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NEWS
By JULIAN E. BARNES AND BORZOU DARAGAHI and JULIAN E. BARNES AND BORZOU DARAGAHI,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 9, 2006
RAMADI, Iraq -- Three U.S. soldiers scouring the treacherous roads of western Iraq for remote-controlled explosive devices were killed by a massive roadside bomb that destroyed their heavily protected vehicle, U.S. military officials said yesterday. In Baghad, U.S. and Iraqi forces launched the third operation in two days targeting leaders of Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr's Mahdi Army militia. And at least 10 Iraqi civilians were reported killed in political violence around the country.
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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 18, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - The Army has filed murder charges against a 1st Armored Division soldier accused of killing the driver of a vehicle after a high-speed chase in south-central Iraq last month, the U.S. military announced yesterday. The incident was thought to be the first in which a U.S. soldier was charged with murder in Iraq. The soldier, a commissioned officer whose name and rank were not released, faces an Article 32 investigation, similar to a grand jury proceeding in civilian court.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 26, 2006
WASHINGTON -- In the latest sign of stress from growing violence in Iraq, the Pentagon said yesterday that it has extended the combat tour of 4,000 Army soldiers, the second time in as many months that an Army brigade has seen its year-long deployment lengthened. The 1st Brigade of the 1st Armored Division, which is assigned to Ramadi, the capital of volatile Anbar province, will remain in Iraq an additional 46 days, defense officials said. Originally scheduled to leave Iraq in January, the brigade will now return to its home base in Germany in late February.
NEWS
By John Hendren and John Hendren,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 27, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Attacks against the American occupying force in Iraq escalated yesterday as two soldiers were killed and four were wounded in two separate ambushes on military convoys in one of the most violent days since the end of the war. Attackers fired rocket-propelled grenades, heavy machine guns and small arms at an eight-vehicle supply convoy in what military officials described as an ambush at 6:15 a.m. near Hadithah, 120 miles northwest of...
NEWS
By John Hendren and John Hendren,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 2, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - The U.S.-led occupation plans to shift control of this war-stricken city center to Iraqi forces soon and move most American troops to the capital's perimeter, military officials said yesterday. "Unless you give them a chance to practice their skills to go out there and face things on their own, then you never know what they can do," said Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz, who was visiting Baghdad for the third time since the war began. "But clearly it's better for us if they are on the front lines, and it's better for them, and it's better for their country."
NEWS
May 26, 1991
Army Pvt. Philip Schubert, at 18, already has seen his first war, but that hasn't stopped him from being just a kid."One of the firstthings I did when I got home was go outside and roll in the grass with my brothers and climb a tree," he said.Schubert also turned the tables on his mother, whom he called from Saudi Arabia at 3 a.m. to wish a Happy Mother's Day before flying home that same day to Fort Riley, Kan."He called and said he was coming home the 20th and not to tell anybody," said Debbie Elkins, hismother, of Finksburg.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 16, 2003
WASHINGTON - Personal papers found with Saddam Hussein during his capture at a farmstead southeast of Tikrit have led to the arrests of two and possibly more senior officials of the toppled regime and provided information about cells of insurgents operating in Baghdad, military officers in Iraq and Pentagon officials said. The documents have convinced some U.S. military officers that the former Iraqi leader at least had some detailed information on the anti-American insurgency and might have been aiding its efforts.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 15, 2004
WASHINGTON - Sometime next year, the Army is expected to begin bringing home the 1st Armored Division, a 20,000-soldier unit based in Germany that is laden with Abrams tanks, armored vehicles and self-propelled 155 mm howitzers - all designed to repel a Soviet threat that no longer exists. In its place, the Army will probably position troops in smaller bases, perhaps in Eastern European countries, with highly mobile Stryker light-armored vehicles. The plan is part of a broad troop shift that reflects a rethinking of military strategy.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 16, 2003
FALLUJAH, Iraq - U.S. troops pressed forward yesterday in a new campaign combining military raids against suspected loyalists to Saddam Hussein with high-visibility relief projects for Iraqi civilians. Commanders said they hoped the two-sided approach would help eradicate armed resistance against U.S. forces. Hours after soldiers carried out raids in Baghdad yesterday, military engineers set out to build soccer fields for children in the same neighborhood. But in a sign of continued resistance, several U.S. soldiers were wounded yesterday when their convoy was attacked about 50 miles north of Baghdad, near the city of Balad.
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