Advertisement
HomeCollections6th Corps
IN THE NEWS

6th Corps

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Regina Puleo and Regina Puleo,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 8, 2002
Bloody Lane was the site of many casualties suffered during Gen. Robert E. Lee's first attempt to press the war onto Northern soil and the scene of great courage displayed by Confederate officers and soldiers, such as Col. John B. Gordon and his 6th Alabama Regiment. Lee, commander of the Army of Northern Virginia, and Maj. Gen. Daniel Harvey Hill warned Gordon in the early hours of Sept. 17, 1862, that Union troops were heading for his position. In his Reminiscences of the Civil War, Gordon wrote: "I called aloud to these officers [Lee and Hill]
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Katherine Tiernan and Katherine Tiernan,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2003
Maj. Gen. Joseph B. Kershaw had a distinguished military career in the Confederate army, the high point being his role in the surprise attack at Cedar Creek. Kershaw was a South Carolina lawyer who attained his rank in the early days of the Civil War through his social status. His competent fighting throughout the war helped him rise through the ranks to become a major general. Under the command of Lt. Gen. Jubal A. Early, the Confederate army launched a coordinated attack against the Union troops in the pre-dawn hours of Oct. 19, 1864.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Katherine Tiernan and Katherine Tiernan,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2003
Maj. Gen. Joseph B. Kershaw had a distinguished military career in the Confederate army, the high point being his role in the surprise attack at Cedar Creek. Kershaw was a South Carolina lawyer who attained his rank in the early days of the Civil War through his social status. His competent fighting throughout the war helped him rise through the ranks to become a major general. Under the command of Lt. Gen. Jubal A. Early, the Confederate army launched a coordinated attack against the Union troops in the pre-dawn hours of Oct. 19, 1864.
NEWS
By Regina Puleo and Regina Puleo,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 8, 2002
Bloody Lane was the site of many casualties suffered during Gen. Robert E. Lee's first attempt to press the war onto Northern soil and the scene of great courage displayed by Confederate officers and soldiers, such as Col. John B. Gordon and his 6th Alabama Regiment. Lee, commander of the Army of Northern Virginia, and Maj. Gen. Daniel Harvey Hill warned Gordon in the early hours of Sept. 17, 1862, that Union troops were heading for his position. In his Reminiscences of the Civil War, Gordon wrote: "I called aloud to these officers [Lee and Hill]
NEWS
By Regina Puleo and Regina Puleo,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 25, 2002
As the fighting raged at Harper's Ferry, Union Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan sought to relieve the embattled garrison there by forcing his way through the Confederate screen at Crampton's Gap on South Mountain, splitting Gen. Robert E. Lee's invading army north of the Potomac in the process. Union Maj. Gen. William B. Franklin's 6th Corps arrived at the pass about noon Sept. 14, finding it lightly defended by cavalry pickets from Maj. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart's division and infantry from Maj. Gen. Lafayette McLaws' division.
NEWS
By Darl Stephenson and Darl Stephenson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 10, 2004
In the early morning of Oct. 19, 1864, the Confederate Army of the Valley led by Lt. Gen. Jubal A. Early attacked the Union Army of the Shenandoah under Maj. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan by surprise at Cedar Creek. The first unit of the Union Army to feel the wrath of that Confederate attack was the little "Army of West Virginia" (AWV) or 8th Corps led by Brig. Gen. George Crook, now much reduced in numbers after hard campaigning and fighting since May. It was hardly an army and not much of a corps because of these reduced numbers.
NEWS
By Stacy Malyil and Stacy Malyil,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 6, 2002
Maj. Gen. Joseph B. Kershaw's part in the surprise attack on Union forces at Cedar Creek was to cross the creek and drive back the Union center. The planning for Kershaw's advance occurred the night before. Confederate Maj. Gen. John B. Gordon and mapmaker Jedediah Hotchkiss had climbed to the top of Massanutten Mountain to Signal Knob on Oct. 17, surveying the position of the Union army at Cedar Creek. This climb took several hours and, once at the top of the signal station, Gordon and Hotchkiss devised a plan of attack.
NEWS
By Jack Gorman and Jack Gorman,Special to the Sun | October 15, 2000
The morning of Oct. 19, 1864, had gone badly for the Union army at Cedar Creek, but about 10:30 a.m., after he heard sounds of battle and pushed his horse on a much-publicized hard ride from Winchester, Va., Maj. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan arrived to rally his troops. At the time of Sheridan's arrival, only the 6th Corps and the adjacent cavalry had formed a line of battle to put up a fight, and after several attacks, the Confederates had halted in order to regroup for a seemingly easy victory.
NEWS
By Nick Alexopulos and Nick Alexopulos,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2003
Occupied by the summer heat and a siege at Petersburg, Va., Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant underestimated the importance of the Shenandoah Valley Campaign's role as part of his grand military offensive in 1864. According to Jeffry D. Wert in his 1987 book From Winchester to Cedar Creek: The Shenandoah Campaign of 1864, it was not until late summer that Grant understood "if the summer stalemate in Virginia were to be broken, it would be beyond the Blue Ridge Mountains in the Shenandoah Valley."
NEWS
May 21, 1999
The Washington Star of last evening says:A messenger got in last night from the army who left Spotsylvania Court House yesterday at twelve o'clock, and came on horseback to Aquia Creek, and thence came up on a gunboat. At twelve o'clock yesterday a heavy fight was going on a Spotsylvania Court House. we held the place at that hour, and Lee gave evidence of being weakened and of falling back. The messenger had an escort of one hundred and fifty cavalry, and guerrillas were frequently encountered on the way, and it is not improbable that many of the escort were captured when returning to the army.
NEWS
By Regina Puleo and Regina Puleo,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 25, 2002
As the fighting raged at Harper's Ferry, Union Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan sought to relieve the embattled garrison there by forcing his way through the Confederate screen at Crampton's Gap on South Mountain, splitting Gen. Robert E. Lee's invading army north of the Potomac in the process. Union Maj. Gen. William B. Franklin's 6th Corps arrived at the pass about noon Sept. 14, finding it lightly defended by cavalry pickets from Maj. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart's division and infantry from Maj. Gen. Lafayette McLaws' division.
NEWS
By Michelle Lawyer and Michelle Lawyer,Special to the Sun | October 10, 1999
Organizers in Middletown, Va., are putting the final touches on preparations for the 135th anniversary of the Civil War battle of Cedar Creek. The event, to be held Oct. 15-17, is expected to attract up to 6,000 re-enactors.Admission to the re-enactment is $20 for all three days; $15 for a weekend pass; and $10 daily. Children 12 years old and under are admitted free. Parking is free.To obtain tickets, contact the Cedar Creek Battlefield Foundation at P.O. Box 229, Middletown, Va. 22645, or call 540-869-2064.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | October 15, 1998
Here is a chronology of events in the 1864 Shenandoah Valley campaign leading up to the Battle of Cedar Creek:May 14: Union Maj. Gen. Franz Sigel, commander of the Department of West Virginia, moved south in the Shenandoah Valley with 6,500 men, facing cavalry opposition by Brig. Gen. John D. Imboden. Maj. Gen. John C. Breckenridge brought in about 5,000 Confederate troops to support Imboden, and a skirmish at Rude's Hill signaled Confederate resolve to defend the valley.Battle of New MarketMay 15: Battle of New Market, Va. Breckenridge gathered the Confederate forces, including 247 cadets from Virginia Military Institute, and met Sigel at New Market.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.