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Aaron Copland

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NEWS
December 5, 1990
Composer Aaron Copland was as old as the century and wrote the music that immortalized him by his (and the century's) mid-forties. He died two weeks after his 90th birthday party.Mr. Copland wrote two strands of music. The first was up-to-the-minute, at least the minute of the 1920s when his education in composition took place. It was difficult, intellectual, modernist and had a lot to say to other composers and the musically literate. The other, inspired by his populist politics and his need to earn a living, was melodically accessible to all.And when they are played, listeners say "American!"
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NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | March 31, 2014
If there's strength in numbers, the New York Chamber Soloists are in great shape. This 13-member ensemble of strings, winds, piano and harpsichord is large by chamber music standards, so it promises to assert itself on stage for a Candlelight Concert Society program on Saturday, April 5, at 7 p.m. at Howard Community College's Smith Theatre. On the scene for over five decades, the New York Chamber Soloists have performed for Candlelight before. The group's upcoming "American Classics" program features modern American composers.
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NEWS
December 4, 1990
In a sense, Aaron Copland was to the 20th century what Walt Whitman was to the 19th. What Whitman did through poetry, Copland did through music -- celebrate the grandeur and majesty of the American nation, the vigor and optimism of the American people.Like Bartok and Sibelius, Chopin and Tchaikovsky, Copland will be forever linked with the music of his nation and his people. His life and work was truly, a "Fanfare for the Common Man."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2013
He may have been first in the hearts of his countrymen, but George Washington has not necessarily been first in the minds of composers. This makes the National Symphony Orchestra's premiere at the Kennedy Center Thursday night of the distinctively titled "george WASHINGTON" by Roger Reynolds all the more newsy. When you think of great American presidents in orchestral contexts, the name of Abe Lincoln is likely to come most readily to mind, thanks to Aaron Copland's ever-popular "Lincoln Portrait.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | December 3, 1990
WHEN AARON COPLAND was a young man, he studied music under the composer Rubin Goldmark. Because Goldmark's heroes were Beethoven, Wagner and Fuchs, wrote one biographer, the independent Copland became enamored of composers like Mussorgsky, Debussy, Ravel and Scriabin.There was something always fresh and individual about Aaron Copland, who died yesterday of pneumonia at a hospital in Tarrytown, N.Y., not far from his Peekskill home. He had recently suffered two strokes. He was a man many 20th century musicians contend was America's finest composer, classical or otherwise.
FEATURES
By John von Rhein and John von Rhein,Chicago Tribune | November 14, 1990
The music world has always prized its elder statesmen, though seldom when they were alive and functioning and able to appreciate the attention.Our need for such father-figures has perhaps never been greater than at present, when there are so few around. Among the senior American composers, Leonard Bernstein and Virgil Thomson are both gone. Elliott Carter, still active at 81, and William Schuman, 80, are respected figures, although neither precisely qualifies as a household eminence.That leaves Aaron Copland.
EXPLORE
April 19, 2012
Celebrate the spirit as "Dancing Hearts" presents "Classical Rocks," Sunday, April 22 at 7 p.m. at Resurrection Church, 3315 Greencastle Road, in Burtonsville. Enjoy works such as Aaron Copland's evocative Duo, Scott Joplin's irresistible Rags and the soulful tango music of Astor Piazzolla. The program features flutist Karen Johnson, pianist Carlos-Cesar Rodriguez and percussionist John Kilkenny. Concert is part of the Living Arts Concert Series. A reception follows the concert.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 19, 2000
The Columbia Orchestra and its conductor, Jason Love, have designated their concerts of 2000-2001 as "An American Century Season." True to that spirit, the orchestra will open its 23rd year of concertizing Saturday evening with a program of works by Aaron Copland, the most quintessentially American composer of them all. Copland's "Fanfare for the Common Man," "Lincoln Portrait" and Suite from "Our Town" will be performed at the 8 p.m. concert in Jim...
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik | May 26, 2002
The relationship between television and national memory almost always makes for fascinating holiday viewing. But rarely is the history remembered on screen as heartbreakingly close to home for those in the audience as "In Memoriam: New York City, 9/11/01" (HBO, 9 p.m.) - a record of that horrible day as seen through the eyes of former Mayor Rudolph Giuliani and more than 100 of the citizens and workers of that city who bore witness. A body of great film and television documentary is already growing up around the terrorist attacks and our responses in the minutes, hours and days immediately after.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 3, 1998
This week should prove an embarrassment of riches musically.Tonight at 8: 15, the newly formed Towson University Chamber Orchestra makes its debut in the university's Center for the Arts Concert Hall. With Mark McCoy on the podium, the orchestra will perform Bach's Brandenburg Concerto No. 5, Milhaud's "La Creation du Monde" and works by Stravinsky.Tickets, at $4 and $6, are available at the Center for the Arts box office or by calling 410-830-2787.Wednesday night at 8 p.m., Benjamin Pasternack, the newest member of the Peabody Conservatory's piano faculty, will give his first solo recital in Friedberg Hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2013
If there is a single work that captures the essence of America in sound and movement, it's "Appalachian Spring," the ballet with music by Aaron Copland and choreography by Martha Graham that premiered in 1944 at the Library of Congress. Although the sonic part of the piece is never out of earshot, thanks to the perennially performed orchestral suite Copland fashioned from the score, the opportunity to experience the music and dance in its original form doesn't come around every day. Since last fall, students at the Baltimore School for the Arts have been delving into the ballet from every angle, preparing for "An Appalachian Spring Festival," an interdisciplinary project that includes an art exhibit, a concert and panel discussions.
EXPLORE
April 19, 2012
Celebrate the spirit as "Dancing Hearts" presents "Classical Rocks," Sunday, April 22 at 7 p.m. at Resurrection Church, 3315 Greencastle Road, in Burtonsville. Enjoy works such as Aaron Copland's evocative Duo, Scott Joplin's irresistible Rags and the soulful tango music of Astor Piazzolla. The program features flutist Karen Johnson, pianist Carlos-Cesar Rodriguez and percussionist John Kilkenny. Concert is part of the Living Arts Concert Series. A reception follows the concert.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2012
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra will be jetting to the West Coast this week for a six-day, three-city tour - its first extended outing since Marin Alsop was named music director five years ago. The tour, which begins Wednesday, opens with a concert in Orange County, Calif., and concludes with one in Eugene, Ore. Between those performances will be a three-day residency at the University of California at Berkeley. "Artistically, it's great for the orchestra, because we get to play in a different hall every day," said Alsop.
NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | April 18, 2009
Ideally, concertgoers in this country would know and love at least two big, hearty all-American symphonies - I'd vote for No. 2 by Charles Ives and No. 3 by Aaron Copland - as deeply as they embrace European classics. But that's not likely to happen if our orchestras don't make more room for them. Although the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra enjoys a solid reputation for its support of American music, it has programmed Copland's Third only four times in the past four decades and has never played Ives' Second.
NEWS
By GARRISON KEILLOR | January 22, 2009
One simply wanted to be present. Freezing cold or not, a crowd of 2 million, whatever - solemn warnings about tight security, long lines, traffic jams, cell phones not working. In the end, one wanted to be there on the Mall before the Capitol on Tuesday at noon amid the jubilant throng and see the man take the oath of office - our first genuine author-president. So I hitchhiked a ride in the middle of the night on a jet heading to Baltimore and got to the train station at 5 a.m., and already the platform was packed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | October 11, 2007
The iconic 1939 World's Fair, the last hopeful celebration before war would change everything, was a showcase for any number of forward-looking products, ideas and dreams - "the world of tomorrow." Among the many attractions at the event was a documentary called The City. Made expressly for the fair, it addressed a potent issue of the day - how excessive, unregulated urbanization limited the quality of life. Making the movie all the more effective was its distinctly American music, composed by a man who was then only just beginning to enter the public consciousness.
NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | April 18, 2009
Ideally, concertgoers in this country would know and love at least two big, hearty all-American symphonies - I'd vote for No. 2 by Charles Ives and No. 3 by Aaron Copland - as deeply as they embrace European classics. But that's not likely to happen if our orchestras don't make more room for them. Although the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra enjoys a solid reputation for its support of American music, it has programmed Copland's Third only four times in the past four decades and has never played Ives' Second.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler | September 8, 1991
One of the best things about living in Baltimore is that you can get to New York in 2 1/2 hours, Washington in 45 minutes and Philadelphia in 75. Here is a sampling of the many concerts in those cities worth making the trip for:WASHINGTON*Nobody plays Mozart's piano concertos better than Murray Perahia, who will perform and conduct three of them (K. 413, 482 and 503) with the Orpheus Chamber Ensemble at the Kennedy Center on Oct. 6.NEW YORK*The great Kurt Masur is the New York Philharmonic's new music director, and his presence has made the orchestra a hot ticket for the first time since the Bernstein era ended more than 20 years ago. One of Masur's greatest strengths is Bruckner, and it's no accident that this composer's mighty Symphony No. 7 -- along with music by John Adams and Aaron Copland -- is featured in the orchestra's first concerts with Masur (Sept.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 30, 2004
According to conventional wisdom, Aaron Copland's only full-length opera, The Tender Land, just doesn't cut it. Too static. Too much like one of his Americana ballets, only with words. Not enough story, character development, or truly gripping drama. A very unsatisfying ending. Well, conventional wisdom has been known to be wrong before, and it's wrong in this case. If you don't believe me, just check out Opera Vivente's affecting presentation of the piece. No, you won't come away thinking The Tender Land deserves to be ranked alongside La Boheme, but you're likely to end up with a new - or renewed - appreciation for Copland.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham and Michael Pakenham,Sun Books Editor | January 25, 2004
I am not a credible critic of a great deal of the fiction held sacred by the magistrates and myrmidons of many of this nation's schools of writing - and by small literary journals inhabited by them. To the extent that I read what often is called "experimental" and sometimes "postmodernist" fiction, self-referential insistences tend to make me queasy. Writers writing about writers writing of writing's deep agonies. That sort of thing. Thus prejudiced, I am of a mind to conclude that Vanishing Point, by David Markson (Shoemaker & Hoard, 208 pages, $15)
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