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Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

BUSINESS
By Dean Uhler | March 31, 2002
Julie Somis of Baltimore has a historic, brick, end-of-group rowhouse next to Riverside Park in South Baltimore. The basement of the house is unfinished, with a thin concrete floor and a low ceiling. When she and her husband bought the house 11 years ago, their home inspector showed them deteriorated bricks and mortar at part of the foundation wall in the basement. The mortar is soft in places, the result of dampness in the wall leaching minerals from the mortar over the past century. Moisture has also broken down salmon bricks - bricks that are unusually soft because they were not well-fired when they were originally baked in the brick kiln.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Sun Staff Writer | February 8, 1995
On a spring day in 1878, a young Naval Academy physics instructor took his students from the confines of the lecture hall and assembled them along the banks of the Severn River. He began to set up an experiment for measuring the speed of light.But what Albert A. Michelson, then 26, achieved was nothing short of revolutionary. He set a measurement that would stand for 45 years and began work that would lead to Albert Einstein's theory of relativity.Michelson, who had graduated from the academy only five years earlier, set up a revolving mirror at one end of the sea wall and a stationary mirror 500 feet away, along with a heliostat, a lens and a tuning fork.
NEWS
By KELLY OVERTON | June 23, 2006
The pharmaceutical industry and the National Institutes of Health spend billions of dollars annually on medical research techniques that have been rendered obsolete by technological advances. Adult stem cell research is key to our status as the world's leader in medical research. The continued use of animals to test the effectiveness of medications and health interventions for humans is akin to using smoke signals instead of e-mail as a method of communication. Animal testing has never really worked.
FEATURES
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 3, 1999
BEIJING -- At first glance, it seemed like a terrific formula: a Chinese folk tale filled with adventure, Disney's masterful animation and tens of millions of Chinese children raised on Western movies.But instead of cashing in at the box office, Walt Disney's "Mulan" has bombed in her ancestral homeland."Mulan," which has grossed about $300 million worldwide, is the legendary story of a brave young Chinese woman who joins the army during the Sui Dynasty (589-618 A.D.) in place of her sick, elderly father.
NEWS
By Imre Karacs | August 1, 1999
GERMANS are at odds over claims that harsh potty training is to blame both for Nazism and modern thuggery.A friend of mine is convinced that the German national character in all its complexities can be traced back to Germans' rigorous potty training.Teutonic infants, he claims, are made to sit on their lowly thrones for hours on end, until pronounced spiffy clean, usually at a remarkably tender age.Out of this early purgatory of life emerges a nation of precision engineers obsessed with waste disposal, with an unquenchable yearning for order and authority.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 19, 1993
SHADY SHORES, Texas -- Wrestler Kerry Von Erich Adkisson, member of a star-crossed wrestling family that had already lost four of its sons, died yesterday of a bullet wound that was apparently self-inflicted.Mr. Adkisson, 33, a well-known wrestler dubbed "the Texas Tornado," was found dead about 2:50 p.m. by his father, Jack Adkisson, who also wrestled professionally for several years under the name Fritz Von Erich and raised a family of wrestling stars.He apparently used a gun he had given his father two Christmases ago.Kerry Adkisson was only the second of six sons still alive since a string of tragedies began in 1959.
NEWS
By Freeman A. Hrabowski III | December 22, 2013
A recent New York Times illustration read, "COLLEGE IS FOR SUCKERS. " The words were emblazoned across the sweatshirts of four students, and the accompanying article made essentially that point. It echoed an increasingly common refrain that college is expensive, that students are taking on unmanageable debt and that they too often graduate unprepared for the world of work. In contrast, many economists and educators point to data showing that the fastest growing job categories require at least a college degree.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 9, 1995
LOS ANGELES -- A man who lived near Nicole Brown Simpson told jurors yesterday how, shortly before midnight June 12, Mrs. Simpson's nervous, purposeful pet Akita dog pulled him toward its owner's condominium, stopped in front and peered into the yard.HTC When the neighbor looked for himself, he said, he saw Mrs. Simpson prostrate and "full of blood.""I turned to my wife and said there was a dead person there," the witness, Sukru Boztepe, told Marcia Clark, the chief prosecutor in the case.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2013
April 1 is the official start to the blue crab harvest in Maryland. But don't reach for your mallet just yet. "It's not time for crabs," said Jessica Borowski, a manager at Midtown BBQ and Brew. "It's too cold out. " The crabs seem to agree. The Chesapeake Bay's water temperature hasn't risen enough for the crabs to become active - and catchable. Consumers set on Maryland crabs will see limited availability for now - and prices to match. Prices for Chesapeake Bay crabs are typically high at the start of the season, and people who want them in April will have to pay even more than usual.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin D. Thompson and By Kevin D. Thompson,Cox News Service | March 3, 2005
You can't take your eyes off Shohreh Aghdashloo. It's not because she's strikingly beautiful. She is. Or because her voice is deeper than Barry White's. It seems like it. Or because she's a good actress. She was nominated for an Oscar for House of Sand and Fog. No, it's because the 52-year-old Iranian actress is playing a chillingly sinister Middle Eastern terrorist on 24. As the wickedly cunning Dina Araz, Aghdashloo is stealing every scene she's in with her icy looks, throaty voice and scary ability to poison her son's girlfriend with ease.
NEWS
By Douglas A. Beigel | April 22, 2014
A health care crisis is quietly unfolding in our nation's laboratories. This crisis has developed largely off the public's radar screen. If not resolved, it can adversely impact the lives of every American. The crisis in question: alarming shortages within the laboratory workforce. Lab testing has an estimated impact on over 70 percent of medical decisions. That percentage will grow as baby boomers retire and preventive coverage - including screening tests performed by labs - increases as part of federal health care reform.
NEWS
By Derrick Z. Jackson | April 17, 1995
ON HIS DEATHBED, he received 100 telephone calls per hour. More operators had to be hired to handle the load. "We've never had this number of calls, even when Lucille Ball was here, Kirk Douglas or George Burns," said Paula Correia, spokeswoman for Cedars Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. "Never anything like this, ever."One person who visited the dying man said: "It's a real shame. I went to the hospital and saw him, but he was unconscious. He didn't even know I was in the room. It wasn't a pretty sight, man. It was sad . . . I think it's terrible that this happened.
NEWS
By JOE PALAZZOLO and JOE PALAZZOLO,SUN REPORTER | February 27, 2006
To Jerry O. Pittman, the dilapidated 148-year-old mansion known as "The Mount" offers an opportunity for staff members of his nonprofit group home provider to come together under one roof in an isolated corner of West Baltimore. But Pittman's plans to restore the mansion - fixing its slumping roof and gutting its interior to create office space for about 30 employees - is running into fierce neighborhood opposition. Many residents of the Fairmount community charge that his idea, particularly his proposal to build a community center on an adjacent piece of property, will bring in unwarranted traffic, noise and other unwelcome hazards.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | May 22, 1995
"The CBS Evening News With Dan Rather and Connie Chung" was supposed to have a local flavor for Baltimore viewers tonight. Chung was scheduled to co-anchor the broadcast from WJZ -- CBS' Baltimore affiliate -- to give the station a ratings boost on the final week of May sweeps.Instead, Rather will be anchoring alone tonight, and it looks as if Chung is out of a job altogether.CBS News President Eric Ober announced Saturday that, as of today, Rather would be anchoring alone. Furthermore, Ober said, Chung's future at the network was uncertain.
NEWS
By Howard Goodman and Howard Goodman,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 21, 1998
PHILADELPHIA -- It was 1951 when the father of Retin-A first came to Holmesburg Prison.The 1,200 inmates of Philadelphia's gloomiest jail were plagued by an outbreak of athlete's foot, and the prison pharamacist had asked Dr. Albert M. Kligman, a University of Pennsylvania dermatologist, to take a look.Imagine the researcher's thrill as he stepped into the aging prison, hundreds of men milling around."All I saw before me were acres of skin," Kligman told a newspaper reporter in 1966. "It was like a farmer seeing a field for the first time."
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