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NEWS
By H.D.S. Greenway | April 6, 1999
IF THERE is a symbol of this sorry century, it is the refugee -- shuffling along some dusty road, jungle trail, or mountain pass, with a haunted-eyed family and a few pathetic belongings, trying to reach safety but knowing that even if safety is reached, nothing will ever be the same again.Refugees are the byproduct of wars, social disruption, and disorder, and every century has had them. But this century has been awash with refugees from beginning to end.In the Balkans, where the century is ending with the forced exodus from Kosovo, the early years saw similar scenes in the wars of 1912 and 1913 -- similar tragedies with strikingly similar atrocities as various ethnic groups and nationalities sought to free themselves from the dying grip of the Ottoman Empire.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2013
Like Gertude Berg, creator of "The Goldbergs," Moms Mabley is one of those remarkable women artists of the first half of the 20th century who never achieved the mainstream status and success her talent deserved. If you don't know who she is, I urge you to check out "Whoopi Goldberg Presents Moms Mabley" tonight at 9 on HBO. You can get a taste of it from my podcast preview for Baltimore's WYPR (88.1 FM). Born in 1897, Mabley's career spans vaudeville to television, though like many black performers, she was kept off TV until the civil rights movement opened some doors on Network Row near the end of her career.
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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | December 31, 1999
CHICAGO -- Michael Jordan was the overwhelming choice of business and advertising executives asked to name the top sports endorser of the 20th century.Jordan received four times as many votes as golfer Tiger Woods, the runner-up, in a poll asking executives to name the sports celebrity from the 1900s that they'd want most to pitch their products. Chicago-based Burns Sports Inc., which hires sports figures as endorsers, conducted the survey.Golfer Arnold Palmer finished third.Even though Jordan retired before last season, the five-time National Basketball Association most valuable player is earning $69 million annually from endorsements with companies such as Nike Inc. and McDonald's Corp.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | November 16, 2013
Three famous men died on Nov. 22, 1963. The one getting the most attention, understandably, is John F. Kennedy. Less so the other two: Aldous Huxley, author of the futuristic novel "Brave New World," and Clive Staples Lewis. Of the three, it was Mr. Lewis who not only was the most influential of his time, but whose reach extends to these times and likely beyond. His many books continue to sell and the number of people whose lives have been changed by his writing expands each year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joseph R.L. Sterne and Joseph R.L. Sterne,Special to the Sun | May 2, 1999
Flacks, spinmeisters, press agents, publicity men, propagandists, social psychologists, political consultants, media mavens, opinion researchers, lobbyists, public relations counsels -- can anyone doubt that the 20th century is the PR century? No group has done more to influence how we live, shop, eat, dress, travel, indulge, invest, vote, think and envisage who we are, individually and collectively, than the tens of thousands of men and women who have chosen this line of work. Or its allied field of advertising.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | October 17, 1999
The poet John Keats wrote that beauty and truth are two aspects of the same thing, that to know one is to know the other. But if the art of our time is to be truthful, how can it be beautiful too, given the terrible events this century has witnessed?The century started out by declaring war on beauty, or at least the notion that beauty was necessary for a definition of art. As the painter Barnett Newman declared in 1948, "the impulse of modern art is the desire to destroy beauty."The misadventures of beauty in the 20th century -- its early exile by the avant garde and its shy reappearance as the millennium approaches -- serve as backdrop for an endlessly intriguing show at the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington titled, aptly enough, "Regarding Beauty."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 1, 1999
Hearing the words of actor Ossie Davis alone would be enough to justify seeing "I'll Make Me a World: a Century of African-American Arts," starting tonight on PBS."Art was at one time the only voice we had to declare our humanity," says Davis, one of the first voices heard in this six-hour documentary series on the history of black artists in 20th century America."When we were described as barely above cattle, certainly not human, it was our art that we had to show the rest of the world that possibly we were humans.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | August 26, 2001
For Sir Richard Eyre, his six-part television series Changing Stages is an exercise in the art of the impossible. "Theater insists on being live, in the present tense," he says in the opening episode. "It can't be recorded. You can't show it on television." Or, as he puts it in the handsome coffee table book he co-wrote with playwright Nicholas Wright to accompany the PBS series, "Making television programs about the theater is as quaint a folly as putting ventriloquists on the radio."
TOPIC
By Diane Scharper | June 20, 1999
AS WE APPROACH the next millennium, there are more than 63,000 Americans who saw the dawn of the 20th century. Centenarians -- people 100 years old or older -- have witnessed the advent of electric lighting, the refrigerator and the indoor toilet. They have lived through two world wars, the Great Depression, the rise and fall of Communism, and the emergence of the United States as a world power.When they were born, most Americans lived on farms, and they rode in horse-drawn carriages. When they went to school, they considered themselves privileged.
FEATURES
By Melody Holmes and Melody Holmes,SUN STAFF | July 1, 1999
To take the "Photo of the Century," there's no need for a fancy camera. The only equipment necessary is 100 people with good timing.These people -- each born on a different Fourth of July of the 20th century and representing all 50 states and the District of Columbia -- are the winners of the "Photo of the Century" contest sponsored by Kodak.The winners -- including two youngsters from Maryland, Chelsea Leigh Marsh and Casey Marsh -- were chosen from more than 25,000 entries from all over the United States, plus one entry each from Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2013
Gladys C. Spare, a retired antiques dealer and artist who was a self-proclaimed Francophile, died June 22 at the Glen Meadows retirement community in Glen Arm of complications from a fall she had suffered two weeks earlier. She was 94. The daughter of a carpenter and a dressmaker, Gladys Catherine Woods was born and raised in Trenton, N.J. After graduating in 1936 from Hamilton High School, she attended an art school in New Jersey, and later at the Maryland Institute College of Art . She also studied with R. McGill Mackall, the Maryland muralist and Dickeyville resident, who died in 1982.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2013
You cannot understand American humor in the second half of the 20th Century without appreciating the crazed genius of Mel Brooks. And "American Masters" does an all-out appreciation at 9 p.m. Monday (May 20) on PBS. Here's a podcast of my preview from WYPR (88.1).   #sigshell { float: left; width: 320px; height: 52px; margin: 20px 0px; display: block; } #sigheadshot{ float: left; margin: 0px 10px 0px 0px; } #sigtwitter { margin-right: 5px; } #sigtooltip { padding: 5px; border-radius: 5px; -moz-border-radius: 5px; -webkit-border-radius: 5px; }
EXPLORE
By Kevin Leonard | March 24, 2013
From 1909 until 1939, marathons were run from Laurel to Washington or Baltimore. After the first few marathons, they not only became AAU-sanctioned, but the race was one of the qualifying marathons for the U.S. Olympic team. There was one constant in all those years: The starting line was in front of the Laurel Hotel on the corner of Main Street and Washington Pike (Route 1southbound). When the modern Olympic Games were started in 1896, the marathon was included. The following year, the Boston Marathon was inaugurated.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2013
Baltimore helped the avant-garde painter Max Weber forge a national reputation in 1915. Now, nearly 100 years later, this could be the city where the late artist begins his long-overdue comeback. It's not that critics and curators are unfamiliar with the Russian-born, Brooklyn-raised painter's work. As a new exhibit at the Baltimore Museum of Art makes clear, Weber has long been considered one of the most significant American artists of the 20th century. But, at the peak of his career, Weber was a bona fide celebrity, with spreads in "Time," "Life," "Look" and 'The Saturday Evening Post.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2012
Tom Stoner made his fortune owning AM radio stations, where the weekly Top 40 was eagerly anticipated by devoted listeners. Would their favorite artists move up this week? Would that new release make it? "I remember how easy it was to decide who came on the list," recalls the Annapolis businessman and philanthropist, "but how hard it was to decide who went off the list. That was the part of the process that fascinated me. " At the Severn River home of Stoner and his wife, Kitty, "Top 40" takes on a new meaning.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | September 6, 2012
A few years ago, it was fashionable for Democratsto describe themselves as "members of the reality-based community. " These days, it seems the foreclosure crisis has hit them so hard they've been forced to move to another neighborhood. Metaphorically, at least, they've set up a refugee camp in Charlotte this week. In this political Brigadoon, things are going well in America, so well in fact that President Barack Obama obviously deserves a second term because Americans are better off than they were four years ago, and that the Republican Party is little more than a haven for old-fashioned robber barons who think like Klansmen but dress like Mr. Monopoly.
NEWS
By RONA MARECH and RONA MARECH,SUN REPORTER | March 22, 2006
Perhaps it was the goose grease, a homemade remedy for colds. Or maybe the teaspoons of castor oil and camphorated oil. Or the squirrel, muskrat and pig's head Elizabeth Stewart liked to fix and enjoy with a nice cold beer. Stewart certainly did something right: She outlived two husbands, two sons and, not least of all, the entire 20th century. The year she was born, Britain's Queen Victoria died, the first transatlantic radio message was transmitted and a bread toaster cost a grand total of 20 cents.
NEWS
By Michael E. Waller and Michael E. Waller,Publisher and CEO | December 5, 1999
This special issue of The Sun paints a portrait of the people, events and achievements that shaped our lives and the world in the 20th century. It is not a full accounting of the historical events of the last 100 years but a visual essay -- a cavalcade of history.It is also a testament to the impact of photojournalism in this century. Born in the 19th century, the photograph became the main instrument of documentation in the 20th century. Its storytelling power was limited only by the keen eye of photojournalists and their ability to gain access to the events of our time.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2011
There's a lot going on in Waverly, in case you haven't noticed. Late last month, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake signed a bill designating the old Waverly Town Hall at Greenmount Avenue and 31st Street as the city's latest historic landmark. The building's second-floor hall had once been a popular meeting place for 19th- and 20th-century politicians, as well as a neighborhood gathering place for Waverly residents. "A lot of us who live in the Waverly area are excited that this has happened," said Joe Stewart, a Waverly activist who is an attorney with the state Department of Assessments and Taxation.
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