Advertisement
HomeCollections20th Century Art
IN THE NEWS

20th Century Art

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | April 19, 1992
Housing the arts is an art in itself, and in tough economic times it can take a feat of magic, too. So when Mayor Kurt Schmoke flatly rejected a recommendation that Baltimore cut off all funding for the arts as a cost-saving measure, the action sent a vote of confidence to arts organizations throughout the city.But none has more reason to celebrate than the Baltimore Museum of Art, which is poised to break ground within a month for a $7 million wing for 20th century art. Its staff and directors have been working for six years to raise enough money to build the addition, now scheduled for completion within two years on the last developable parcel on the museum's grounds, and they received the final $250,000 they needed in the General Assembly session that ended this month.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2013
Gladys C. Spare, a retired antiques dealer and artist who was a self-proclaimed Francophile, died June 22 at the Glen Meadows retirement community in Glen Arm of complications from a fall she had suffered two weeks earlier. She was 94. The daughter of a carpenter and a dressmaker, Gladys Catherine Woods was born and raised in Trenton, N.J. After graduating in 1936 from Hamilton High School, she attended an art school in New Jersey, and later at the Maryland Institute College of Art . She also studied with R. McGill Mackall, the Maryland muralist and Dickeyville resident, who died in 1982.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | October 20, 1995
The history of 20th century art can seem much too complicated and difficult to follow, with its confusing succession of isms: Cubism, futurism, surrealism, expressionism, etc. What's this all about, anyway?Well, there's no better way to understand art than to look at it, and the Baltimore Museum of Art is now offering an excellent opportunity to follow visually the art of the century's first half. Two new shows containing prints, drawings and photographs take us from the dawn of cubism to the threshold of abstract expressionism; those who want to cross the threshold need only visit the museum's modern wing to see how abstract expressionism developed from what went before it."
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2012
Tom Stoner made his fortune owning AM radio stations, where the weekly Top 40 was eagerly anticipated by devoted listeners. Would their favorite artists move up this week? Would that new release make it? "I remember how easy it was to decide who came on the list," recalls the Annapolis businessman and philanthropist, "but how hard it was to decide who went off the list. That was the part of the process that fascinated me. " At the Severn River home of Stoner and his wife, Kitty, "Top 40" takes on a new meaning.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | May 28, 2000
The Spanish surrealist painter Salvador Dali (1904-1989) is one of the great paradoxes of 20th century art. Like many artists in the first decades of the century, Dali was fascinated by Sigmund Freud's concept of the unconscious and by the role that dreams and the irrational play in human experience. Yet unlike many of his great contemporaries, Dali rejected abstraction as a pictorial style, choosing instead the precise realism of the Italian and Dutch Old Masters to create unnerving visions of a confused psychic landscape that he himself once described as a kind of "voluntary hallucination."
NEWS
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | February 18, 1996
You can argue endlessly over abstract art -- over why it came about, whether it was a good or a bad development in the history of art, whether it's soulless or reflects man's highest aspirations and ideals, whether it's a dead end, whether it's dead. What you can't do is deny its status as the most central and potent movement in 20th century art.Similarly, you can argue with a lot of things about "Abstraction in the Twentieth Century," the museum-filling show that just opened at the Guggenheim in New York.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2012
Tom Stoner made his fortune owning AM radio stations, where the weekly Top 40 was eagerly anticipated by devoted listeners. Would their favorite artists move up this week? Would that new release make it? "I remember how easy it was to decide who came on the list," recalls the Annapolis businessman and philanthropist, "but how hard it was to decide who went off the list. That was the part of the process that fascinated me. " At the Severn River home of Stoner and his wife, Kitty, "Top 40" takes on a new meaning.
NEWS
February 8, 1993
Name: Chris MassieSchool: Thunder Hill Elementary SchoolHome: ColumbiaAge: 10His accomplishments: The fifth-grader has won a scholarship to study art at the Maryland Institute of Art. His scholarship, worth $180 for 10 weeks of lessons, will enable him to learn more about 19th century and 20th century art and artists.Chris turned in a portfolio containing 10 pieces of his work, including still-life drawings, batiks and animation, to be considered for the scholarship."He's a very talented kid," said his art teacher, Janet Baird.
NEWS
September 14, 2012
The letter writer who objects to the Sun Magazine noting that Vic Carter has collected more than 300 works by black artists, poses the rhetorical question of whether it would be noted if someone had a collection of works by white artists ("A double standard in reporting on race in the arts," Sept. 13). Apparently the writer has not had much contact with collectors, because as someone who works in an antiques business, I can tell you that the type of person who amasses a collection of 300 objects invariably has a specialty.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | February 8, 1991
Baltimore Museum of Art director Arnold Lehman said yesterday the museum is "increasingly committed" to building a wing for 20th century art at its Art Museum Drive site, but has not completely given up the idea of a downtown branch at the Power Plant instead.His comments came in the wake of an announcement earlier this week by David Gillece, acting head of Center City-Inner Harbor Development Inc., that he will not select a developer at this time from the proposals submitted in the fall, of which the museum's was one."
NEWS
September 14, 2012
The letter writer who objects to the Sun Magazine noting that Vic Carter has collected more than 300 works by black artists, poses the rhetorical question of whether it would be noted if someone had a collection of works by white artists ("A double standard in reporting on race in the arts," Sept. 13). Apparently the writer has not had much contact with collectors, because as someone who works in an antiques business, I can tell you that the type of person who amasses a collection of 300 objects invariably has a specialty.
NEWS
April 20, 2001
FOR TWO YEARS the most popular part of the Baltimore Museum of Art, the Cone Collection of early modern art, has been closed, its gems on tour. With other parts of the BMA closed for renovation and much of the Walters Art Museum closed for the same purpose at the same time, museum-hopping, museum membership and museum reverie have been in sad decline in Baltimore. Fortunately, that's over. The Walters Art Gallery helped prepare for its comeback, still awaited, by renaming itself Walters Art Museum, which is deemed more informative.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | May 28, 2000
The Spanish surrealist painter Salvador Dali (1904-1989) is one of the great paradoxes of 20th century art. Like many artists in the first decades of the century, Dali was fascinated by Sigmund Freud's concept of the unconscious and by the role that dreams and the irrational play in human experience. Yet unlike many of his great contemporaries, Dali rejected abstraction as a pictorial style, choosing instead the precise realism of the Italian and Dutch Old Masters to create unnerving visions of a confused psychic landscape that he himself once described as a kind of "voluntary hallucination."
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | June 11, 1996
Now that the Lucas Collection has been saved for Baltimore, now that all the suspense is over, and before we go back to our daily rounds, let us recognize and be grateful for what has been done for us.Let us give thanks to the arts institutions involved, which put aside any animosities engendered along the way, as well as to the judge and all the other disinterested but profoundly concerned parties, for having come up with a solution so completely right....
NEWS
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | February 18, 1996
You can argue endlessly over abstract art -- over why it came about, whether it was a good or a bad development in the history of art, whether it's soulless or reflects man's highest aspirations and ideals, whether it's a dead end, whether it's dead. What you can't do is deny its status as the most central and potent movement in 20th century art.Similarly, you can argue with a lot of things about "Abstraction in the Twentieth Century," the museum-filling show that just opened at the Guggenheim in New York.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | October 20, 1995
The history of 20th century art can seem much too complicated and difficult to follow, with its confusing succession of isms: Cubism, futurism, surrealism, expressionism, etc. What's this all about, anyway?Well, there's no better way to understand art than to look at it, and the Baltimore Museum of Art is now offering an excellent opportunity to follow visually the art of the century's first half. Two new shows containing prints, drawings and photographs take us from the dawn of cubism to the threshold of abstract expressionism; those who want to cross the threshold need only visit the museum's modern wing to see how abstract expressionism developed from what went before it."
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | June 11, 1996
Now that the Lucas Collection has been saved for Baltimore, now that all the suspense is over, and before we go back to our daily rounds, let us recognize and be grateful for what has been done for us.Let us give thanks to the arts institutions involved, which put aside any animosities engendered along the way, as well as to the judge and all the other disinterested but profoundly concerned parties, for having come up with a solution so completely right....
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | December 30, 1990
The announcement earlier this month that the G. H. Dalsheimer Gallery would close in April was the latest event in a turbulent year for art locally and nationally. If the 1980s were a period of expansion and prosperity in the art world, the experiences of 1990 do not bode as well for the millennium's final decade.To be sure, there was expansion and there were plans for expansion. The opening of the C. Grimaldis Gallery Sculpture Space, and exhibits of work there by internationally known artists Jene Highstein and Ulrich Ruckriem, were highlights of the year.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | February 19, 1995
Tom Miller's art makes everybody happy. You can see it on people's faces when they encounter the work."I love to see the pleasure of people," says his dealer, Steven Scott, "when they walk in and gravitate to one of his pieces with a huge smile on their face.""His work resonates with an energy and a vitality that is infectious," says Leslie King-Hammond, an old friend of Miller's and dean of graduate programs at the Maryland Institute, College of Art. "It has a universal appeal to all kinds of people."
NEWS
February 8, 1993
Name: Chris MassieSchool: Thunder Hill Elementary SchoolHome: ColumbiaAge: 10His accomplishments: The fifth-grader has won a scholarship to study art at the Maryland Institute of Art. His scholarship, worth $180 for 10 weeks of lessons, will enable him to learn more about 19th century and 20th century art and artists.Chris turned in a portfolio containing 10 pieces of his work, including still-life drawings, batiks and animation, to be considered for the scholarship."He's a very talented kid," said his art teacher, Janet Baird.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.