Advertisement
HomeCollections101st Airborne Division
IN THE NEWS

101st Airborne Division

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
NEWS
November 5, 2004
James Gorman Keeney, a former Sweetheart Cup Co. worker and World War II paratrooper, died from complications of heart disease and diabetes Sunday at his Finksburg home. He was 81. Mr. Keeney was born and raised on a farm in Savage. He attended Howard County public schools until leaving to help support himself. In 1943, he enlisted in the Army, and after completing paratrooper training, he joined the 17th Airborne Division. He later served with the 101st Airborne Division, better known as the Screaming Eagles.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2003
Sgt. 1st Class Brad Bonnell isn't worried about his two brothers in Iraq. His brother Bryon is a major and, because he's an aide to the commanding general of the 3rd Infantry Division, stays a safe distance from the action. His oldest brother, Brett, is also a major; he flies helicopters, but Brad doesn't think he has done so in this war theater. It's their mother Brad worries about most. "She's never been in a conflict with all three sons," he said one afternoon last week, while sitting on the back of a Humvee in Baghdad.
NEWS
By LOUISE ROUG and LOUISE ROUG,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 10, 2005
BAGHDAD, IRAQ -- A leading Sunni cleric in Baghdad called for the release of four Western hostages yesterday, a day before the deadline imposed by their kidnappers. With his appeal during his sermon at the Abu Hanifa mosque in the predominantly Sunni Arab neighborhood of Adhamiya, Moayad Adami joined a growing chorus calling for the release of the humanitarian workers, an American, a British citizen and two Canadians, who were abducted Nov. 26. He encouraged his congregation "to inform whoever has any influence, or to lend a helping hand [for]
BUSINESS
March 25, 1996
New positionsChristopher J. Kurtzman is McCormick vice presidentMcCormick & Co. announced that Christopher J. Kurtzman has been selected as vice president and treasurer. A certified public accountant, the Ellicott City resident and graduate of the University of Notre Dame joined the Hunt Valley-based spice and flavorings company in 1976.John P. Shobert joins Maryland Consulting GroupMaryland Consulting Group announced that John P. Shobert, a human resources executive, joined the firm as a senior associate.
NEWS
August 6, 1998
Joseph F. Hughes, 53, credit union vice presidentJoseph F. Hughes, vice president of operations at the State Employees Credit Union, died Saturday at Johns Hopkins Hospital of an aneurysm. The Baltimore resident was 53.Mr. Hughes graduated from Mergenthaler Vocational-Technical High School in 1962 and went to work at Schaeffer and Strohminger, an automobile dealer, in the mechanics and parts departments.He joined the Army in 1966, served in Vietnam from 1966 to 1968 and was discharged in 1970.
NEWS
October 13, 1994
John T. JohnsonRetired steel workerJohn T. Johnson, a retired steel worker, died Saturday of cancer at his home in Irvington. He was 64.He retired as a coke oven operator in 1992 after 39 years at Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s Sparrows Point plant.The native of Roxboro, N.C., came to Baltimore in 1953.Services were set for 7 p.m. today at New Shiloh Baptist Church, Clifton Avenue and Monroe Street, Baltimore.He is survived by his wife, the former Arie Williams; two sons, James L. and Gary L. Johnson, both of Baltimore; eight daughters, Esther B. Grate of Fort Eustis, Va., and Ellen E. Burton, Wanda L. Johnson, Lillian D. Spriggs, Robin A. Moore, Letitia Y. Johnson, Jill R. Johnson and Jackie Hector, all of Baltimore; four brothers, Isaac, McKinley, Andrew and Joe Johnson, all of Roxboro; five sisters, Elizabeth Eddie of Philadelphia and Lucy Jane Springfield, Cadelia Green, Emily Thornton and Minnie Neal, all of Roxboro; 22 grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 20, 2003
CAMP PENNSYLVANIA, Kuwait - Word of the airstrikes on Iraq came as a surprise to some officers with the Army's 101st Airborne Division this morning. Here at Camp Pennsylvania, 30 miles from Iraq, commanders got the news from a reporter as they awoke at 6:30 a.m: The U.S. military struck Baghdad with Tomahawk cruise missiles and precision bombs from F-117 fighter-bombers in the opening salvo of military action to oust Saddam Hussein. But at Camp Pennsylvania, the humdrum rhythms of the camp made it seem like any other day. A line of soldiers out for a run resembled a centipede in the hazy distance.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2003
A former Calvert County man whose lifelong ambition was to become a helicopter pilot was one of four men killed when a U.S. military helicopter crashed in Afghanistan on Thursday. Chief Warrant Officer Thomas J. Gibbons, 31, who grew up in Prince Frederick, was part of an elite Army aviation team - the 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment - based at Fort Campbell, Ky. The helicopter was on a training mission. Chief Warrant Officer Mark S. O'Steen, 43, of Alabama; Sgt. Gregory M. Frampton, 37, of California; and Staff Sgt. Daniel L. Kisling Jr., 31, of Missouri were also killed in the crash.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2013
James J. Cadden, a retired Baltimore police homicide detective and highly decorated World War II veteran, died Monday of a swallowing disorder at his Cockeysville home. He was 88. The son of a construction owner and a homemaker, James Joseph Cadden was born and raised in the former 10th Ward in Baltimore. He attended the old St. John the Evangelist Roman Catholic Church parochial school on Valley Street and then attended city public schools. He left school in the ninth grade and later earned his General Education Development diploma.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,Sun reporter | August 5, 2008
When Sgt. Ryan P. Baumann told his family five years ago that he wanted to join the Army, relatives say they knew it was coming. Sergeant Baumann spent eight years of his childhood in Germany, where he picked up a foreign language and learned the ins and outs of Army life. "Ryan grew up around the miliary," said his mother, Cindy Lohman, who worked as a civilian nurse on a base in Germany. "It didn't surprise me. His heroes were guys in the 82nd [Airborne Division]. And he was a post 9-11 child, so he felt very committed to doing something to protect this country."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.