Advertisement
HomeCollections18th Century
IN THE NEWS

18th Century

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2011
A daylong Colonial Camp gave fifth-graders at Joppa View Elementary School insights into 18th-century life in America and surprising news about whether they would have been eligible to fight in the revolutionary army. At 10 years old, they would have met the age requirement for enlistment. But before they could be armed with a musket, children also had to master 12 camp calls on fife and drum that were the army's battle commands. And they would have to have demonstrated a strong bite.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
What remarkable lives they led. The five men, who hailed mostly from the pinnacle of French aristocracy, were liberals who threw off their own privileges to build a more equitable society. Individually, they danced with Marie Antoinette, fled the guillotine, spied for their country and played a role in a slave revolt in Haiti. All five relocated to Philadelphia, and in just a handful of years managed to exert a lasting impact on the fledgling United States of America. Francois Furstenberg, an associate professor of history at the Johns Hopkins University, follows the exiles on their American adventures in his new book, "When the United States Spoke French.
Advertisement
FEATURES
September 8, 1991
Market Square in Alexandria, Va., will be filled with hawkers and peddlers, merchants, musicians and members of the militia as Gadsby's Tavern Museum re-creates an 18th century fair from noon to 5 p.m. Saturday.You can participate in an auction, learn the latest dance steps, attend a court session, watch a militia muster, hear campaign speeches, watch a theater production, buy crafts and enjoy 18th century fare. Children can play old-fashioned games and see an 18th century puppet show.The fair is free, but a donation is suggested.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2014
Today they endure climbing children and have bicycles chained to them, but the cannons that flank Patterson Park's Pagoda were used in wars as much as 350 years ago, park officials have found. A cannon expert surveyed the seven historic weapons last fall and will soon undertake their restoration after finding they aren't just reproductions, as many had thought in the century since they were installed to commemorate the War of 1812 centennial. Some were likely used in the Battle of Baltimore, on land or sea, and in the Revolutionary War - or earlier.
FEATURES
By Dorothy Fleetwood and Dorothy Fleetwood,Contributing Writer | May 8, 1994
Travel back in time to Annapolis of 200 years ago during the 18th-Century Trades Fair on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Charles Carroll House, 107 Duke of Gloucester St.Charles Carroll, portrayed by Baltimore actor David Guy, will be on hand to greet you. Carroll was a signer of the Declaration of Independence and one of the wealthiest men in the American Colonies. You will meet his wigmaker and servants and a large group of Colonial tradesmen, portrayed by the South River Sutlers, who will set up shop in the Carroll garden.
NEWS
By Newport News Daily Press | October 6, 1994
WILLIAMSBURG, Va. -- The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation will re-enact an 18th century slave auction for the first time Monday -- a vivid step back into racism the foundation's black history interpreters decided to take themselves."
FEATURES
By Dorothy Fleetwood and Dorothy Fleetwood,Staff Writer | June 28, 1992
Ash Lawn-Highland, home of President James Monroe in Charlottesville, Va., is the setting for opera, a Broadway musical, concerts, and other events during the 15th annual Summer Festival of the Arts in progress through Aug. 16.Visitors will be transported back in time to see the plantation as it was in Monroe's lifetime when "Plantation Days" is held there Saturday and next Sunday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Costumed craftspeople and artisans will be engaged in...
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff writer | February 20, 1991
Using the right tools, black families in Carroll often can trace their roots back as far as the 18th century.The Historical Society of Carroll County will conduct a Black History Forum, aimed at showing residents helpful resources to use in tracing family heritage."
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 29, 1998
The HM Bark Endeavour, a replica of an 18th-century ship that sailed around the world, is to arrive in Baltimore firing its cannons and under full sail at noon today for a nine-day stay at Constellation Pier in the Inner Harbor.Endeavour will be open to visitors from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. tomorrow through June 7. The ship is stopping in Baltimore as part of a 16-port, seven-month tour of North American cities.Endeavour was commissioned in 1994 and was built using the specifications of the HM Bark Endeavour that Capt.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | April 23, 1992
Like a number of other artists these days, Pablo Cano recycles found objects -- junk, more or less -- into artwork. But what Cano also recycles, as his exhibit at Nye Gomez Gallery shows, is the 18th century, and therein lies some of the wit that makes this show a pleasure.Cano is both a visual and a performance artist. He and writer Giulio V. Blanc have collaborated on a performance work that combines music, Blanc's words and Cano's marionettes (manipulated by Cano and others). In it, four 18th century characters comment on love and other matters: Casanova, Madame de Pompadour, Voltaire and Fragonard.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2014
Jean H. Hepner, an early Fells Point community activist who restored one of its residential landmarks and fought a planned interstate highway, died of injuries she suffered as a passenger in an automobile accident Feb. 1 on the Baltimore Beltway at Park Heights Avenue. She was 90. Family members said Jean Rose Harvey was the first child born in Wisconsin in 1924. She was born in Milwaukee at eight minutes after midnight on Jan. 1. She was the daughter of James D. Harvey, a radio store owner who wrote a broadcasting column for the Milwaukee Journal, and Rhea Carson Blake, an occupational therapist.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2013
Falling within the ZIP code for the town of Kingsville in northern Baltimore County is the pre-Revolution mill village of Jerusalem on the banks of Little Gunpowder Falls. It is relatively unknown except to its few lucky residents, a handful of visitors and local historians. Jana Von Bramer and her husband, Colin Dinnery, a park assistant at Gunpowder Falls State Park, are the owners of a historic fieldstone and river stone house at the edge of a narrow lane, just past a covered wooden bridge that purportedly is haunted.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2013
Attorneys challenging a death sentence before the state's highest court last week dug deeply into online historical documents to divine the intention behind what they think is a never-before-interpreted part of the state's constitution. Public defender Brian Saccenti and a team of lawyers rested their argument in part on a once-famous 18th-century book by a young Italian nobleman named Cesare Beccaria, who suggested that capital punishment should be reserved for treasonous criminals.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2012
Burleigh Cottage, an historic Howard County house whose origins go back to the late 1700s, sold in October for $1.1 million. The house at 10250 Burleigh Cottage Lane in Ellicott City started out as a log cabin used as a hunting retreat. Additions were made to the cabin over the years, and the house is now 3,579 square feet. "The log cabin part of the house is still the original. It's got the original floors, the original fireplaces," said Concetta Corriere with Remax 100, who represented the seller.
EXPLORE
April 10, 2012
Visit the Hays House Museum in Bel Air Sunday at 1 p.m. and explore the health issues and illnesses that plagued 18th century women and children. Visitors will see a display of historic medical equipment and find out about herbal medicines, midwifery practices and Quaker contributions to medicine, surgery and dentistry. Your guide to the fascinating art and mystery of medical practices and theories of the time is Nancy Webster, a Past Masters history interpreter who has studied 18th century domestic life and Quaker material culture for more than 40 years.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2011
A daylong Colonial Camp gave fifth-graders at Joppa View Elementary School insights into 18th-century life in America and surprising news about whether they would have been eligible to fight in the revolutionary army. At 10 years old, they would have met the age requirement for enlistment. But before they could be armed with a musket, children also had to master 12 camp calls on fife and drum that were the army's battle commands. And they would have to have demonstrated a strong bite.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2008
Susan Wooden can work miracles with history. She can get people excited about doing ordinary tasks such as laundry, washing dishes, or hearth cooking. "I go back to a time when there was no electricity and no freezers," Wooden said. "And then I show people how things were done. I enjoy seeing the excitement in the eyes of the audience. I know I have connected with them." Wooden joins a group of historians and living history interpreters as a board member of Jerusalem Mill. She is also a docent volunteer at Hays House, a member of the Maryland Loyalists Battalion, and a volunteer docent at a Colonial Williamsburg event.
NEWS
By Tawanda W. Johnson and Tawanda W. Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 2, 2004
With sun-dappled trees and excited parents in the background, more than 50 third-graders clad in Colonial garb locked arms and danced to 18th-century music on the grounds of Glenelg Country School. The girls donned white blouses, petticoats with aprons and "mop hats" while the boys wore white shirts, breeches and three-cornered hats. Teachers and parents joined the fun with similar clothing. "One, two, three, four," said music teacher Eline Reis, clapping to the beat and giving dance instructions as the schoolchildren sashayed and skipped with their partners between giggles.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2011
Howard County government is moving to buy Belmont, the historic 18th-century Elkridge estate left vacant in December when owner Howard Community College removed its culinary training classes and canceled future rentals. The Ulman administration announced Friday that the county is exercising its right of first refusal to make the purchase, though plans for the property are uncertain. There has been discussion of having a local environmental group operate programs there and manage the property.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2011
Phyllis L. Mowbray, former director of the Carroll County Public Library's "Library Link" program, who restored an 18th-century farmhouse with her husband, died Monday of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at Carroll Hospice Dove House. She was 88. Phyllis Louise Wagner was born in Baltimore and raised in Pikesville. She was a 1939 graduate of Franklin High School. Two years later, she became ill with tuberculosis, which forced her to be confined for a year at the state sanatorium at Sabillasville in Frederick County.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.