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Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

SPORTS
By BILL TANTON | November 29, 1994
The Washington Bullets' practice at Bowie State yesterday was nearly over when coach Jim Lynam blew the whistle, interrupting the scrimmage.Lynam knelt on one knee and looked up at his No. 1 draft choice, Juwan Howard."
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Young Chang and Peter Hermann and Young Chang,SUN STAFF | February 12, 1999
The body of a young woman found Tuesday buried in a shallow grave in Baltimore's Leakin Park was identified yesterday as an 18-year-old Woodlawn Senior High School student who disappeared nearly four weeks ago. Hae Min Lee was last seen Jan. 13 driving away from the Baltimore County school in a gray 1998 Nissan Sentra, on her way to get her 6-year-old niece and go to work at a LensCrafters store. "We thought she would come back," said her uncle Tae Soo Kim. Baltimore police said a man out walking found the grave, which was about 100 feet off Franklintown Road in the secluded West Baltimore park -- about a mile from Woodlawn High.
SPORTS
By Kevin B. Blackistone and Kevin B. Blackistone,Dallas Morning News | February 24, 1991
When CBS Inc. started an unprecedented spending spree for sports programs 2 1/2 years ago, it was a broadcasters' market. More fans were tuning in. More advertisers were paying the highest prices for commercial time. And the economy was rolling along.So, CBS had no qualms about paying $243 million for the 1992 Winter Olympics, $300 million for the 1994 Winter Olympics, $1 billion for the college basketball tournament and another $1 billion for major league baseball. The competition followed.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 23, 1997
For her efforts as the charismatic head of the Cambridge Non-Violent Action Committee during the battle for civil rights in the early 1960s, Gloria Richardson Dandridge was called "Glorious Gloria." Others said she was like a second Harriet Tubman.The strong-willed housewife, who fearlessly pushed aside the bayonets of the National Guardsmen sent to maintain law and order, rose to national prominence as a civil rights leader who led marches and was arrested as she sought to promote civil rights for Eastern Shore blacks.
NEWS
By Cox News Service | May 23, 1991
WEST MILTON, Ohio -- A 63-year-old man bludgeoned his wife to death yesterday morning with a pair of banjos, deputies said."I've been an officer for 30 years, and that's the first banjo killing I've seen," said Miami County Chief Deputy Charles Price. "It's just kind of bizarre."Edward Benson has been charged with aggravated murder and was being held in the Miami County Jail in lieu of $50,000 cash bond. Mr. Price said Mr. Benson beat his wife, Katie, with the musical instruments in their home about 5 a.m."
NEWS
By Peter Honey and Peter Honey,Washington Bureau | January 17, 1993
Three days from the presidency, Bill Clinton confronts a worl already more perilous than the one that brought him victory less than 11 weeks ago. Old enemies are up to new tricks in the Middle East; the passing of the Cold War has raised a flurry of regional conflicts around the world. Meanwhile the economy continues to confound with conflicting signs of recovery and slide, and the deficit continues to grow. Mr. Clinton faces myriad challenges. But here are 10 widely viewed as the toughest, what he said about them during the campaign and the outlook for solution:1.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2001
M. Cristina Gutierrez, one of the Baltimore area's most ferocious criminal defense lawyers, has agreed to her own disbarment, marking the end of an accomplished law career. The state Court of Appeals ordered her "disbarred by consent" May 24, after Gutierrez agreed to resign rather than fight complaints filed against her with the state Attorney Grievance Commission, which investigates allegations of wrongdoing by lawyers. Reached by telephone yesterday at her home in Towson, Gutierrez, 50, said she suffers from multiple sclerosis.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Contributing Writer | February 21, 1992
BERLIN -- Once at the center of the Cold War's last great propaganda battle, Jakob Segal now sits in his cramped high-rise, pondering why no one believes his theory that the AIDS epidemic was made in Maryland."
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2014
Two Towson University students edged out 170 other teams to win a national debate championship held in Indiana this week, the second time in recent years a Towson team has netted national debate honors. Ameena Ruffin and Korey Johnson, both from Baltimore, bested a team from the University of Oklahoma in the final round. Their argument likened police brutality, the prison-industrial complex and structural poverty issues to a warlike violence against African-Americans in the U.S. and identified solutions.
NEWS
By Linda K. Harris and Linda K. Harris,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 17, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - In the 1950s, when the bells of the historic First African Baptist Church rang 96 feet above this corner in South Philadelphia, the neighborhood was filled with prosperous African-Americans, and the church itself, 2,000 members strong, would crowd to overflowing on Sundays. Mabel R. Taylor, 96, is the oldest of the 100 or so faithful who remain. She remembers well the joy of watching the sun glint through the many stained-glass windows, and she recalls the glory of the chimes.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,Sun Staff Writer | July 8, 1995
Baltimore's Canadian Football League franchise, only 17 months old, entered a new era yesterday, when owner Jim Speros christened the team with a new nickname.Say hello to the Baltimore Stallions.Speaking at a news conference on Memorial Stadium's 55-yard line, which he reached by riding a horse across the field, Speros ended the short life of the Baltimore Football Club.After a banner reading "Home of the Stallions" was unveiled atop the upper deck behind the end zone, Speros said, "This is a name that makes a lot of sense to our football team and to our area.
SPORTS
By Dan Shaughnessy and Dan Shaughnessy,Boston Globe | February 16, 1993
Boston's winter of 1948 was bitterly cold. Slugger Ted Williams went south to fish. On Jan. 28, while Ted was fishing in Florida, Doris Williams gave birth to a daughter, Barbara Joyce Williams. The baby was early. Ted was late.The Globe's Harold Kaese wrote, "Everyone knows where Moses was when the lights went out. And apparently everybody knows where Ted Williams was when his baby was born Tuesday. He was fishing."In his biography, "My Turn at Bat," Williams wrote, "Well, Bobby Jo was the most important thing in my life from the moment she was born . . . but I sure wasn't going to apologize for something that didn't concern anybody but Doris and me."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mindy Sink and Mindy Sink,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 28, 2000
The inner workings of at least one piece of the criminal justice system can be viewed on the Internet 24 hours a day, courtesy of Web cams in the Maricopa County jail in south-central Arizona. Four cameras make up the Jail Cam (www.crime.com), which lets visitors view detainees being led into the jail in handcuffs, being fingerprinted and booked and being taken to holding cells. Sheriff Joe Arpaio of Maricopa County, which includes Phoenix, said he had installed the Web cams as a deterrent because he figured that viewing a holding cell on the Web would convince some people that they never wanted to wind up in one. Arpaio said he had also set up the Web cams as a response to critics who accused his officers of mistreating inmates.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 19, 1996
MIAMI -- Passengers' terrified shouts of "Fire! Fire! Fire!" echoed from the smoke-filled cabin as flames spread rapidly through a ValuJet airliner over the Florida Everglades in May, transcripts of cockpit recordings revealed yesterday."
SPORTS
By Aaron Oster | July 8, 2014
A week after a RAW filled with returns and new storylines, RAW from Montreal this week featured storyline development and in-ring action. The main angle for RAW revolved around the main event at Battleground, as John Cena, Roman Reigns, Randy Orton and Kane danced around each other all night. RAW started with Reigns coming down to the ring to cut a promo saying that he can be the one to stop Cena. He's definitely been getting more comfortable on the mic as time passes, as he was able to control the crowd, and play to them, in the promo.
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