Advertisement

Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

NEWS
By E.J. Fagan | November 25, 2013
U.S. law enforcement officials have been shutting down giant illegal marketplaces that do business in "bitcoin" and are beginning to lay out plans to regulate such digital currencies - like we do any other kind of money - by requiring that money laundering controls be applied to the transactions. The virtual bitcoin currency is not backed by any central bank or government and can be transferred "peer to peer" between any two people anywhere. It is created through a complex computer mining process that allows people to earn new bitcoins by solving certain mathematical problems.
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach and Alice Steinbach,SUN STAFF | June 25, 1996
In a minute, we'll get to the new book and the new movie deal but first, let's clear up the matter of where exactly Peter Mayle, the best-selling author of "A Year in Provence" and "Toujours Provence," currently resides.Is it true that the Pied Piper of Provence, the British expatriate whose last five blockbuster books have celebrated the glories of living in the south of France, is now residing in the east of Long Island? That he has abandoned -- after stirring up the desire in millions of us to pick up and move to Provence -- the charming, remote village of Menerbes for the ever-so-chic village of Amagansett in the Hamptons?
NEWS
By Cox News Service | May 23, 1991
WEST MILTON, Ohio -- A 63-year-old man bludgeoned his wife to death yesterday morning with a pair of banjos, deputies said."I've been an officer for 30 years, and that's the first banjo killing I've seen," said Miami County Chief Deputy Charles Price. "It's just kind of bizarre."Edward Benson has been charged with aggravated murder and was being held in the Miami County Jail in lieu of $50,000 cash bond. Mr. Price said Mr. Benson beat his wife, Katie, with the musical instruments in their home about 5 a.m."
BUSINESS
By DAN THANH DANG and DAN THANH DANG,dan.thanh.dang@baltsun.com | October 26, 2008
If the needle on a gas gauge points to "F" and no one is around to see it, does it mean the gas tank is full? This is not supposed to be a trick question, and the answer is: maybe. Or so Lauren Klemm discovered recently when she rented a U-Haul cargo van on Falls Road in Baltimore. After filling the van up with almost three gallons of gas for $10.09, Klemm and her dad dropped the van off at the U-Haul store after closing time and left the key in a drop box. Days later, the 25-year-old graduate student checked her bank account to discover that U-Haul charged her $32.25 on top of the $80 she'd already paid.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 11, 2005
SANTA MARIA, Calif. - Michael Jackson, dressed in purple paisley pajama bottoms and looking more spectral than ever, listened yesterday in obvious distress to more than four hours of damaging testimony from the boy who has accused Jackson of sexually molesting him. In a dramatic start to a tense day, Jackson arrived in court more than an hour late, disheveled, limping and heavily medicated after what his lawyers said was a fall early yesterday morning that...
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 25, 1996
I have a 6-year-old son in good health who has an interesting problem.For the last year or so, one of his outer ears sometimes becomes very hot to the touch and bright red. This can happen when he is resting, bouncing around or even eating. It doesn't seem to have any pattern, except that it is only one ear at a time. He doesn't have a cold or an ear infection when this happens.Someone said it is blood pressure, so I am concerned. I have asked doctors in the past who brush it off. Please let me know what you think.
NEWS
By Art Buchwald | December 28, 1992
I'VE just returned from Aspen even though I am not a skier. haven't skied in some of the greatest winter resorts in the world. I know that this is a terrible thing to admit. It's like saying, "I'm in sales but I don't play golf." But that's the way it is.I go to places like Aspen because I enjoy sitting in hotel lobbies in front of large fireplaces, drinking hot chocolate and talking about weather conditions on the various mountains that I haven't been on.I also like to go into town and try on ski clothes and buy Briko's snow goggles to wear over my wool cap.Occasionally I'll meet another person who doesn't ski, and then we'll throw snowballs at each other.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2004
Nearly 20 years after a little girl's beaten body was found in a wooded area of Rosedale, and 19 years after an innocent man was sentenced to death for that killing, the Dawn Hamilton murder case ended yesterday when her true killer pleaded guilty in a Baltimore County courtroom. Kimberly Shay Ruffner, a former East Baltimore man with a history of sexual attacks, acknowledged that he alone had sexually assaulted and murdered the 9-year-old girl in 1984. He was sentenced to life in prison; he is already serving time for an unrelated assault.
NEWS
By Rick Bragg and Rick Bragg,New York Times News Service | March 11, 1995
MONTGOMERY, Ala. -- The marchers came to the old man in the wheelchair, some to tell him he was forgiven, some to whisper that he could never be forgiven, not now, not a million years from now.Yet to all of the people who retraced the steps of the Selma-to-Montgomery civil rights march 30 years ago, George C. Wallace offered an apology for a doomed ideal.The former Alabama governor, whose name became shorthand for much of the worst of white Southern opposition to the civil rights movement, held hands with men and women he had once held down with the power of his office.
HEALTH
By Robin Rudner, Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2012
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth), which is reprinted here. This week, Robin Rudner weighs in on goal-setting. Jan. 1 has come and gone. If you made a resolution to improve your health and fitness (and you're serious this time), have you evaluated your progress? Do you have a plan? Consider SMART goal setting, an approach often used in corporate training.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | March 19, 1993
Some years back, Truman Capote, that master of self-dramatization, got himself a Time magazine cover by coming up with the term "non-fiction novel," which just happened to describe the book he was flogging. The phrase has lingered, even if poor Capote and his book have not, and it's a perfect description of "Brother's Keeper," which opens today at the Charles.This is an examination of a criminal case, real, hopelessly banal and yet unique, that throws a culture into relief, exposing its tics and flaws and surprising (or maybe not)
NEWS
By Alec Matthew Klein and Alec Matthew Klein,Sun Staff Writer | March 26, 1995
QUEENSTOWN -- Five years ago, Robert W. Kearns walked away from $30 million offered by Ford. Last week, he simply shrugged when he won $21 million from Chrysler.What Mr. Kearns wishes he had is the time he's lost.For 32 years, Mr. Kearns has relentlessly pursued automakers worldwide to get proper credit for inventing the intermittent windshield wiper. In the process, he saw his marriage collapse, suffered a nervous breakdown and consumed every waking moment steeped in lawsuits.Some -- even his daughter -- have questioned his sanity.
NEWS
By Steven Pinker | April 6, 1994
THE Los Angeles Times' new "Guidelines on Racial and Ethnic Identification," for its writers and editors, bans or restricts some 150 words and phrases such as "birth defect," "Chinese fire drill," "crazy," "dark continent," "stepchild," "WASP" and "to welsh."Defying such politically correct sensibilities, the Economist allows the use of variants of "he" for both males and females (as in "everyone should watch his language"), and "crippled" for disabled people.One side says that language insidiously shapes attitudes and that vigilance against subtle offense is necessary to eliminate prejudice.
SPORTS
By Kevin B. Blackistone and Kevin B. Blackistone,Dallas Morning News | February 24, 1991
When CBS Inc. started an unprecedented spending spree for sports programs 2 1/2 years ago, it was a broadcasters' market. More fans were tuning in. More advertisers were paying the highest prices for commercial time. And the economy was rolling along.So, CBS had no qualms about paying $243 million for the 1992 Winter Olympics, $300 million for the 1994 Winter Olympics, $1 billion for the college basketball tournament and another $1 billion for major league baseball. The competition followed.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | December 19, 1997
The Titanic, doomed star of the new movie "Titanic" opening today, was a disaster for newspapers as well as for the 1,517 passengers and crew who died 85 years ago. Not until the Chicago Tribune's "Dewey Defeats Truman" in 1948 were headline writers more embarrassed.The ship hit an iceberg at 11: 40 p.m. Sunday, April 14, 1912. It sank less than three hours later, at 2: 20 a.m. Monday April 15.For almost a day after that, much of the Western world heard the iceberg part but not the sinking and deadly results.
Advertisement
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.