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By Melody Holmes and Melody Holmes,SUN STAFF | July 5, 1999
The harsh words of critics, angry e-mails, nasty letters -- nothing seems to be able to unwrap Aaron McGruder's fingers from around the pen he uses to create not only cartoons, but controversy. McGruder, of Columbia, is the creator of "The Boondocks," a new comic strip about two black kids from Chicago, Huey and Riley, who move far from their urban element into a predominantly white suburb. In the 2 1/2 months the strip has been on newspaper comics pages -- including The Sun's -- 24-year-old McGruder has endured a lifetime's worth of criticism.
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By Melody Holmes and Melody Holmes,SUN STAFF | July 5, 1999
The harsh words of critics, angry e-mails, nasty letters -- nothing seems to be able to unwrap Aaron McGruder's fingers from around the pen he uses to create not only cartoons, but controversy. McGruder, of Columbia, is the creator of "The Boondocks," a new comic strip about two black kids from Chicago, Huey and Riley, who move far from their urban element into a predominantly white suburb. In the 2 1/2 months the strip has been on newspaper comics pages -- including The Sun's -- 24-year-old McGruder has endured a lifetime's worth of criticism.
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NEWS
June 12, 1999
`Boondocks': Racist or revelatory? K. A. Rupert's letter " `Boondocks' strip found offensive and racist" (May 30) raised important issues about the comic strip. But, as an African-American/black American/person of color (or whatever the politically correct designation is this week), I find that the strip's message resonates. It is satirical, but art imitates life. I identify with the characters, Huey and Riley, and how they are portrayed. Unless you are a "person of color," perhaps you cannot relate to the characters and their interaction with people in their neighborhood (particularly, the strip when a person walked into the street to avoid contact with Riley)
NEWS
June 12, 1999
`Boondocks': Racist or revelatory? K. A. Rupert's letter " `Boondocks' strip found offensive and racist" (May 30) raised important issues about the comic strip. But, as an African-American/black American/person of color (or whatever the politically correct designation is this week), I find that the strip's message resonates. It is satirical, but art imitates life. I identify with the characters, Huey and Riley, and how they are portrayed. Unless you are a "person of color," perhaps you cannot relate to the characters and their interaction with people in their neighborhood (particularly, the strip when a person walked into the street to avoid contact with Riley)
NEWS
April 1, 2006
Note to readers: Aaron McGruder, creator of The Boondocks comic strip, is taking a six-month sabbatical.
FEATURES
April 19, 1999
Beginning today, "Boondocks" joins The Sun's comics lineup, appearing both in the daily pages and Sunday's color comics package. The new strip about an African-American family that moves to the suburbs is young, fresh and edgy. Its hip-hop characters and rapid-fire banter are the creation of Columbia resident Aaron McGruder. To make room for it, The Sun has eliminated "Andy Capp," whose original creator died last year.Pub Date: 04/19/99
NEWS
April 24, 2005
THE QUESTION: WHO ARE SOME OF COLUMBIA'S MOST FAMOUS PAST RESIDENTS? The planned community of Columbia has been home to an array of personalities. Aaron McGruder, creator of "The Boondocks" comic strip, is a native of the town. Actor Edward Norton -- grandson of Columbia developer James W. Rouse -- also grew up in Columbia and attended the Columbia Center for Theatrical Arts, a nonprofit children's acting school and summer camp. Then there's Linda R. Tripp, whose secret recordings of White House intern Monica Lewinsky led to a presidential impeachment.
NEWS
November 3, 2001
Double standard makes Israel villain A country under siege by terrorism sends its troops to another land, drops bombs across the region, places ground troops on foreign soil, and attempts to bring "evildoers" to justice "dead or alive" to protect itself. Sounds tough, but pretty logical in the scheme of things. Another country under siege by terrorism (for a lot longer than the first) puts its troops into its own cities, attempts to bring terrorists to justice "dead or alive" to protect itself, and states that despite all the terrorism over the last year, it will remove its troops immediately if the perpetrators of the most recent heinous act of terrorism are brought to justice.
NEWS
By Narda Zacchino | June 21, 1999
DOES "The Boondocks," a new comic-strip featuring black characters and written and drawn by a black artist, succeed in exploring racial issues -- or is it just racist?Since the Los Angeles Times introduced the strip April 19, about 250 readers have telephoned or written to comment. Many people passionately criticize it as racist and accuse it of promoting violence and negative stereotypes of blacks. But an almost equal number say the strip portrays their lives accurately and with humor and critically exposes stereotypes.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | July 10, 1999
READ THIS paper's "Letters to the Editor" page, and you'll learn that the controversy over the syndicated comic strip "The Boondocks" has not abated. One letter writer even challenged me to write a column about how the strip is detrimental to the image of blacks.Here's an alert for all those upset over "The Boondocks." All your protests have done is gain Aaron McGruder's comic strip one more fan. "The Boondocks" is now the only comic strip I read on a regular basis.The strip's detractors have called it racist and demeaning to blacks.
NEWS
By Larry Atkins | November 6, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - Since Sept. 11, the American media have aired a lot of controversial opinions: Give peace a chance. President Bush is mishandling the war. Let's start deporting Arabs and drop nuclear bombs on Afghanistan. The United States should stop its unilateral support of Israel. These might be unpopular opinions to many, but should columnists and journalists be excoriated if they express them in their articles? Free speech by journalists is essential in our society, but in the aftermath of Sept.
FEATURES
March 1, 2006
Hilary Swank will be both muse and spokeswoman for a new women's fragrance by Guerlain to be launched this year. In making the announcement Monday, Guerlain described the 31-year-old actress as a "radiant and natural beauty" who does not conform to stereotypes. Guerlain said it has a three-year contract with Swank, but a spokeswoman declined to comment on the details of the deal or the fragrance. `Boondocks' on hiatus Aaron McGruder, creator of The Boondocks newspaper strip, will take a six-month sabbatical from the politically charged comic beginning March 27. The strip is due to return in October.
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