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By Dorothy Fleetwood | November 23, 1995
As most of us enjoy a sumptuous feast at our own Thanksgiving tables, interpreters at Jamestown Settlement near Williamsburg, Va., re-create a 17th-century feast."
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
Alexander M. "Marty" Todd Jr., a retired Eastern Shore vegetable farmer who was an 11th-generation member of the family that settled a farm that is now Todd's Inheritance Historic Site in North Point, died Sunday of respiratory failure at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 92. "He'd call me when I was in the Baltimore County Office of Planning and would regale me with stories. He was one of the last private owners of the Todd Mansion on North Point Road," said John W. McGrain Jr., a Towson writer and former secretary of the Baltimore County Landmarks Preservation Commission.
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FEATURES
November 17, 1991
"Foods and Feasts in 17th Century Virginia" will be featured Thanksgiving Day through Nov. 30 at Jamestown Settlement, where life in America's first permanent settlement is demonstrated.On Friday a whole hog will be processed at James Fort, and vegetables, bread, meats and desserts will be prepared in traditional 17th century style. Aboard the Susan Constant you can learn about a 17th century seaman's diet. Stews and game birds will be roasted over an open fire at the Powhatan Indian village.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2013
Picture it: England, 1707. Two guys who have run out of money decide to seek out and successfully woo rich women. They take turns playing master and servant as they roam the countryside in their quest, which leads them to the town of Lichfield and some very promising prospects. That set-up leads to all sorts of crazy things in George Farquhar's "The Beaux' Stratagem," one of the classics of Restoration Comedy, the genre that flourished for several decades after Charles II assumed the British throne in 1660.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | October 20, 1992
ST. MARY'S CITY -- Scientists excavating what may be the burial place of Maryland's founding Calvert family said yesterday that the contents of at least two of the crypt's three lead coffins appear to be extremely well-preserved after more than 300 years.The first gamma ray images of the two coffins' contents show apparently well-preserved skulls, with shadows that some scientists suggest may reveal soft tissue, cloth burial shrouds or even hair.The images also clearly reveal the fine wood grain of the interior coffins, an indicator that the lead sheathing has kept the coffins relatively dry and sound.
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Contributing Writer Los Angeles Times Syndicate | October 24, 1993
As regular readers of this column know, I am fascinated by the history of the decorative arts. It is through this kind of study that we gain insights into past civilizations and also pick up some practical pointers for designing our own interior environments.One thing we learn is that interior design did not originate either in the United States or during the 20th century. I find that many people assume that this particular decorative art must be a fairly recent American invention, since our homes are filled with American-made furnishings and gadgets.
FEATURES
By Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel and Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | June 9, 1996
The back of my pine chair is round, and when the back is flipped forward, the chair turns into a table. When was it made?Table chairs were introduced in the 17th century. They also were made in the 18th and 19th centuries for use in country houses. They sell for $1,200 to $7,500.My grandparents were from Turkey. When they died, they left me an old doll with a wooden face. It's a man dressed in a native Turkish costume. I think he's made from papier-mache. He is marked "Ertugrul O Zsoy Turk El Isleri Ataturk Bulwari."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | December 22, 1998
ABERDEEN -- In the 1680s, the frontiersman and tobacco merchants of the northern Chesapeake Bay gathered to trade and socialize at a tiny tobacco port on the Bush River. They called it Baltimore Town, the 17th-century seat of Baltimore County's court.Archaeologists digging gingerly amid unexploded munitions at the Army's Aberdeen Proving Ground say they have found traces of that first Baltimore, a town that vanished decades before the 1729 founding of a new Baltimore, 20 miles to the south on the Patapsco River.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2001
OLD PLANTATION CREEK, Va. -- It must have been a sight -- three stories of brick and mortar towering above the marshes and flat, sandy fields here where the Chesapeake Bay meets the Atlantic. In the mid-1670s, a time when even the well-to-do were scratching to make a stake in the Virginia Colony, wealthy planter and tobacco merchant John Custis II outdid his fellow gentry, building a home historians say was the "most magnificent in the Chesapeake" on an isolated spot near the southern tip of Virginia's Eastern Shore.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | November 12, 1992
ST. MARY'S CITY -- She was lame and nearly toothless. And she was lovingly buried more than 300 years ago, her wrists tied together with ribbons and her body sprinkled with herbs.These were among the first findings yesterday as scientists opened the second of three lead coffins believed to contain members of Maryland's founding Calvert family.The first coffin, opened Monday, held the skeleton of a child, perhaps 6 months old, who evidently suffered from severe nutritional deficiencies that left its skull perforated and its ribs deformed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2012
The view of a 16th-century Lisbon street is such a teeming hodgepodge of races, social classes and religions and has so much life on display - much of it mischievous - that's it hard not to smile. Slightly to the right of center, an African man wearing the wide pants of a sailor dances with a stranger. He's trying to embrace a middle-aged white woman carrying a jug, who recoils in surprise. Toward the left, two Jewish policemen - identifiable by their long beards and armbands - support a sheepish-looking black prisoner who appears to be drunk.
NEWS
November 18, 2011
America is a product of the Age of Reason. Our founders used their rational powers to free us from the ignorance and superstition that shackled less enlightened societies. For over two centuries, we have assumed that the Age of Reason was here to stay, a permanent flowering of our intellectual growth. Alas, the anti-planning hysteria in parts of Maryland reveals that the Age of Reason may have been just a phase, one that is ending as we regress to the magical thinking of centuries past.
NEWS
By John McIntyre, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2011
Each week, The Sun's John McIntyre presents a moderately obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar — another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: GRAVAMEN Terms from law sometimes sidle into the general language. One such is gravamen (pronounced gruh-VAY-men), meaning the most serious part of a complaint or accusation. It derives from the Latin gravis , "heavy," and came into English in the 17th century as an ecclesiastical term for formal presentation of a grievance.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | May 11, 2009
On the day before the 2009 Maryland House and Garden Pilgrimage opened, co-chair Hilles Whedbee hosted a luncheon for 70 volunteers at her northern Baltimore County home. She has attended most of the tours this month and on Sunday she will open Shawan House, a Georgian brick colonial that overlooks Western Run Valley, to about 400 visitors. She works full time as a nurse midwife, is planning graduation parties for both of her daughters and is going about sprucing up her home and its spacious grounds without anxiety.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | March 8, 2009
ST. MARY'S CITY -Henry Miller's assignment might have been hopeless. As research director for Historic St. Mary's City, he was expected to guide the reconstruction of the first Roman Catholic house of worship in English America, for which no drawings or even written descriptions have ever been found. All that was left of the 1667 Brick Chapel in Maryland's first Colonial capital were its huge, 3-foot-thick brick foundation and thousands of fragments of glass, lead, brick and plaster sifted from the soil during 20 years of painstaking archaeology.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | March 22, 2008
I was laid up, at home, in forced recuperation and climbing the walls. My mother's close friend, Elizabeth Heinekamp Mitchell, called to say she was doing volunteer duty by chauffeuring aged Sister Mary Clement downtown to do monthly banking for her fellow sisters at the cloistered monastery where she was a member - and arguably its No. 1 character. Elizabeth requested that my mother accompany her. My mother said that there'd be another passenger: her eldest son, then 14.
NEWS
July 9, 2006
1851: Howard becomes Howard After being passed back and forth between Anne Arundel and Baltimore counties since the 17th century, the lands now known as Howard County officially became an independent jurisdiction on July 4, 1851. [Source: Maryland State Archives]
NEWS
By Dan Berger | July 13, 1998
The rich are moving back into Baltimore City. The poor are still getting out.Congress has abolished the Internal Revenue Service and will replace it with an agency having identical functions bearing the same name.The Northern Irish are mired in the 17th century, which looks ridiculous to us, who are well into the 19th.Roy Rogers is finally Home on the Range.Pub Date: 7/13/98
NEWS
July 9, 2006
1851: Howard becomes Howard After being passed back and forth between Anne Arundel and Baltimore counties since the 17th century, the lands now known as Howard County officially became an independent jurisdiction on July 4, 1851. [Source: Maryland State Archives]
NEWS
By CASSANDRA A. FORTIN and CASSANDRA A. FORTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 14, 2006
When the Rev. John Miles Evans arrived at All Hallows Parish in June 1999, he was surprised to find it was the only one of 30 Episcopal parishes that existed in Maryland in 1692 without a historical marker. "It would have been easy to get one because the other churches all had one, so I wonder if the omission was deliberate," said Evans, 66, who became a priest in 1995. "The church was run for the longest time by a few old families. I think it's a well-kept secret for having such a big place in history."
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