Advertisement
HomeCollections5th District
IN THE NEWS

5th District

NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Dennis O'Brien and Jonathan D. Rockoff and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2002
Kenneth N. Oliver, a former planning board chairman, appeared to narrowly defeat Penny McCrimmon last night in the Democratic primary that could lead to the election of Baltimore County's first African-American council member. Unofficial results showed Oliver was ahead of McCrimmon, a longtime community and Democratic Party activist, by 452 votes in the 4th District. The district, which centers around Randallstown and includes Woodlawn, Granite and parts of Owings Mills, was reconfigured during redistricting to have a black voting majority.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2002
Two Baltimore County Council incumbents are facing primary challenges in the reconfigured 5th District, and will face one another in the November general election if they win on Tuesday. The toughest fight appears to be in the Republican primary, where Councilman Wayne M. Skinner is facing off against Del. James F. Ports Jr., who rose to prominence as a leader in the fight against an unpopular property condemnation initiative. The race in the 5th District -- which includes parts of Towson, Perry Hall and Carney -- got off to an uncertain start.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2002
Daniel E. McKew, a businessman who also serves as chairman of the Injured Workers Insurance Fund board of directors, announced yesterday he is running for the 3rd District seat on the Baltimore County Council. McKew ran unsuccessfully for the House of Delegates in 1990 and 1994 as a Democrat, the second time as an ally of state Sen. Thomas L. Bromwell. He switched his affiliation to Republican for this race because of GOP dominance in the north county district. That means he will face incumbent T. Bryan McIntire in the September primary.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | April 30, 2002
Del. James F. Ports Jr., the Perry Hall Republican who debated County Executive C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger in a series of debates over east-side revitalization, announced yesterday that he will run for County Council in the 5th District. The race is likely to be the most contentious in the county - the redistricting plan the council approved last year having put incumbents Wayne M. Skinner, a Towson Republican, and Vincent J. Gardina, a Perry Hall Democrat, in the same district. Skinner has already filed for re-election, and Gardina appears to be gearing up for a run. Ports had been considering runs for Congress, county executive and County Council, but he said his first priority is helping U.S. Rep. Robert L. Ehrlich, a Republican, win the race for governor.
NEWS
March 26, 2002
Law to run in 1st District as Green Party candidate George Law will kick off his Green Party campaign for a 1st District seat on the Anne Arundel County Council with a spaghetti dinner at 7 p.m. Saturday at the Ferndale Volunteer Fire Department on South Broadview Boulevard. Law has owned and managed Law Brothers Hardware in Ferndale for 24 years. The 1st District seat is held by Councilwoman Pamela G. Beidle. Maloney enters race for 5th District council seat Severna Park resident and business owner George Maloney announced yesterday that he will run for a seat on the Anne Arundel County Council representing the 5th District.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2002
CLARIFICATION An article and a caption under a photograph of Republican Del. Nancy R. Stocksdale on Page 3B Sunday about Carroll's proposed redistricting might have given the impression that Stocksdale has not made up her mind about seeking re-election. She will seek re-election to the Maryland House of Delegates. A slight change in Gov. Parris N. Glendening's legislative redistricting plan for Maryland could leave one of three incumbent Carroll delegates without a job come November. Under the original redistricting plan, three at-large delegates would have represented the redrawn 5th District, which would include a large chunk of Carroll and the northern part of Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | December 19, 2001
South Carroll would get its own new delegate and incumbent members of the county's delegation would represent a large chunk of Baltimore County under a proposed legislative map released yesterday by a Maryland redistricting committee appointed by the governor. Though most Carroll residents would be able to vote for their current representatives in the 2002 election, the new map would blend northern Carroll into a state Senate district with northern Baltimore County, and put South Carroll into a Senate district with Howard County.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2000
Democrat Paul S. Sarbanes, the low-key son of Greek immigrants, became Maryland's first U.S. senator to win a fifth term, and all of the state's House members were re-elected, with GOP Rep. Constance A. Morella fending off a well-funded challenger. Montgomery County Democrat Terry Lierman, the founder of a lobbying firm who lent his campaign more than $1 million, took advantage of an energized Democratic base that came out to support him and the party's presidential candidate, Vice President Al Gore.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2000
Political junkies who enjoy an old-fashioned, kidney-punching, name-calling, insult-trading grudge match should avoid Maryland's 5th District congressional campaign this year. The race has been downright gentlemanly, and most of the blame for that goes to the Republican challenger, Del. Thomas E. Hutchins. He's just one of the nicest guys you'll ever meet. Ask his opponent, Democratic Rep. Steny H. Hoyer. "Tim Hutchins is a nice fellow. This is not a guy who's into attacks," Hoyer said last week after a civil, issues-oriented debate with the former state police captain.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | October 18, 2000
Veteran Democratic Rep. Steny H. Hoyer emerged all but unscathed from a gentlemanly televised debate with Republican challenger Thomas E. "Tim" Hutchins, who sounded mostly positive themes in his uphill race for Maryland's 5th District congressional seat. The debate, taped Monday and televised last night on Maryland Public Television, was the first face-to-face meeting in the low-key campaign between the 10-term congressman and the two-term state delegate from Charles County. The 5th District includes Southern Maryland and parts of Prince George's and Anne Arundel counties.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.