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By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 6, 2003
NEAR NAJAF, Iraq - The temperature reached 112 degrees in Baghdad yesterday and the high 90s elsewhere in Iraq, leading U.S. soldiers to strip off their protective biochemical suits to seek relief from the withering heat. Supply tanks filled with water wended their way to the troops, who have been ordered to drink 2 gallons a day to stave off heat exhaustion. Not everyone was so lucky; two soldiers with the 101st Airborne Division collapsed from dehydration, the first stage of heat-related illness.
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NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 20, 2003
CAMP PENNSYLVANIA, Kuwait - Word of the airstrikes on Iraq came as a surprise to some officers with the Army's 101st Airborne Division this morning. Here at Camp Pennsylvania, 30 miles from Iraq, commanders got the news from a reporter as they awoke at 6:30 a.m: The U.S. military struck Baghdad with Tomahawk cruise missiles and precision bombs from F-117 fighter-bombers in the opening salvo of military action to oust Saddam Hussein. But at Camp Pennsylvania, the humdrum rhythms of the camp made it seem like any other day. A line of soldiers out for a run resembled a centipede in the hazy distance.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2003
A former Calvert County man whose lifelong ambition was to become a helicopter pilot was one of four men killed when a U.S. military helicopter crashed in Afghanistan on Thursday. Chief Warrant Officer Thomas J. Gibbons, 31, who grew up in Prince Frederick, was part of an elite Army aviation team - the 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment - based at Fort Campbell, Ky. The helicopter was on a training mission. Chief Warrant Officer Mark S. O'Steen, 43, of Alabama; Sgt. Gregory M. Frampton, 37, of California; and Staff Sgt. Daniel L. Kisling Jr., 31, of Missouri were also killed in the crash.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2013
James J. Cadden, a retired Baltimore police homicide detective and highly decorated World War II veteran, died Monday of a swallowing disorder at his Cockeysville home. He was 88. The son of a construction owner and a homemaker, James Joseph Cadden was born and raised in the former 10th Ward in Baltimore. He attended the old St. John the Evangelist Roman Catholic Church parochial school on Valley Street and then attended city public schools. He left school in the ninth grade and later earned his General Education Development diploma.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | February 26, 1991
DHAHRAN, Saudi Arabia -- The first hours of ground combat suggested that U.S. military planners calculated correctly when they made preparations to house and feed hundreds of thousands of Iraqi prisoners of war.U.S. military planners spent months planning for the potential surrender of hundreds of thousands of prisoners. But allied commanders had warned before combat began that a torrent of POWs could force the allies to walk captured Iraqis south to Saudi Arabia under armed guard.That would stretch the resources of the military police, so National Guard details are standing by to assist, said Maj. Rex Forney, MP deputy provost marshal for the 101st Airborne Division.
NEWS
November 5, 2004
James Gorman Keeney, a former Sweetheart Cup Co. worker and World War II paratrooper, died from complications of heart disease and diabetes Sunday at his Finksburg home. He was 81. Mr. Keeney was born and raised on a farm in Savage. He attended Howard County public schools until leaving to help support himself. In 1943, he enlisted in the Army, and after completing paratrooper training, he joined the 17th Airborne Division. He later served with the 101st Airborne Division, better known as the Screaming Eagles.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2012
A Special Forces soldier from Baltimore County was killed Saturday in Afghanistan, officials said. Army Staff Sgt. Brandon Robert Pepper, a 1999 graduate of Kenwood High School in Essex, was on patrol in Ghazni province in Eastern Afghanistan when his unit was attacked by insurgents, according to Army Special Forces Command. He was 31. In a statement, his family called him "A good brother, a caring brother, a loving brother. " "Brandon was a good friend to all of us, and was always willing to help.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 9, 1997
IRVINE, Calif. -- A number of medical professionals, who say they have become ill while treating Persian Gulf war veterans, claim the mysterious disease afflicting tens of thousands of soldiers is contagious and could pose a public health threat.Doctors, nurses and laboratory researchers, as well as others who come in casual contact with gulf war veterans, say they have contracted the same symptoms -- fatigue, fever, aches, rashes and respiratory problems -- that are generally associated with "gulf war syndrome."
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,Sun reporter | June 30, 2008
William L. Brooks, a retired contractor with the Raytheon Service Co. at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, died of lung cancer June 21 at the Veterans Administration Rehabilitation and Extended Care Center in Baltimore. The Annapolis resident was 64. In his position at Raytheon, Mr. Brooks managed the vehicle fleet and ensured that supplies got to NASA stations around the world, according to his wife, Sara Jensen Brooks. He traveled extensively to Guam, Hawaii, Bermuda and elsewhere, she said.
BUSINESS
March 25, 1996
New positionsChristopher J. Kurtzman is McCormick vice presidentMcCormick & Co. announced that Christopher J. Kurtzman has been selected as vice president and treasurer. A certified public accountant, the Ellicott City resident and graduate of the University of Notre Dame joined the Hunt Valley-based spice and flavorings company in 1976.John P. Shobert joins Maryland Consulting GroupMaryland Consulting Group announced that John P. Shobert, a human resources executive, joined the firm as a senior associate.
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