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NEWS
March 5, 1995
If the House votes to end affirmative action in broadcast licensing, "Republican fingerprints [would be] on the racist card," says an accusing Democratic Rep. Charles Rangel. That kind of rhetoric is not going to make it any easier for Americans of all races and both parties to work out an affirmative action program for the 21st century.Nor is Sen. Phil Gramm's statement to the effect that if elected president his first act will be to end every racial preference he can.Changes in affirmative action are needed.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 7, 2014
The Maryland Public Service Commission's decision this week to classify the ride-sharing service Uber as a common carrier is probably not the end of the story as to whether the company will continue its operations in Baltimore City and Annapolis. Uber has said it will appeal the decision, and the PSC itself ordered regulators to begin crafting new rules for for-hire companies in a tacit recognition of the changing nature of the industry. Ultimately, what needs to emerge is a compromise that allows consumers to continue to benefit from Uber's innovative business model (and others that may come after it)
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NEWS
By ANDREW LAM | April 17, 1992
The United Nations Environment Program estimates that if the ozone level drops 10 percent, the incidence of melanoma skin cancers will increase 25 percent worldwide. And indeed the ozone layer, according to the U.N., is rapidly being punctured and peeled.There is something apocalyptic in what the numbers suggest, the promise of an ozone-void future.Nocturnes for the 21st century? Imagine, if you will, a retro-future scenario in which our cave-dwelling ancestors' nyctophobia is inverted by future generations.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2014
It is not often that a piece of Maryland architectural history goes on the market, which is one of myriad reasons that the Springfield Estate (also known as Peerce's Plantation) in northern Baltimore County is such a treasure. At a selling price of $1.975 million, this circa-1800 homestead was accurately restored and renovated by a previous owner.  "The original block of the house is a classic and true Federal period residence," said Nancy Hubble, the listing agent with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Writer | July 30, 1995
The pace of Maryland's growth will slow in the early 21st century as its population ages, according to new long-term projections by the Maryland Office of Planning.The state's population is forecast to increase from 5 million in mid-1995 to 6 million in 2018. Montgomery County is projected to reach a population of 1 million in 2020, the first Maryland jurisdiction to do so.The projections are based on fresh population estimates for mid-1995, which show that Montgomery (810,000) is the state's most populous county.
NEWS
By Wayne Hardin and Wayne Hardin,Sun Staff Writer | February 8, 1994
Neatness hardly rates as an emphasis for Robert E. Slavin, one of the country's leading education reformers, in his incredibly cluttered office across from the Johns Hopkins University Homewood tennis courts."
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN REPORTER | July 23, 2006
You don't have to be a Gen Y-er to feel as if you're up on (or is that down with?) the current crazes, technologies and celebrities. But when it comes to actually explaining how plasma TV is better or who Star Jones Reynolds is -- well, that's another thing altogether. Admit it. You're not sure whether South Beach is a fad diet or a new MTV reality show. Or both. And what does DSL stand for, anyway? The following quiz should give you a better idea of just how au courant you really are. We started with a much longer list and winnowed it down to 21 must-know words, terms or names for the 21st century (or at least for 2006)
NEWS
By Christopher Hanson | April 7, 2003
THROUGHOUT THE 20th century, as the weapons we used to fight our wars became increasingly lethal, news coverage of the effects of combat took on an increasingly disjointed and euphemistic quality. In the early days of World War II, CBS radio correspondent Edward R. Murrow reported that the distant explosions from a British bombing raid over Germany resembled "rice on black velvet." In reaction to the more graphic coverage of Vietnam, the Pentagon during Gulf War I restricted access and provided film that made the conflict seem like a video game.
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | March 17, 1996
Robert D. Kaplan writes lean: "The future steps over the bones of the past before they have been properly buried. A medieval world co-exists with a postmodern one." He is in Cairo, but is addressing virtually the entire nonindustrial world.That sentence is the lens of "The Ends of the Earth: A Journey at the Dawn of the 21st Century" (Random House. 476 pages. $27.50), the new book by Mr. Kaplan, an established journalist who comes into his own with this volume.What is an important book? Ideas are important.
NEWS
By Alvin Toffler and Heidi Toffler | January 10, 1991
IN THE NEXT millennium, the great danger for humanity will not be the conflict between East and West, or even between North and South. It will be the decoupling of the fast world from the slow world.As time itself has become a critical factor of production, the wealth gap has grown rapidly between societies whose accelerative economies are driven by knowledge and advanced technology and those societies whose economies are mired in traditional agriculture or bureaucratic smokestack industry.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 23, 2014
When historians get around to appraising the start of the new century, what will they say about it? If circumstances continue as they have been, the period may well be deemed a deep black hole in the political life of this country. From the disputatious presidential election of 2000, in which the supposedly nonpolitical Supreme Court stepped in to decide the winner; to the brutal terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon; to the unwarranted U.S. invasion of Iraq and its disastrous aftermath; to the Great Recession at home; and now the disintegration of the American-backed regime in Iraq, the last nearly 14 years have witnessed a woeful stall in the American dream.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | June 12, 2014
How about some good news for a change? Last month, I wrote about the kidnapping of nearly 300 Nigerian schoolgirls by a band of putative men who style themselves "Boko Haram" -- "Western Education is Forbidden. " Taken in concert with the 2012 shooting of Malala Yousafzai in Pakistan and the 2008 acid attack on Shamsia Husseini in Afghanistan, this latest outrage cements an impression that Islamic extremists are petrified of girls and what they might become with a little education.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 2, 2014
In keeping with his determination to get America off "a perpetual wartime footing" after more than a decade of combat in Iraq and Afghanistan, President Obama's commencement address at West Point was a sobering preview of what lies ahead for the graduates. Before an audience of the newly minted military officers, he sought at length to make the case for a selective response to global and regional challenges. He argued that this country must make hard choices about when and where the nation's might can be exerted as the leading partner in the world community.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2014
The Boathouse Canton is a real beauty. The restaurant and bar, located in the Tindeco Wharf apartment complex, makes excellent use of its waterfront location. From what we saw, people are responding. The restaurant was busy each time we visited, on a late Saturday afternoon, an early weeknight evening and a weekday lunch. The waterfront dining patio, just off the main dining room, looks to be a popular perch, as does the expansive bar area, which appears to be attracting a fairly broad range of age groups But patrons are filling up the dining areas, too, which is a change from when this former power station housed Bay Cafe, a long-running Canton institution that was known for its real palm trees and beach parties.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2014
Are we in the midst of a mini-Shakespeare festival? The area is currently enjoying two innovative productions of works by the Bard: Compass Rose Theater's "Romeo and Juliet" — reviewed here last week — and Annapolis Shakespeare Company's "Hamlet," now playing at Bowie Playhouse. Director Sally Boyett boldly delves into the psyche of Hamlet to accomplish a nearly impossible feat: bringing suspense to this much-told tale of the melancholy Danish prince. Boyett places the character in the 21st century, confronting the mystery of his father's death and his anguish over his mother's hasty marriage to Claudius, the king's brother and Hamlet's uncle.
NEWS
March 24, 2014
In the 21st century there is no need for geographic borders to separate nations. According to United Nations resolutions, people have a human right to nationality, and in Crimea the majority want to be Russian. The world needs to accept that reality. But what do you do with those who want to be Ukrainian in Crimea? Lessons should be learned from past failures, and the India-Pakistan disaster in 1947 comes to mind. In Northern Ireland, some want to be British and others want to be Irish.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2014
Are we in the midst of a mini-Shakespeare festival? The area is currently enjoying two innovative productions of works by the Bard: Compass Rose Theater's "Romeo and Juliet" — reviewed here last week — and Annapolis Shakespeare Company's "Hamlet," now playing at Bowie Playhouse. Director Sally Boyett boldly delves into the psyche of Hamlet to accomplish a nearly impossible feat: bringing suspense to this much-told tale of the melancholy Danish prince. Boyett places the character in the 21st century, confronting the mystery of his father's death and his anguish over his mother's hasty marriage to Claudius, the king's brother and Hamlet's uncle.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
Remember how John Waters hitchhiked across the U.S. in the spring of 2012 -- part of the research, he said, for his next book? Well, the long wait is finally (almost) over. "Carsick: John Waters Hitchhikes Across America" is set to be released June 3 by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. The book, Waters says, will be separated into three parts: -- First, he ruminates over the best rides he could have had (sample from amazon.com's blurb: "a friendly drug dealer hands over piles of cash to finance films with no questions asked")
NEWS
By Jim Clark | February 19, 2014
As parents, we spend countless hours trying to keep our kids balanced, so that they get just the right mix of physical and mental stimulation. Sometimes that means limiting their computer and Internet time so they can play outdoors or focus on something other than a screen. I know I hear myself say this at least three times a week at home with my own two children. But what about kids who don't have as much digital access as ours? What about kids who don't own computers, whose families don't subscribe to broadband at home or who have to go to the library just to finish their homework?
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