Advertisement
HomeCollections21st Century
IN THE NEWS

21st Century

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 5, 1995
If the House votes to end affirmative action in broadcast licensing, "Republican fingerprints [would be] on the racist card," says an accusing Democratic Rep. Charles Rangel. That kind of rhetoric is not going to make it any easier for Americans of all races and both parties to work out an affirmative action program for the 21st century.Nor is Sen. Phil Gramm's statement to the effect that if elected president his first act will be to end every racial preference he can.Changes in affirmative action are needed.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2014
Are we in the midst of a mini-Shakespeare festival? The area is currently enjoying two innovative productions of works by the Bard: Compass Rose Theater's "Romeo and Juliet" — reviewed here last week — and Annapolis Shakespeare Company's "Hamlet," now playing at Bowie Playhouse. Director Sally Boyett boldly delves into the psyche of Hamlet to accomplish a nearly impossible feat: bringing suspense to this much-told tale of the melancholy Danish prince. Boyett places the character in the 21st century, confronting the mystery of his father's death and his anguish over his mother's hasty marriage to Claudius, the king's brother and Hamlet's uncle.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Richard Louv | July 25, 1996
SAN DIEGO -- Trucks from the water department pulled up on my cul-de-sac. Several guys in hard hats jumped out. They began to mark the street with blue spray paint. Some of them studied books of charts. But one workman walked around holding two bent metal rods, one in each fist, pointed directly ahead of him. He watched the rods intently as they swung left or right or crossed."Just curious. But what are you doing?" I asked.He looked a little sheepish and muttered, "Dowsing."Like most people, I'm somewhat familiar with dowsing (or divining, or water witching, as it is sometimes called)
NEWS
March 24, 2014
In the 21st century there is no need for geographic borders to separate nations. According to United Nations resolutions, people have a human right to nationality, and in Crimea the majority want to be Russian. The world needs to accept that reality. But what do you do with those who want to be Ukrainian in Crimea? Lessons should be learned from past failures, and the India-Pakistan disaster in 1947 comes to mind. In Northern Ireland, some want to be British and others want to be Irish.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Writer | July 30, 1995
The pace of Maryland's growth will slow in the early 21st century as its population ages, according to new long-term projections by the Maryland Office of Planning.The state's population is forecast to increase from 5 million in mid-1995 to 6 million in 2018. Montgomery County is projected to reach a population of 1 million in 2020, the first Maryland jurisdiction to do so.The projections are based on fresh population estimates for mid-1995, which show that Montgomery (810,000) is the state's most populous county.
NEWS
By Christopher Hanson | April 7, 2003
THROUGHOUT THE 20th century, as the weapons we used to fight our wars became increasingly lethal, news coverage of the effects of combat took on an increasingly disjointed and euphemistic quality. In the early days of World War II, CBS radio correspondent Edward R. Murrow reported that the distant explosions from a British bombing raid over Germany resembled "rice on black velvet." In reaction to the more graphic coverage of Vietnam, the Pentagon during Gulf War I restricted access and provided film that made the conflict seem like a video game.
NEWS
By Wayne Hardin and Wayne Hardin,Sun Staff Writer | February 8, 1994
Neatness hardly rates as an emphasis for Robert E. Slavin, one of the country's leading education reformers, in his incredibly cluttered office across from the Johns Hopkins University Homewood tennis courts."
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN REPORTER | July 23, 2006
You don't have to be a Gen Y-er to feel as if you're up on (or is that down with?) the current crazes, technologies and celebrities. But when it comes to actually explaining how plasma TV is better or who Star Jones Reynolds is -- well, that's another thing altogether. Admit it. You're not sure whether South Beach is a fad diet or a new MTV reality show. Or both. And what does DSL stand for, anyway? The following quiz should give you a better idea of just how au courant you really are. We started with a much longer list and winnowed it down to 21 must-know words, terms or names for the 21st century (or at least for 2006)
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | March 17, 1996
Robert D. Kaplan writes lean: "The future steps over the bones of the past before they have been properly buried. A medieval world co-exists with a postmodern one." He is in Cairo, but is addressing virtually the entire nonindustrial world.That sentence is the lens of "The Ends of the Earth: A Journey at the Dawn of the 21st Century" (Random House. 476 pages. $27.50), the new book by Mr. Kaplan, an established journalist who comes into his own with this volume.What is an important book? Ideas are important.
NEWS
By Alvin Toffler and Heidi Toffler | January 10, 1991
IN THE NEXT millennium, the great danger for humanity will not be the conflict between East and West, or even between North and South. It will be the decoupling of the fast world from the slow world.As time itself has become a critical factor of production, the wealth gap has grown rapidly between societies whose accelerative economies are driven by knowledge and advanced technology and those societies whose economies are mired in traditional agriculture or bureaucratic smokestack industry.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
Remember how John Waters hitchhiked across the U.S. in the spring of 2012 -- part of the research, he said, for his next book? Well, the long wait is finally (almost) over. "Carsick: John Waters Hitchhikes Across America" is set to be released June 3 by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. The book, Waters says, will be separated into three parts: -- First, he ruminates over the best rides he could have had (sample from amazon.com's blurb: "a friendly drug dealer hands over piles of cash to finance films with no questions asked")
NEWS
By Jim Clark | February 19, 2014
As parents, we spend countless hours trying to keep our kids balanced, so that they get just the right mix of physical and mental stimulation. Sometimes that means limiting their computer and Internet time so they can play outdoors or focus on something other than a screen. I know I hear myself say this at least three times a week at home with my own two children. But what about kids who don't have as much digital access as ours? What about kids who don't own computers, whose families don't subscribe to broadband at home or who have to go to the library just to finish their homework?
BUSINESS
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun   | December 27, 2013
I have a confession to make. I kind of love Red Lobster. Yes, I live in the land of the jumbo lump crabcakes and fresh rockfish, but there's something oddly comforting for me about the chain restaurant that my dad took me to as a kid. I'm known for forcing my uppity Maryland friends to make the trek to White Marsh or Columbia or now Arundel Mills! (What can I say I'm a fan.) Once a busboy stopped my party from being seated because the table was "still a little buttery. " I loved it. So I have been watching with concern as my favorite chain restaurant has fallen on hard times.
NEWS
September 11, 2013
Most people have apparently made up their minds about what we should do about Syria, but I find myself dithering ( "The decisive moment," Sept. 9). Doing nothing seems like a terrible idea, and military action seems also seems a terrible idea. It comes down to choosing the lesser of two evils, but the perils inherent in either choice are daunting. I pity the leaders of our country who have to make these truly life and death decisions. I do believe that there are some lessons to be learned as the result of this crisis.
NEWS
Letter to The Aegis | August 20, 2013
Editor: For many members of the millennial generation, the current political landscape has discouraged us from becoming involved in the political debate. From health care, to unemployment, and everything in between there seems to be a lack of appetite from our elders to solve some of our nation's biggest problems. Few issues in our nation's current political debate, however, seem to spark more disagreement than climate change. Although many of my fellow millennials, despite political party or ideology, agree that the climate indeed is changing, our political leadership appears unable to meet the challenges of combating this 21st Century problem.
NEWS
July 31, 2013
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., when he addresses the "challenges" facing the Republican party, dodges with the fancy footwork of an adept politician around the painful truth ( "Republican resurgence faces many challenges," July 28). Whatever the impact of the factors he identifies for the failure of the Republican party to gain traction, he avoids the principal challenge they face - their image. Obviously, individual Republicans vary widely in their attitudes and values, but the party as a whole presents to the world an image of negativity that is out of temper with our times.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2014
Are we in the midst of a mini-Shakespeare festival? The area is currently enjoying two innovative productions of works by the Bard: Compass Rose Theater's "Romeo and Juliet" — reviewed here last week — and Annapolis Shakespeare Company's "Hamlet," now playing at Bowie Playhouse. Director Sally Boyett boldly delves into the psyche of Hamlet to accomplish a nearly impossible feat: bringing suspense to this much-told tale of the melancholy Danish prince. Boyett places the character in the 21st century, confronting the mystery of his father's death and his anguish over his mother's hasty marriage to Claudius, the king's brother and Hamlet's uncle.
NEWS
December 12, 1996
HAVING SEIZED enough of "the vital center" to win a second term, President Clinton in his first post-election policy speech, has cast himself as chief proprietor of that crucial political turf.Balancing the budget is his first priority, he says, thus reiterating his claim to a high-profile issue Republicans once monopolized. His will be a government, he says, that is hard to pigeonhole as right or left, and as such will be a frustration for those who try to communicate or describe or (implicitly)
NEWS
June 14, 2013
The recent article on multiculturalism by Bob Ehrlich ("Multiculturalism is the enemy of democracy," June 2) and the response by Wally Pinkard ("America is more than baseball and apple pie," June 7) have opened up a credible discussion on the root causes of political philosophy. I applaud The Sun for offering this polemic for readers to digest and learn from. The advantages of immigration and multiculturalism to the world and the U.S. are so obvious that they do not need discussion. The root cause of the multiculturalism debate is religious secularism and intolerance.
NEWS
May 22, 2013
Recent letters have trashed Maryland as a business friendly state. As the founder of one of Maryland's largest engineering firms employing about 1,000 engineers and scientists, we have found Maryland to be the ideal place to locate and grow a business. Businesses in the 21st century seek good markets, a skilled labor force, good schools and universities and a high quality of life in which to raise a family. Maryland is unparalleled in meeting these requirements. Jack Kinstlinger, Baltimore
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.