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By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2011
The melody is instantly familiar but the other sounds are not - horns boldly announce their arrival, the patient tempo crawls along and the voice is more Maryland than Liverpool. When the plea to stay kicks in - "Believe me when I beg you, don't ever leave me alone," he sings - the song's identity becomes clear. It's "Oh! Darling," the Lennon/McCartney classic, but this bouncing version comes courtesy of Yellow Dubmarine, a Rockville eight-piece that plays reggae versions of Beatles songs.
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By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2013
Crosswalks, unless you happen to be on Abbey Road, tend to be boring.  Until last week, the most exciting thing you'll see in a Baltimore crosswalk is an occasional Toynbee tile. But now the folks at the Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts are livening up crosswalks near the historic Bromo Seltzer Tower in the city's newest Arts and Entertainment district.  Baltimore artist Graham Coreil-Allen painted a hopscotch court in a crosswalk at Eutaw and Lombard Streets that was unveiled today.
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FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2013
Crosswalks, unless you happen to be on Abbey Road, tend to be boring.  Until last week, the most exciting thing you'll see in a Baltimore crosswalk is an occasional Toynbee tile. But now the folks at the Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts are livening up crosswalks near the historic Bromo Seltzer Tower in the city's newest Arts and Entertainment district.  Baltimore artist Graham Coreil-Allen painted a hopscotch court in a crosswalk at Eutaw and Lombard Streets that was unveiled today.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2011
The melody is instantly familiar but the other sounds are not - horns boldly announce their arrival, the patient tempo crawls along and the voice is more Maryland than Liverpool. When the plea to stay kicks in - "Believe me when I beg you, don't ever leave me alone," he sings - the song's identity becomes clear. It's "Oh! Darling," the Lennon/McCartney classic, but this bouncing version comes courtesy of Yellow Dubmarine, a Rockville eight-piece that plays reggae versions of Beatles songs.
NEWS
By LYDIA LEWIS BLOCH | June 12, 1992
It's Saturday night at An Die Musik in Towson. The store'sneon light squirts peacock blue into the night while we flip through CDs.An 11-year-old I happen to know well is fingering the Beatles collection. ''I'd like to buy one of these. How about 'Rubber Soul'?''I first heard the Beatles at a tea party -- in South America. Joy had come home from boarding school in England. Her mother served tea in painted China cups. A huge Christmas cake filled with rum, raisins and thick globs of icing, ''just like snow,'' they said, was set on a silver platter by the tea things.
TRAVEL
By Lou Carlozo and Lou Carlozo,Chicago Tribune | November 21, 1999
I am a Beatlemaniac.I've known this since I was 4. At that age, I sported Beatle bangs and learned how to clamber atop the family stereo so I could change 45s for my big brother while he did his homework. The song that stuck in my head and heart was "Strawberry Fields Forever," inspired, I later learned, by John Lennon's childhood.As a kid, I collected all the Beatles music and minutiae I could find. John inspired me to take up guitar at 14. And when Lennon was assassinated, I wore black to school the next day (guess who my favorite Beatle was)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Al Cunniff and By Al Cunniff,Special to the Sun | April 21, 2002
A visit to Paul McCartney's house wasn't exactly what you'd expect. Then again, neither was I. A young Baltimore reporter and Beatles nut, in London to research a few feature stories, I was standing in the kitchen of the ultimate singer / songwriter, in a telephone company jacket, holding the back end of a ladder, and in a tizzy. It's a long story ... one untold until now. In the late summer of 1975, songwriter and producer Tony Macaulay agreed to an interview at his home in St. Johns Wood, a comfortable upper-middle-class suburb of London.
TRAVEL
May 22, 2005
Let it be ... in Louisville As many as 20,000 Beatles fans are expected in Louisville, Ky., over Memorial Day weekend for America's largest Beatles festival, which is making this city its new home. "Abbey Road on the River" has been held the past three years in Cleveland but will move to Kentucky for this year's event, which runs Friday through Sunday. Tourism spending from the festival is expected to pump about $3 million into the local economy, according to Mayor Jerry Abramson. The weekend will include a Beatles film festival, lectures on the rock group and the sale of memorabilia, including paintings by well-known artists.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | January 22, 1994
Can it be? Are the Beatles really getting back together again?It's understandable if some longtime fans are a little skeptical. After 24 years of speculation, gossip, prayers and pipe-dreams, the news that a Beatles reunion is in the works is bound to seem too good to be true.But true it seems to be. A story in the New Yorker reported this week that the three surviving Beatles -- Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr -- will enter the studio next month to record new material for release in 1995.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | August 19, 2002
Virginia Worthington Schardt, a Towson University professor of kinesiology whose struggle with breast cancer was chronicled in June in The Sun, died Friday of complications of the disease at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. She was 44 and lived in Perry Hall. Known to friends and family as "Ginny," Dr. Schardt inspired hundreds of students during her short career. She also left many awed by her unflagging optimism, humor, and dedication to the classroom, even as the disease spread to her bones to brain.
TRAVEL
By Marriam Shah, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2010
As summer winds down, Marylanders can rev up for one more huzzah in the form of Abbey Road on the River, said to be the largest Beatles tribute festival in the world, which lands at National Harbor this week. The five-day event, staged originally in Kentucky, is expected to draw large crowds to the Potomac riverfront from Thursday through Labor Day. "We're going to have five stages and over 40 bands, and we'll be screening two movies," said event producer Gary Jacob, adding that the plan is to make the festival an annual event in the area.
TRAVEL
May 22, 2005
Let it be ... in Louisville As many as 20,000 Beatles fans are expected in Louisville, Ky., over Memorial Day weekend for America's largest Beatles festival, which is making this city its new home. "Abbey Road on the River" has been held the past three years in Cleveland but will move to Kentucky for this year's event, which runs Friday through Sunday. Tourism spending from the festival is expected to pump about $3 million into the local economy, according to Mayor Jerry Abramson. The weekend will include a Beatles film festival, lectures on the rock group and the sale of memorabilia, including paintings by well-known artists.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | August 19, 2002
Virginia Worthington Schardt, a Towson University professor of kinesiology whose struggle with breast cancer was chronicled in June in The Sun, died Friday of complications of the disease at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. She was 44 and lived in Perry Hall. Known to friends and family as "Ginny," Dr. Schardt inspired hundreds of students during her short career. She also left many awed by her unflagging optimism, humor, and dedication to the classroom, even as the disease spread to her bones to brain.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Al Cunniff and By Al Cunniff,Special to the Sun | April 21, 2002
A visit to Paul McCartney's house wasn't exactly what you'd expect. Then again, neither was I. A young Baltimore reporter and Beatles nut, in London to research a few feature stories, I was standing in the kitchen of the ultimate singer / songwriter, in a telephone company jacket, holding the back end of a ladder, and in a tizzy. It's a long story ... one untold until now. In the late summer of 1975, songwriter and producer Tony Macaulay agreed to an interview at his home in St. Johns Wood, a comfortable upper-middle-class suburb of London.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun Staff | March 10, 2002
MOAB, Utah -- Edward Abbey's pickup truck runs as good as it looks, which is to say not good at all. And the mostly blue rig isn't much for comfort, either, unless you delight in finding the gummy, silvery residue from old duct tape stuck to your backside and hands and feeling the occasional poke from a wayward spring looking for an escape route. Still, the truck rumbles to life most days (except when it doesn't care to), providing a welcome reminder of its one-time owner, the prickly iconoclast of red rock country who died 13 years ago this week.
TRAVEL
By Lou Carlozo and Lou Carlozo,Chicago Tribune | November 21, 1999
I am a Beatlemaniac.I've known this since I was 4. At that age, I sported Beatle bangs and learned how to clamber atop the family stereo so I could change 45s for my big brother while he did his homework. The song that stuck in my head and heart was "Strawberry Fields Forever," inspired, I later learned, by John Lennon's childhood.As a kid, I collected all the Beatles music and minutiae I could find. John inspired me to take up guitar at 14. And when Lennon was assassinated, I wore black to school the next day (guess who my favorite Beatle was)
NEWS
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | October 20, 1996
Everybody knows that the '60s were the greatest decade of rock and roll.Everybody knows this because we've heard it thousands and thousands of times -- from the baby-boomer pundits who grew up on the music of the '60s; from the thirtysomethings who have spent most of their adulthood being reminded that they missed out on the Greatest of All Rock Decades; and from Gen-X-ers who grew up listening to their parents' Beatles and Dylan albums.Everybody also knows that the '70s was the lamest decade for rock.
TRAVEL
By Marriam Shah, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2010
As summer winds down, Marylanders can rev up for one more huzzah in the form of Abbey Road on the River, said to be the largest Beatles tribute festival in the world, which lands at National Harbor this week. The five-day event, staged originally in Kentucky, is expected to draw large crowds to the Potomac riverfront from Thursday through Labor Day. "We're going to have five stages and over 40 bands, and we'll be screening two movies," said event producer Gary Jacob, adding that the plan is to make the festival an annual event in the area.
NEWS
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | October 20, 1996
Everybody knows that the '60s were the greatest decade of rock and roll.Everybody knows this because we've heard it thousands and thousands of times -- from the baby-boomer pundits who grew up on the music of the '60s; from the thirtysomethings who have spent most of their adulthood being reminded that they missed out on the Greatest of All Rock Decades; and from Gen-X-ers who grew up listening to their parents' Beatles and Dylan albums.Everybody also knows that the '70s was the lamest decade for rock.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | January 22, 1994
Can it be? Are the Beatles really getting back together again?It's understandable if some longtime fans are a little skeptical. After 24 years of speculation, gossip, prayers and pipe-dreams, the news that a Beatles reunion is in the works is bound to seem too good to be true.But true it seems to be. A story in the New Yorker reported this week that the three surviving Beatles -- Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr -- will enter the studio next month to record new material for release in 1995.
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