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Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2012
Lee Richardson is a pioneer of sorts in taking a new look at a very old energy source. The Wicomico County poultry farmer just finished installing a commercial-sized wood pellet stove to heat one of his chicken houses in Willards, east of Salisbury. When his next flock of chicks arrives from Perdue, Richardson will test how the wood-warmed birds fare compared with those raised in a neighboring house, which is heated by burning propane gas. "We're going to run it for a year and see what happens," Richardson said.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,jeff.barker@baltsun.com | June 25, 2009
Catonsville retiree Jim Daly considered it galling to have to shell out a combined $2,800 for six "personal seat licenses" for the right to buy Ravens season tickets before the team moved to its new stadium in 1998. "I thought it was a total rip-off," said the devout fan, whose truck is painted Ravens purple. But Daly shifted his position after he sold the seat licenses recently, turning his investment into $13,000 - a 464 percent profit. Daly joined many other fans who are making money on their initial football investments.
NEWS
By Cox News Service | November 18, 1999
Six bodies unearthed last year in the Norwegian Arctic have unexpectedly yielded a scientific prize: They hold part of the virus that caused the Spanish influenza of 1918, which killed at least 40 million people in one of the worst disease outbreaks in history.Researchers at a scientific meeting in London said this week that they have identified fragments of the long-sought virus in the brains and organs of six young men who died in October 1918 on Svalbard, an island less than 800 miles from the North Pole.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | June 30, 1995
THE ROLAND PARK Second Presbyterian Church looked absolutely stunning last Saturday for the wedding of Natalia Pia Melanie Sommer and Richard Matthew Dohler. Thousands of wildflowers, miles of lace ribbons and tulle, and window sills decorated with Singapore orchids set the stage for the nuptials of the daughter of pop music star Donna Summer and her first husband, Helmut Sommer,and the son of Dick and Bonna Dohler, he's an Ellicott City builder.The church was filled with the music of German trumpeteer Langston Fitzgerald and selections of Bach, Beethoven and Vivaldi, played by the church's music director Margaret Budd on the organ.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff Writer | October 21, 1993
A former Baltimore County man who has spent two decades behind bars for his role in a crime spree that culminated in one of the most notorious mass slayings in U.S. history is poised for his release from a Maryland prison.As a Cub Hill teen-ager in 1973, William C. "Billy" Isaacs joined his fugitive brother and half-brother on a two-week road trip that included stops to murder a high school senior near Cumberland and six members of a Georgia farm family. Yesterday, he moved a step closer to freedom when Baltimore Circuit Judge Elsbeth L. Bothe directed state officials to draw up conditions for his parole.
BUSINESS
By Dean Uhler | September 29, 2002
Why does the water heater in my new house have another small tank hanging off the side of the pipe above it? That is an expansion tank installed on the water supply pipe to the water heater. Its purpose is to deal with thermal expansion of water as it heats up in the water heater - to prevent water pressure from getting too high. If water pressure gets high enough it can damage valves in plumbing fixtures, joints in supply pipes and even the water heater. Thermal expansion always occurs in water heaters.
NEWS
By S. M. KHALID | October 27, 1991
Last week, a reputed 18-year-old drug kingpin, Anthony Jones, was arrested in East Baltimore. Police said a multi-million-dollar organization was organized when Mr. Jones was a juvenile and used children as young as 11 years old as street dealers.Over the last 20 years, according to prosecutors and police, local drug dealers have grown progressively younger and more dangerous, as the appetite of city drug addicts continues to switch increasingly from heroin to cocaine.During the reign of the "old school" traffickers -- mature adults -- heroin was Baltimore's drug of choice.
NEWS
By Kathleen Purvis and Kathleen Purvis,McClatchy-Tribune | February 27, 2008
My oven has convection-roast and convection-bake settings. I understand convection is a heat-circulating fan, but the roast vs. baking part confuses me. What difference does it make to the oven if I leave the lid off a meat pan? In food language, roast and bake really aren't different. Both are done in an open pan, usually in an oven. We refer to cooking meats and vegetables in an open pan as roasting, while cakes, cookies and pies are baked. But convection, which uses fans to circulate air, is a different beast.
NEWS
By Newsday | June 30, 1993
The story was that planes were kept circling as President Bill Clinton had his hair clipped on Air Force One at Los Angeles International Airport last month.The runway haircut by Beverly Hills stylist Cristophe became such a metaphor for perceived White House arrogance that the president felt compelled to apologize for the reported delays.But the reports were wrong.According to Federal Aviation Administration records obtained through the Freedom of Information Act, the May 18 haircut caused no significant delays of regularly scheduled passenger flights -- no circling planes, no traffic jams on the runways.
SPORTS
By Mike Littwin and Mike Littwin,SUN STAFF | March 2, 1997
CAMDEN, N.J. -- The news hit hard, even in this city where gunfire is hardly news at all: There was Mike Rozier, famous ex-football player and native son, standing on a drug corner last November at 3 a.m., big holes blown through his chest by a .357 Magnum, his life -- just like in the movies -- passing before his eyes.No one knows exactly what happened on that drug corner last November, only that, if choreographed, there'd be no "Chariots of Fire" music. There was an altercation. Somebody had a gun. Was it a drug deal gone bad or just a guy so messed up on booze and drugs that he opened fire on his friends?
NEWS
By Matt Patterson | June 21, 2011
(Clarification: Although the ONE foundation's $15 million in funding in 2008 is listed in tax documents as “contributions,” the organization does not solicit funding from the general public but from foundations and board members, according to ONE’s website and a statement from a spokeswoman.) Tonight, U2 bring their enormously successful 360 Tour to Baltimore, and if previous U2 shows are any guide (trust me, I've seen them 11 times), the show will feature not only the soaring anthems for which they are rightly known but also a healthy dose of promotion for the band's many charitable causes.
SPORTS
By Daniel Gallen and The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2013
Second baseman Brian Roberts' wife, Diana, gave birth to the couple's first child Friday, a son named Jax Isaac, who weighed six pounds, seven ounces. “Everything seems to be going well,” Showalter said. “He was up for most of the night.” Roberts was still on paternity leave for Saturday night's game against the Seattle Mariners, with Alexi Casilla - who is starting his first game since July 8 - taking his place in the field. Showalter said Roberts could return for Sunday's season finale, but he wasn't sure yet. The current plan is for Roberts to return to the Orioles on Monday and fly with the team to San Diego.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
As I watched Tuesday while the anchors on “Fox & Friends” leveled unsubstantiated charges against Rep. Elijah Cummings as if they were facts, I couldn't help thinking how much more dangerous Sen. Joe McCarthy might have been in the 1950s if there had been a show like this to amplify his reckless allegations. The Fox News morning show was playing one of cable talk's dirtier games, and the longtime Democratic congressman from Baltimore was its target for his role in the House IRS probe.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,jill.rosen@baltsun.com | June 28, 2009
We would have remembered him if it was just the songwriting or just the dancing or just the eyebrow-raising fashion. But Michael Jackson dominated each of those artistic avenues - and so many others. You see his influence in every Justin Timberlake who sweats to perfect a signature move. Every movie-esque flourish in a video. Every African-American artist who sits atop the pop charts. His legacy is as enduring as it is multi-faceted. 1. Sound When America first met Jackson, he was a lovable, pint-sized pre-teen with a puffy Afro and an electric voice.
NEWS
By Jenn Topper and S. Derek Turner | November 6, 2013
So far this year, 223 local TV stations have changed hands. This is the biggest wave of media consolidation ever - and it's all happening in small and mid-level markets, involving companies most people have never heard of. Leading this wave is Hunt Valley-based Sinclair Broadcast Group. Sinclair alone is behind seven deals this year, including a $985-million deal to buy nine stations from Allbritton Communications. But it's not alone; other media companies are also racing to gobble up stations.
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