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Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

SPORTS
By GARY DIAMOND | February 20, 1994
More than 33,000 whitetail deer were bagged by Maryland hunters during 1993's regular firearms season, the third highest total on record. In Harford County, hunters harvested 1,024 deer, most of which were taken during the season's first few days.Although a substantial number of hunters claim they enjoy the taste of venison, you'll often hear a different story from their spouses."Sure we eat venison at our house, but it's always tough and has a gamey taste," said a woman attending the Mid-Atlantic Hunting & Fishing Show at the Maryland State Fair Grounds.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon, and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon, and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | April 30, 2000
Q. I have a scalp condition for which I have used Nizoral for years. It also affects my facial skin and eyebrows, causing scaling and itching. I have used a prescription cortisone cream for this, but it is no longer very effective. After reading in your column about the person who used Vicks for bad dandruff, I tried it on my face and had almost immediate results. The scales in the nose creases disappeared overnight. The scaling on my forehead and in my eyebrows is also disappearing, but more slowly.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 24, 1999
One of the more complicated end-of-the-television-season rituals is saying goodbye to one-time hit series that have overstayed their welcome.In recent years, that list has included "Murphy Brown" and "Roseanne." Tonight, in that category comes "Mad About You" with Helen Hunt and Paul Reiser in a one-hour finale titled "The Final Frontier."The episode opens with Paul (Reiser) and Jamie (Hunt) Buchman in bed introducing a clip reel of some of their "favorite moments from the last seven years."
SPORTS
By Jerry Greene and Jerry Greene,Orlando Sentinel | October 20, 1991
Miami had just beaten New England on the road, 20-10, and Miami Dolphins tight end Greg Baty was relaxing in the afterglow of one his best days as a professional football player. For the moment, the fear didn't show in his eyes.He had caught four passes from Dan Marino for 89 yards. A good day's work. "I can't wait to go home and hug my wife," he said.That's when the haunted look returned to his face. He had thought of his wife, Kathleen, home and alone.Granted, she's in no more danger now than any other woman alone.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff Writer | April 28, 1993
A 53-year-old northeast Carroll county man was sentenced yesterday to eight years in state prison for sexually abusing three neighborhood children over four years.Carroll Circuit Judge Raymond E. Beck Sr. sentenced the defendant to 15 years for child abuse and eight years each for two counts of battery. The man's name is being withheld to protect the children's privacy.His victims were two boys and a girl, court records show.Judge Beck suspended all but eight years of the sentence and ordered the defendant to serve five years of supervised probation after his release from prison.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN STAFF | January 16, 1998
The old men of the Pea Island Coast Guard station told William Bowser that he could find a future serving his country, that one day, if he could wait, the color of his skin would no longer be a barrier to the golden stripes and brass medals that would adorn his smart blue uniform.But the young Coast Guard seafarer did not have the patience to wait it out on a lonely outpost in the center of North Carolina's Outer Banks. He had suffered so many slights, cut bait for too many officers, been barred from too many boating competitions, shined too many shoes.
SPORTS
By Jackie MacMullan and Jackie MacMullan,Boston Globe | March 31, 1991
It was never a matter of memorizing dead spots on the parquet or the way the lip of the south rim bent ever so slightly. The lighting? Nothing out of the ordinary, Andrew Toney reports. In fact, said the former Philadelphia 76ers guard, the only thing special about the creaky court on 150 Causeway Street was that it served as the stage for his most famous role: the Boston Strangler."My first step out of the locker room, I was in range," Toney says. "It was easy. I have no explanation for it. It was just easy for me to score at Boston Garden."
NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | March 1, 1999
The 17-year-old former boyfriend of Hae Min Lee was charged yesterday in the killing of the Woodlawn High School student, whose body was found Feb. 9 in a West Baltimore park, city police said.Sgt. Scott Rowe, a police spokesman, said Adnan Musud Syed was arrested about 6 a.m. at his home in the 7000 block of Johnnycake Road in Woodlawn, Baltimore County, and taken to the Central Booking and Intake Center, where he was charged as an adult with first-degree murder.Rowe said Syed and Lee, 18, were classmates and became friends in May. At some point in the relationship, Rowe said, they started dating.
NEWS
July 6, 2013
Arthur Hirsch 's recent article about the Battle of Gettysburg reveals a disturbing ignorance of the political dynamics that brought this nation to a war that 150 years later remains the most cataclysmic event in our history ("A defining day relived," July 2). It accepts the shallow but unchallenged premise that the Civil War occurred because slavery was practiced in the South, and that righteous resolve to abolish the institution left the U.S. with no option other than a resort to arms.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | June 7, 1991
Did he, or didn't he?Did the late David Ruffin sing on the Temptations single "Cloud Nine," as my appreciation last Sunday said? Or was it Dennis Edwards doing the singing, as the "Cloud Nine" album notes (and many Sun readers) claim?And why would there be any doubt over who sang what in the first place?To answer the last question first, let's go back to Saturday afternoon when I first heard that Ruffin had died of an apparent overdose. Given two hours to write my article, I turned to my reference library - in particular to Nelson George's "Where Did Our Love Go?"
FEATURES
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 17, 1995
Green Bay, Wis. -- It took two days to find Tom Monfils' body, sunk to the bottom of a giant paper mill pulp vat, a 45-pound weight around his neck. It took 2 1/2 years to charge six co-workers in his murder.When the arrests finally came last month, weary police detectives paused quietly for a beer. The Green Bay Press-Gazette put out a rare special edition. And in a tidy brick house on South Roosevelt Avenue, Joan and Edwin Monfils gave thanks that someone, at last, would have to answer for the death of their son."
NEWS
By Huntley J. Cross | November 25, 1990
There is a product that can be found in many Anne Arundel County liquor stores that I believe is dangerous and a threat to anyone who mistakes it for a wine cooler.This product is a fortified wine, which has a labeled alcohol content of 20 percent by volume (40 proof). Wine coolers have an alcohol content that ranges from 4 percent to 7 percent. Regular table wines average about 12 percent alcohol.Fortified wine, or "Cisco," comes in five flavors: red, peach, orange, berry and gold. It is bottled in two sizes: 375 and 750 milliliters.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | September 11, 1996
When Edgar Allan Poe died in this town in 1849, newspapers gave the cause of death as "congestion of the brain" and "cerebral inflammation," archaic terms that suggest doctors had no definitive explanation but believed Poe's death was related to a severe neurological disorder. ("We have no idea what killed him, but the poor guy sure had gone bananas.")Now Dr. R. Michael Benitez's fresh review of the case tends to support the idea that, in the last four days of his life, Poe's central nervous system was under attack by a vicious viral disease.
NEWS
By Lydia Martin and Lydia Martin,Knight-Ridder News Service | May 26, 1993
Say it ain't so.We've struggled for so long to resist that ugly little negative contraction, and now Merriam-Webster says "ain't" ain't so bad after all."Ain't" and 10,000 other new entries have made it into the newest edition of Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary. It's not the first dictionary to print the word, which has long appeared in unabridged dictionaries as well as Webster's New World Dictionary. But most identify it as substandard or slang. Merriam-Webster, the largest U.S. publisher of dictionaries, now includes it without any warning against its use.Other words and terms that got the nod are signs of the times: safe sex, date rape, boom box, politically correct, megahit, downscale, wire fraud, voice mail, significant other, veg out.You'd think Noah Webster, great granddaddy of American English, would be turning over in his grave.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | January 11, 1998
Before him lay Siamese twins, their brains joined by an elaborate network of blood vessels. The myriad folds and planes came into view.He saw where the brains divided. He studied the features from every conceivable angle. He memorized the terrain. He planned his moves.This was Dr. Benjamin Carson's rehearsal -- done in the eerie space of virtual reality.Today, the Johns Hopkins neurosurgeon is celebrating that two 11-month-old boys are recovering splendidly -- and separately -- in the South African hospital where he and more than 20 doctors and nurses performed an exhausting operation that lasted more than a day."
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