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By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,Sun Staff Writer | May 24, 1994
The national NAACP and a minority lawyers' group are gearing up for a battle with the American Bar Association over the nomination of Alexander Williams Jr. for a seat on Maryland's federal bench.The nomination of Mr. Williams, the state's attorney for Prince George's County, slipped into limbo after an ABA review committee raised doubts about his qualifications. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People is preparing for a public confrontation with the ABA unless the 9-month-old nomination of Mr. Williams moves forward soon, said Leroy W. Warren Jr., chairman of the organization's Crime and Criminal Justice Committee.
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SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
On Friday he is to be enshrined in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame, a greying icon of a long-gone professional league that introduced the tri-colored ball and the 3-point shot. That's where Bob "Slick" Leonard won acclaim. Three times in the early 1970s, Leonard coached the Indiana Pacers to championships in the American Basketball Association before it merged with the NBA in 1976. But while his induction is expected to embrace his Hoosier roots and ABA genius, Leonard really honed his skills as the Bullets' coach in 1963-64.
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NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | June 12, 1998
Children with autism in Howard County schools will receive increased instructional time and their teachers will get additional training if the school board approves proposed changes to the special education program. But some parents who are not confident the proposed changes would meet the needs of their autistic children presented a counterproposal to the school system's plan at a school board meeting last night. "One theoretical framework of teaching children with autism does not fit all," said Sue Ann Shafley, the parent of a 3-year-old and a member of the Howard County Chapter of the Autism Society of America.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2011
If you are offered a short-term advance on your paycheck at a triple-digit interest rate, you might think you're being pitched a payday loan — a product that's basically banned in Maryland and other states with rate caps. But what if that deal came from your bank? A few banks, including Wells Fargo & Co., offer deposit advance programs that allow customers with direct deposit to borrow against their next paycheck. The bank collects its due when the paycheck is directly deposited in the account a week or so later.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
On Friday he is to be enshrined in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame, a greying icon of a long-gone professional league that introduced the tri-colored ball and the 3-point shot. That's where Bob "Slick" Leonard won acclaim. Three times in the early 1970s, Leonard coached the Indiana Pacers to championships in the American Basketball Association before it merged with the NBA in 1976. But while his induction is expected to embrace his Hoosier roots and ABA genius, Leonard really honed his skills as the Bullets' coach in 1963-64.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | August 25, 1992
Baltimore lawyer J. Michael McWilliams became president of the 370,000-member American Bar Association (ABA) at the group's annual convention this month.Mr. McWilliams, 53, a senior partner in the Baltimore firm of Tydings & Rosenberg, is the first Marylander to head the association. He takes office at a time when lawyers and lawsuits are being blamed for some of the nation's economic problems.Q: President Bush and Vice President Quayle are blaming trial lawyers for generating too many lawsuits and hurting the nation's competitiveness.
NEWS
By Michael O'Hanlon and Cathryn Garland | March 1, 2011
The Maryland General Assembly is presently considering a bill that would require health insurance companies in the state to provide coverage for therapy designed to address the challenges of autism. Half the nation's states have already passed similar legislation, in one form or another, and Maryland should too. At primary issue is a type of therapy known as applied behavior analysis, or ABA. This is the most thoroughly researched and peer-reviewed method for addressing the challenges faced by those with an autism spectrum disorder.
NEWS
August 26, 1992
Bar goes too farIn February 1990, The Evening Sun published a news item under the heading, "Abortion -- Bar Association Backs the Right to Choose." In substance, the article referred to the American Bar Association's approval of a resolution opposing government interference with a woman's decision to have an abortion.Because of vigorous protest by attorneys nationwide, the American Bar Association withdrew the resolution, reverting to its previous position of neutrality.At the recent annual meeting of the association, its House of Delegates approved a similar resolution, passed and then revoked in 1990, favoring abortion rights.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2011
If you are offered a short-term advance on your paycheck at a triple-digit interest rate, you might think you're being pitched a payday loan — a product that's basically banned in Maryland and other states with rate caps. But what if that deal came from your bank? A few banks, including Wells Fargo & Co., offer deposit advance programs that allow customers with direct deposit to borrow against their next paycheck. The bank collects its due when the paycheck is directly deposited in the account a week or so later.
FEATURES
By From staff reports | July 9, 1999
Taylor Branch's second narrative of the civil rights era, "Pillar of Fire: America in the King Years 1963-1965," has won the 1999 Silver Gavel Award from the American Bar Association.The book, published last year, is the second in a planned trilogy by the Baltimore historian. Branch has said that he "hopes to sustain his thesis that [Martin Luther] King's life is the best and most important metaphor for American history in the watershed post-war years."The ABA award goes annually to writers who best illustrate the legal system.
NEWS
By Michael O'Hanlon and Cathryn Garland | March 1, 2011
The Maryland General Assembly is presently considering a bill that would require health insurance companies in the state to provide coverage for therapy designed to address the challenges of autism. Half the nation's states have already passed similar legislation, in one form or another, and Maryland should too. At primary issue is a type of therapy known as applied behavior analysis, or ABA. This is the most thoroughly researched and peer-reviewed method for addressing the challenges faced by those with an autism spectrum disorder.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Dolan and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun reporters | February 22, 2008
Despite a top rating from the American Bar Association this week, Maryland U.S. Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein faces key opposition from the state's senators for a post on a federal appeals court. The ABA's Standing Committee on the Federal Judiciary unanimously rated Rosenstein "well-qualified," its top ranking for judicial nominees. But Maryland's senators appear to be unmoved. At a White House event this month, President Bush singled out Rosenstein, saying the Richmond, Va.-based U.S. Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit is overburdened and understaffed.
NEWS
By Maurice Possley and Maurice Possley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 29, 2007
The American Bar Association, concluding a three-year study of capital punishment systems in eight states, found so many inequities and shortfalls that the group is calling for a nationwide moratorium on executions. In a study to be released today, the lawyers organization, which has more than 400,000 members, said that death penalty systems in Indiana, Georgia, Ohio, Alabama and Tennessee - in particular - had so many problems that those states should institute a temporary halt to executions immediately until further study can be conducted.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | June 1, 2007
The American Basketball Association announced yesterday that it would return to the city of Baltimore in the fall under the leadership of businesswoman Kia Feaster. "We've always felt that Baltimore could be, should be, a premier city for the ABA with the right ownership," ABA chief executive officer Joe Newman said in a news release. "Kia attended the ABA league meeting in April, and we have no doubt about her ability and commitment." Baltimore native Kirk Mitchell will be director of operations and head coach.
NEWS
By LARRY WILLIAMS and LARRY WILLIAMS,IDEAS EDITOR | July 30, 2006
When George W. Bush recently vetoed legislation that would have expanded federal funding of stem cell research, there was much ado about the fact that it was his first veto move since taking office in 2001. And, in fact, it was remarkable. Only Thomas Jefferson made it through two full terms without a veto. Jefferson's restraint was based on his personal belief that only legislation that appeared to violate mandates of the U.S. Constitution should be vetoed. Bush has had a different method.
NEWS
By MARK SILVA and MARK SILVA,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 24, 2006
WASHINGTON -- President Bush has vetoed only one piece of legislation during more than five years in office, but he has issued more than 800 challenges to bills that he has signed into law with formal "signing statements," more than all his predecessors combined. Now, a task force of the American Bar Association has concluded that the president's signing statements pose a dangerous challenge to the constitutional checks and balances central to power in the United States. One signing statement reserves the right to torture detainees held in the war on terrorism.
NEWS
September 1, 1991
Washington County Circuit Judge John P. Corderman has been elected to the American Bar Association's board of governors.During his three-year term, Judge Corderman will represent the 3rd District, which includes Maryland. The 33-member board meets five times a year to oversee the administration of the ABA and its more than 360,000 members.Judge Corderman was elected to the board at the organization's annual meeting recently in Atlanta. He has been a member of the ABA's house of delegates.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | June 1, 2007
The American Basketball Association announced yesterday that it would return to the city of Baltimore in the fall under the leadership of businesswoman Kia Feaster. "We've always felt that Baltimore could be, should be, a premier city for the ABA with the right ownership," ABA chief executive officer Joe Newman said in a news release. "Kia attended the ABA league meeting in April, and we have no doubt about her ability and commitment." Baltimore native Kirk Mitchell will be director of operations and head coach.
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2004
Alexandria, Va., businessman Melvin Coles said yesterday that he will bring an American Basketball Association franchise to Baltimore for the 2005-06 season, and he expects to name the team's first player today. An official announcement of the ABA team coming here will be made in the near future, said Coles, who owns Electrolite02 - the official drinking water of the ABA. Coles, who would not say how much the team cost, will be running one of a possible 34 expansion franchises for next season.
NEWS
By Henry Weinstein and Henry Weinstein,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 24, 2004
The U.S. criminal justice system relies too heavily on imprisoning people and needs to consider more effective alternatives, according to a study released yesterday by the American Bar Association, the nation's largest lawyers' organization. "For more than 20 years, we've gotten tougher on crime," said former Detroit mayor and current ABA President Dennis W. Archer. But it is unclear, Archer said, whether America is any safer for having 2.1 million people currently behind bars. "We can no longer sit by as more and more people - particularly in minority communities - are sent away for longer and longer periods of time while we make it more and more difficult for them to return to society after they serve their time," Archer said at a Washington, D.C., news conference.
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