
January 1, 1999
Anita Hoffman, 56, who helped then-husband Abbie Hoffman plot the most memorable pranks of the Yippie movement and later helped him hide for years from the FBI, died of breast cancer Sunday in San Francisco.Ms. Hoffman helped Abbie Hoffman disrupt the New York Stock Exchange by throwing money on the trading floor, encircle the Pentagon in a protest against the Vietnam War and plan the demonstrations in Chicago during the 1968 Democratic National Convention.Though they divorced, Ms. Hoffman supported Mr. Hoffman for years while he lived underground to escape drug charges.
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NEWS
By [MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN] | May 13, 2007
John Waters may be the darling of movies, theater and television, including a new stint as host of a series on Court TV called 'Til Death Do Us Part, but he'd really rather be reading. "The only things I have to have are books," Waters says. "I've always said, 'Success to me is not about money, it's that you can buy every book you wanted without thinking about the price.'" With the success of his films and a Broadway smash like Hairspray, Waters can certainly support his book-a-day habit.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 29, 1994
Jerry Rubin, the firebrand 1960s radical who used to preach distrust of "anyone over 30," died last night in a Los Angeles hospital. He was 56.The cause was cardiac arrest, a hospital spokesman said. Mr. Rubin was struck by a car on Nov. 15 in Los Angeles. Local authorities said he was hit while jaywalking. He underwent surgery later that day, at the University of California at Los Angeles Medical Center and subsequently was listed in critical condition there.Mr. Rubin was a bearded standard-bearer of the New Left in the 1960s who helped carve himself a niche in American radical history with fey and energetic protest gestures, though his views and style changed in subsequent decades.
NEWS
January 1, 1999
Anita Hoffman, 56, who helped then-husband Abbie Hoffman plot the most memorable pranks of the Yippie movement and later helped him hide for years from the FBI, died of breast cancer Sunday in San Francisco.Ms. Hoffman helped Abbie Hoffman disrupt the New York Stock Exchange by throwing money on the trading floor, encircle the Pentagon in a protest against the Vietnam War and plan the demonstrations in Chicago during the 1968 Democratic National Convention.Though they divorced, Ms. Hoffman supported Mr. Hoffman for years while he lived underground to escape drug charges.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | December 8, 1993
Let's say you're Christmas shopping at Towson Marketplace. You've found a spiffy warm-up suit for junior when you notice something strange going on in the former showroom of Shavitz Furniture.You walk in and someone asks you to select a button from a display bearing such slogans as: "US Troops Out of the Middle East" and "Boycott Excessive Packaging"; someone else hands you a slip of paper and asks you to write down an issue and put the paper in a top hat.And oh yes, a third person asks you for $7 and hands you a program for Mother Lode Productions' original theater piece, "Abbie/Other Works of Art/Lee," written by Joe Brady and Karen Bradley and subtitled "An interactive journey through an art gallery with the mythic figures of the American left and right: Abbie Hoffman and Lee Atwater."
NEWS
By [MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN] | May 13, 2007
John Waters may be the darling of movies, theater and television, including a new stint as host of a series on Court TV called 'Til Death Do Us Part, but he'd really rather be reading. "The only things I have to have are books," Waters says. "I've always said, 'Success to me is not about money, it's that you can buy every book you wanted without thinking about the price.'" With the success of his films and a Broadway smash like Hairspray, Waters can certainly support his book-a-day habit.
NEWS
By Lisa Schwarzbaum and Lisa Schwarzbaum,special to the sun | January 19, 1997
"Sewer, Gas & Electric," by Matt Ruff. Atlantic Monthly Press, 528 pages, $23.In Matt Ruff's not-too-distant future (we're talking 2023 here, long after the African Pandemic of '04 has wiped out all the black people on earth except those with green eyes), civilization will be a stew of pop culture references, giant corporations and crumbling urban infrastructures.Donald Trump will have left the stage (burned in Cape Canaveral launch pad fire while he was attempting to be the first Martian billionaire)
NEWS
March 27, 1993
HAVING RECENTLY acquired a copy of the latest (16th) edition of "Bartlett's Familiar Quotations" (Justin Kaplan, general editor), a brief skim-through reveals some fascinating changes.For one thing, the book's index seems almost as long as the text -- and that, indeed, is the case. The familiar quotations take up 791 pages; the indexed listing of these quotes runs a mind-boggling 608 pages.There are more than 20,000 well-known (and not-so well-known) comments in the new edition. Many of the new entries are taken from modern-day popular culture.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 15, 1996
The problem with good is that it's not nearly as interesting as bad, and that's a conundrum the makers of "Entertaining Angels" never quite solve.A biography of the saintly and self-effacing Catholic activist and journalist Dorothy Day (1897- 1980), who lived an exemplary life, the movie is rather commonplace for its uncommon subject. Far too often it falls back on the language of cliche and on wacky characterizations from actors -- Martin Sheen, for one -- who ought to know better. It glosses over some really interesting materials to focus on some less interesting materials.
NEWS
October 26, 2011
I am happy to see that once again there are Americans raising their voices in protest. I know I'm not happy with the direction that our elected officials, the banking industry and the military-industrial complex are taking this country. Our third president, Thomas Jefferson, recognized the need for "a little rebellion every so often. " Critics of the people who are beginning to protest say they lack direction. But it seems to me that once groups of people emerge who are disenchanted enough to organize, leaders eventually will appear.
NEWS
By Lisa Schwarzbaum and Lisa Schwarzbaum,special to the sun | January 19, 1997
"Sewer, Gas & Electric," by Matt Ruff. Atlantic Monthly Press, 528 pages, $23.In Matt Ruff's not-too-distant future (we're talking 2023 here, long after the African Pandemic of '04 has wiped out all the black people on earth except those with green eyes), civilization will be a stew of pop culture references, giant corporations and crumbling urban infrastructures.Donald Trump will have left the stage (burned in Cape Canaveral launch pad fire while he was attempting to be the first Martian billionaire)
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 15, 1996
The problem with good is that it's not nearly as interesting as bad, and that's a conundrum the makers of "Entertaining Angels" never quite solve.A biography of the saintly and self-effacing Catholic activist and journalist Dorothy Day (1897- 1980), who lived an exemplary life, the movie is rather commonplace for its uncommon subject. Far too often it falls back on the language of cliche and on wacky characterizations from actors -- Martin Sheen, for one -- who ought to know better. It glosses over some really interesting materials to focus on some less interesting materials.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 29, 1994
Jerry Rubin, the firebrand 1960s radical who used to preach distrust of "anyone over 30," died last night in a Los Angeles hospital. He was 56.The cause was cardiac arrest, a hospital spokesman said. Mr. Rubin was struck by a car on Nov. 15 in Los Angeles. Local authorities said he was hit while jaywalking. He underwent surgery later that day, at the University of California at Los Angeles Medical Center and subsequently was listed in critical condition there.Mr. Rubin was a bearded standard-bearer of the New Left in the 1960s who helped carve himself a niche in American radical history with fey and energetic protest gestures, though his views and style changed in subsequent decades.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | December 8, 1993
Let's say you're Christmas shopping at Towson Marketplace. You've found a spiffy warm-up suit for junior when you notice something strange going on in the former showroom of Shavitz Furniture.You walk in and someone asks you to select a button from a display bearing such slogans as: "US Troops Out of the Middle East" and "Boycott Excessive Packaging"; someone else hands you a slip of paper and asks you to write down an issue and put the paper in a top hat.And oh yes, a third person asks you for $7 and hands you a program for Mother Lode Productions' original theater piece, "Abbie/Other Works of Art/Lee," written by Joe Brady and Karen Bradley and subtitled "An interactive journey through an art gallery with the mythic figures of the American left and right: Abbie Hoffman and Lee Atwater."
NEWS
March 27, 1993
HAVING RECENTLY acquired a copy of the latest (16th) edition of "Bartlett's Familiar Quotations" (Justin Kaplan, general editor), a brief skim-through reveals some fascinating changes.For one thing, the book's index seems almost as long as the text -- and that, indeed, is the case. The familiar quotations take up 791 pages; the indexed listing of these quotes runs a mind-boggling 608 pages.There are more than 20,000 well-known (and not-so well-known) comments in the new edition. Many of the new entries are taken from modern-day popular culture.
NEWS
By Robert M. Pennington of the Ann Arrundell County Historical Society | April 16, 1995
25 Years Ago* Yippie leader Abbie Hoffman marched some 300 anti-war protesters within shouting distance of Fort George G. Meade. There were no incidents although Fort Meade canceled traditional Armed Forces Day celebrations fearing large anti-war protests. -- The Sun, May 17, 1970.* Jane Fonda and 17 followers were escorted off the premises at Fort Meade when they made an attempt to pass out anti-war pamphlets. No charges will be pressed but the group subsequently was barred forever from the sprawling post.
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