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Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2014
Ravens reserve wide receiver Deonte Thompson was arrested and charged with suspicion of possessing marijuana and drug paraphernalia Friday night, according to the Gainesville, Fla., police department. Police said an officer " noticed a strong odor of burned cannabis" coming from a Chevrolet SUV, which had been pulled over about 11:45 p.m. Friday night for driving without its headlights on. A search of the vehicle found bags totaling 29 grams of marijuana inside a duffel bag, but Thompson said only the bag was his. The driver, Alvon Summerall, and another passenger, Erskine J. McKinley , said the drugs were their own. Thompson played at Florida and was signed by the Ravens as an undrafted free agent in 2012.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | June 22, 1997
If Flint Gregory Hunt holds to his wish to be executed in the gas chamber next week, it will be one of the last uses in this country of what is seen as a dying method of capital punishment.It will be the final time in Maryland that a correctional officer pulls the lever that drops crystals of sodium cyanide into a bowl of sulfuric acid and water to create the deadly vapors -- an execution process that has taken place only four times before in the state's history."It's slowly going away," Richard C. Dieter, executive director of the Death Penalty Information Center in Washington, said of the gas chamber.
SPORTS
By Michael Vitez and Michael Vitez,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 1, 1991
PHILADELPHIA -- You can tell by the high-tops that this crowd is serious. As they stride onto the smooth, swept pavement, the trademarks flash like dog tags: Nike, Reebok, Adidas, Converse, Fila. As more and more players arrive, rap spills from a living-room speaker set next to an '80 Riviera parked courtside, announcing that the evening's action is about to commence. Sides are chosen, and soon the basketball is in play.The Moylan Recreation Center at 25th and Diamond is a proving ground, one of several playgrounds where Philadelphia's best players have always come to learn the game, to test themselves, to put their skills on display.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff Writer | December 11, 1994
About five times a month, Charles Robinson, a hemophiliac, uses a medical treatment manufactured from human blood to help clot his own blood.Two weeks ago, he received a letter from the distributor -- the American Red Cross -- informing him that some of the blood-clotting factor he uses might contain blood from a donor who later developed a rare, fatal brain disease called Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD).The product had been withdrawn from the market about three weeks before Mr. Robinson was notified.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2005
To lovers of Wild West folklore, he's Wyatt Earp - lawman, saloonkeeper, gambler, quick-triggered centerpiece of the legendary gunfight at the OK Corral. To Charles Earp Jr. of Catonsville and Pamela Earp Young of Ellicott City, he's cousin Wyatt. That the man who almost single-handedly defines the Wild West would have a couple of relatives in Maryland - and that those relatives would meet by coincidence - is perhaps not as far afield as it might seem. As it turns out, the Earp clan got its start in the United States when Thomas Earp Jr. of Ireland came to the Baltimore area in the 17th century as an indentured servant.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal and Mike Preston and Ken Rosenthal and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Writers Sun staff researcher Dee Lyons contributed to this article | September 11, 1994
More than a year later, Inez "Peggy" Ritch can't let go.Her Northeast Baltimore home is full of memories -- framed photographs, award certificates, handsome trophies. Mementoes of her son, Reggie Lewis, the basketball star.Reggie Lewis, who died on July 27, 1993, at the age of 27."It's been difficult," Ritch says. "I'm trying to adjust to this. People tell you, 'Give it to the Lord, pray.' I do. But evidently, I must not have done it. It's still with me."Every day, I close my eyes to sleep.
FEATURES
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Evening Sun Staff | November 13, 1990
WHAT DOES it mean when you hear that a dear friend has had a heart attack and is in the hospital in critical condition? Just how bad is critical? You might call the hospital the next day and be told his condition is stable. Does that mean he is out of danger now?Perhaps you read about an accident on I-95 in which three local teen-agers are hurt. The paper says one of the passengers was hospitalized in critical condition. The next day you read that the teen's condition is guarded. Does that mean he is getting better or worse?
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | April 17, 1998
Sharon Fenick first heard the figure of speech "rule of thumb" cited as a sexist pejorative during her freshman year at Harvard seven years ago.The phrase was invoked in a lecture as an example of domestic abuse permitted by British common law. The rule of thumb, according to the professor, was a law that allowed a man to beat his wife so long as the rod used was no thicker than his thumb. But over the centuries, the term had evolved into vernacular for an "approximate measure.""It sounded very believable to me," says the 24-year-old Fenick, now in her third year of law school at the University of Chicago.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 1, 2005
How long do the fatigue and "brain fog" last after general anesthesia for surgery? It depends - on your age, the specific drugs used, how long the surgery took and how healthy you were to start with. These days, most general anesthesia is short-acting, which means you wake up quickly and the drugs are mostly out of your system within a few hours, said Dr. Carl Rosow, an anesthesiologist at Massachusetts General Hospital. But tiny amounts can linger for up to seven days - enough so that you may not feel completely normal, especially if you also have a drink or two. Moreover, if you are one of the unlucky 20 percent to 40 percent of patients who have nausea and vomiting after general anesthesia, that can add considerably to your recovery time because of dehydration and weakness from not eating, said Dr. John Ulatowski, director and chair of the department of anesthesia and critical care at Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing Writer | January 12, 1994
Q: Jalapeno peppers seem to vary so much in their heat that I never know what result I will get with a recipe. Any suggestions?A: Fresh jalapeno peppers do have different heat levels, so I have come to rely on jarred pickled jalapenos for recipes, for both heat and convenience. No need to don gloves to cut and remove seeds. Just use the amount called for in the recipe (adding a little extra if you want it quite spicy). One medium jalapeno pepper equals one generous tablespoon of pickled, sliced jalapenos.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 19, 1993
WASHINGTON -- In a good-will gesture toward China, the Clinton administration has agreed to sell it a sophisticated $8 million supercomputer, senior administration officials said yesterday.The decision is part of the administration's strategy to embrace, rather than isolate, China despite disagreements over human rights, weapons proliferation and trade. The Clinton administration is determined to grab an ever-larger share of China's market, the fastest growing in the world, and reduce a trade deficit that could exceed that with Japan by the end of the decade.
NEWS
By Freeman A. Hrabowski III | December 22, 2013
A recent New York Times illustration read, "COLLEGE IS FOR SUCKERS. " The words were emblazoned across the sweatshirts of four students, and the accompanying article made essentially that point. It echoed an increasingly common refrain that college is expensive, that students are taking on unmanageable debt and that they too often graduate unprepared for the world of work. In contrast, many economists and educators point to data showing that the fastest growing job categories require at least a college degree.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF Staff writer Karen Hosler contributed to this article | November 16, 1995
WASHINGTON -- In remarks that reveal the personal tenor of the budget battle, House Speaker Newt Gingrich suggested yesterday that he and Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole toughened the spending bill that has led to the partial government shutdown because they felt President Clinton snubbed them on a recent plane ride.At a breakfast session with reporters, Mr. Gingrich said he was insulted and appalled that, on the long trip aboard Air Force One this month to and from the funeral of Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, the president failed to invite the Republican leaders to the front of the plane to discuss the budget, and then made them exit at the rear of the plane.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | January 4, 1996
They have been around for 70 years. So what can they show us that we haven't already seen?Plenty, says the coach of the Harlem Globetrotters."There have been some big changes, ever since the new management," coach Tex Harrison says. In 1993, Harlem Globetrotters International Inc. was bought by Mannie Jackson for $6 million when the former Globetrotter formed a partnership.He is the first African-American and former player to own the sports/entertainment organization, says Joyce Szymanski, a company spokeswoman.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | January 17, 1999
Kimberly Michelle Hricko had a scheme for killing her husband and getting away with it.The 33-year-old operating room technician from Laurel apparently honed the details for months:How she'd steal from her job at Holy Cross Hospital in Silver Spring a vial of muscle relaxant so powerful it can stop a person's breathing within seconds.How she'd inject the poison and paralyze her 6-foot-3-inch, 245-pound husband, Stephen Michael Hricko.How she'd set fire to the Eastern Shore resort room he had booked for a romantic Valentine's weekend last year.
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