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BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2011
AAI Corp., the Hunt Valley company known for its Shadow spy plane, notified 50 employees Thursday that they are being laid off in the next two weeks. Anna-Maria Palmer, AAI's vice president of human resources, said Thursday that those positions were being eliminated to reduce job overlaps and to be more efficient. AAI employs 1,600 workers in Hunt Valley. Palmer said affected workers were encouraged to apply for 40 job openings in Hunt Valley as well as 140 openings at AAI offices throughout the country.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Edgar H. German Jr., an electrical engineer who founded GT-Tech Inc., died Friday at Maryland Shock Trauma Center of injuries suffered in an Aug.1 automobile accident in Reisterstown. He was 82. The son of Edgar H. German Sr., director of public relations for Baltimore Gas & Electric Co., and Nellie Maydwell German, a homemaker, Edgar Hobbs German Jr. was born in Baltimore and raised on Cliftmont Avenue near Clifton Park. After graduating in 1950 from Polytechnic Institute, where he had played varsity lacrosse and football, he went to work as an electronics technician at the Johns Hopkins Radiation Laboratory.
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BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2011
AAI Corp., the Hunt Valley company most known for its Shadow spy plane, is being split into three separate units by its parent company. Textron Inc., which has owned AAI since 2007, said it was dividing the company to make it more efficient and to better serve customers. The new units are: AAI Unmanned Aircraft Systems, AAI Test & Training and AAI Logistics & Technical Services. Each unit will be headed by separate senior vice presidents and general managers. Ellen Lord, AAI's current senior vice president and general manager, will now lead Textron Defense Systems.
FEATURES
By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2013
Date: June 22, 2013 Her story: Pam Smith, 29, grew up in Baltimore. She is a manager of engineering support at AAI Corp. in Cockeysville. Her mother, Barbara Smith, works in the financial aid office at Goucher College in Towson, and her father, George Smith, is a specialist for learning and development at Verizon. His story: Max Zdunowski, 34, is originally from Homestead, Fla., but grew up on the Eastern Shore. He is a software engineer at AAI Corp. His mother, Ruth Pier, lives in Denton.
NEWS
March 7, 2003
Carroll F. Hartlove, 70, AAI Corp. manager Carroll F. Hartlove, former manager of mechanical support systems for AAI Corp., died Feb. 28 of heart failure at Franklin Square Hospital Center. The Perry Hall resident was 70. Born and reared in Highlandtown, Mr. Hartlove was a 1951 graduate of Patterson Park High School. After serving in the Army for two years, he began mechanical engineering studies at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in Blacksburg, where he earned his bachelor's degree in 1960.
BUSINESS
By Jon Morgan | January 18, 1992
AAI Corp., trying to lessen its reliance on federal contracts, has made its second acquisition in six months aimed at beefing up its commercial business.The Hunt Valley-based company on Thursday acquired ACL Technologies Inc. of Santa Ana, Calif., a leader in the design and manufacture of hydraulic testing systems.ACL is now a wholly owned subsidiary known as AAI/ACL Technologies. The new unit's headquarters will remain in California, but a new president will be appointed by AAI."This is a significant opportunity for us," said Paul J. Michaud, vice president of finance for AAI, which is a subsidiary of United Industrial Corp.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2004
Robert B. Chapman III, a former president and a co-founder of AAI Corp. who had a second career as a college vice president, died of pneumonia Saturday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 86 and a longtime resident of Lutherville before moving three years ago to Oak Crest Village. Born in Baltimore and raised in the 2400 block of Maryland Ave., he was a 1935 graduate of Polytechnic Institute and earned a civil engineering degree from the Johns Hopkins University. In the late 1930s, he joined John E. Greiner Co. as a structural engineer and designed a span of the U.S. 40 bridge over the Susquehanna River at Havre de Grace.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Sun Staff Writer | June 28, 1994
AAI Corp., the struggling Cockeysville-based defense arm of United Industrial Corp., announced a major restructuring yesterday aimed at reducing its operating costs and making the company more competitive in both its military and new commercial markets.In what has to be good news for an already nervous work force, the company estimated that the reorganization will eliminate only about 10 jobs. AAI, one of the fastest growing companies in Maryland during the defense buildup of the Reagan administration, has eliminated more than 2,000 jobs in recent years, including about 100 in the past two months.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | October 16, 1993
United Industrial Corp. has picked Richard E. Erkeneff, a senior executive of McDonnell Douglas Corp., to head its struggling AAI Corp. subsidiary in Cockeysville.Mr. Erkeneff succeeds Thomas V. Murphy, who resigned under fire as president and chief executive in April following a sharp drop in AAI's earnings. The falloff was caused partly by a $23 million corporate restructuring and the disappointing performance of a commercial flight simulation company AAI acquired two years ago to lessen its dependence on a declining Pentagon budget.
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood JTC and Liz Atwood JTC,Evening Sun Staff | March 5, 1991
Maryland defense contractors looking to diversify their markets are reaping rewards from a $16 billion effort to improve the safety and efficiency of the nation's air traffic control system.Hunt Valley-based AAI Corp. recently landed a contract worth more than $200 million to produce the Automated Surface Observation System, which will provide instantaneous weather information to pilots and air traffic controllers.The Westinghouse Electronics Systems Group in Linthicum has contracts worth more than $1 billion to produce four kinds of radar systems for commercial airports around the country.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2012
Industrial employment in Maryland and Washington, D.C., fell 2.3 percent in a year-over-year period ending in May, with layoffs at defense contractor AAI Corp. and the closure of the Solo Cup plant in Owings Mills contributing to job losses, Manufacturers' News Inc. reported Monday. The region lost 4,419 jobs during the 12 months, according to an annual industrial directory published by Manufacturers' News. Baltimore remained the area's biggest city for manufacturing employment, with 31,354 workers and a 3.1 percent loss of jobs.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2012
Salvatore Joseph "Joe" DeMarco, a commercial artist and former manager of art services for AAI Corp. who was also widely known for his detailed drawings of World War I aircraft, died Friday of lung cancer at Gilchrist Hospice in Towson. The White Marsh resident was 93. The son of a dentist and a homemaker, Mr. DeMarco was born and raised on Lyndhurst Street in West Baltimore. He attended St. Bernadine parochial school and ended his formal education when he was 14. "His father died, and he had to go to work to help support his family.
NEWS
Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2011
Michael G. Delss, a materials coordinator for AAI Corp. and an avid fisherman and crabber, died Aug. 23 from complications of diabetes at his Essex home. He was 52. Michael George Delss, the son of a brick mason and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in Essex. He was a 1978 graduate of Kenwood High School. "While he was in high school he worked as a brick mason with his father," said his wife of 14 years, the former Leslie Elaine Kolakowski. In 1985, Mr. Delss went to work for the Linen Locker as a distribution manager.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 18, 2011
Edward T. Kusterer, a retired mechanical engineer and World War II veteran, died April 4 of heart failure at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. He was 94. Mr. Kusterer was born in Richmond, Va., and moved to the city's Pimlico neighborhood in 1918. He was a 1934 graduate of Calvert Hall College High School. He was working as a bank teller at the old Maryland Trust Co. on Eutaw Street when he was drafted in 1941 into the Army Air Corps. After being commissioned a second lieutenant, he joined the 99th Bomb Group, 346th Squadron in Oran, Algeria.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2011
AAI Corp., the Hunt Valley company known for its Shadow spy plane, notified 50 employees Thursday that they are being laid off in the next two weeks. Anna-Maria Palmer, AAI's vice president of human resources, said Thursday that those positions were being eliminated to reduce job overlaps and to be more efficient. AAI employs 1,600 workers in Hunt Valley. Palmer said affected workers were encouraged to apply for 40 job openings in Hunt Valley as well as 140 openings at AAI offices throughout the country.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2011
AAI Corp., the Hunt Valley company most known for its Shadow spy plane, is being split into three separate units by its parent company. Textron Inc., which has owned AAI since 2007, said it was dividing the company to make it more efficient and to better serve customers. The new units are: AAI Unmanned Aircraft Systems, AAI Test & Training and AAI Logistics & Technical Services. Each unit will be headed by separate senior vice presidents and general managers. Ellen Lord, AAI's current senior vice president and general manager, will now lead Textron Defense Systems.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2002
United Industrial Corp., the parent company of Hunt Valley-based AAI Corp., announced yesterday that it is "evaluating alternatives to enhance shareholder value" - including a possible sale of the company. AAI, which manufactures unmanned aircraft and training simulators for the military, accounts for roughly 85 percent of its parent company's business. United Industrial has long considered AAI its core enterprise and has tried to sell off unrelated businesses in the past. But yesterday's disclosure, including an announcement that the company had hired the investment banking firm Wachovia Corp.
BUSINESS
By States News Service | February 25, 1991
Federal Contracts Report is a weekly summary of selected contracts recently awarded by the federal government to companies and other vendors of the Baltimore area.* Francis Scott Key Medical Center of Baltimore won a $2,318,054 contract from the National Institutes of Health to provide miscellaneous services.* Johns Hopkins University of Laurel won a $60,053,799 contract from the Navy to provide research, development, engineering and technical services supporting tactical strategic systems, space science, geophysics, biophysics and micro-electronics.
BUSINESS
By ALLISON CONNOLLY and ALLISON CONNOLLY,SUN REPORTER | May 9, 2006
Shares of United Industrial Corp. tumbled more than 20 percent yesterday after the Hunt Valley company reported first-quarter profit down nearly one-third from a year ago. While the manufacturer of unmanned aerial vehicles and aircraft training simulators saw a 28 percent increase in revenue for the quarter, officials blamed the sharp drop in profit on a property sale a year ago that boosted earnings. Excluding the one-time gain, the company missed analysts' forecasts by 5 cents a share.
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