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Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | June 30, 1995
THE ROLAND PARK Second Presbyterian Church looked absolutely stunning last Saturday for the wedding of Natalia Pia Melanie Sommer and Richard Matthew Dohler. Thousands of wildflowers, miles of lace ribbons and tulle, and window sills decorated with Singapore orchids set the stage for the nuptials of the daughter of pop music star Donna Summer and her first husband, Helmut Sommer,and the son of Dick and Bonna Dohler, he's an Ellicott City builder.The church was filled with the music of German trumpeteer Langston Fitzgerald and selections of Bach, Beethoven and Vivaldi, played by the church's music director Margaret Budd on the organ.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | April 17, 1998
Sharon Fenick first heard the figure of speech "rule of thumb" cited as a sexist pejorative during her freshman year at Harvard seven years ago.The phrase was invoked in a lecture as an example of domestic abuse permitted by British common law. The rule of thumb, according to the professor, was a law that allowed a man to beat his wife so long as the rod used was no thicker than his thumb. But over the centuries, the term had evolved into vernacular for an "approximate measure.""It sounded very believable to me," says the 24-year-old Fenick, now in her third year of law school at the University of Chicago.
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | September 21, 1996
Before gangsta raps there were raps about libraries and teen-age pregnancy; before Dannemora State Prison and the killing bullets, there were pillow fights and the exuberance of youth.Tupac Amaru Shakur did not grow up in Baltimore. He was not a finished product when he left. But his years here encompassed that crucial time when childhood ends and self-discovery begins.He was 14 when he and his mother moved here from the Bronx in 1985. He called himself MC New York and won a rap contest sponsored by the Enoch Pratt Free Library.
NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | May 28, 1995
FUKUOKA, JAPAN -- "I could never again wear a white smock," says Dr. Toshio Tono, dressed in a white running jacket at his hospital and recalling events of 50 years ago. "It's because the prisoners thought that we were doctors, since they could see the white smocks, that they didn't struggle. They never dreamed they would be dissected."The prisoners were eight American airmen, knocked out of the sky over southern Japan during the waning months of World War II, and then torn apart organ by organ while they were still alive.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | January 6, 1995
Would you trust Connie Chung?Under what circumstances?Let's say you were on a sinking ship and there was only one life jacket left and you were wearing it.And Connie comes up to you and says: "Gimme the jacket and I'll swim to the nearest lifeboat and then I'll row back for you."Would you give her the life jacket?You would?In that case, I hope you are very good at treading water. For several months.Because what happens if Connie swims for help and happens to meet O. J. Simpson's manicurist on the way?
FEATURES
By Diane Werts and Diane Werts,Newsday Los Angeles Times Syndicate | December 6, 1993
Ricki Lake has had easier evenings.The 25-year-old actress is standing under hot lights in the Manhattan studio of her "Ricki Lake" syndicated daytime show -- the one that Mediaweek proclaims is "breaking out of the freshman talk-show pack" and she's standing her ground against a guest considerably more formidable than the twentysomethings who fill the stage for topics like "My Best Friend Betrayed Me," or "Your Turn-Ons Turn Me Off."The uncharacteristically hard-edged subject is "Crusades Against Gays."
NEWS
By RAY JENKINS | December 16, 1994
Five years ago today Judge Robert S. Vance of the federal court of appeals for the 11th circuit opened a package that had just arrived in the mail at his suburban home in Birmingham, Alabama; the box contained a powerful bomb which killed Judge Vance instantly and gravely injured his wife.Two days later Robbie S. Robinson, a black city councilman in Savannah, Georgia, opened a virtually identical package delivered by mail to his law office; both of his arms were blown off in the ensuing explosion, and he died three hours later under surgery.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | November 27, 1999
Saying he was "absolutely tortured" by the case, a federal judge has acquitted three men accused of being Eastern Shore drug dealers, ruling the government did not prove that they were involved in the conspiracy with which they were charged.Although U.S. District Chief Judge J. Frederick Motz said he was not "suggesting prosecutorial abuse," he expressed concern about the government's growing use of conspiracy statutes, which allow evidence that would not be allowed in other criminal cases.
NEWS
By Peter Honey and Peter Honey,Washington Bureau | January 17, 1993
Three days from the presidency, Bill Clinton confronts a worl already more perilous than the one that brought him victory less than 11 weeks ago. Old enemies are up to new tricks in the Middle East; the passing of the Cold War has raised a flurry of regional conflicts around the world. Meanwhile the economy continues to confound with conflicting signs of recovery and slide, and the deficit continues to grow. Mr. Clinton faces myriad challenges. But here are 10 widely viewed as the toughest, what he said about them during the campaign and the outlook for solution:1.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Contributing Writer | February 21, 1992
BERLIN -- Once at the center of the Cold War's last great propaganda battle, Jakob Segal now sits in his cramped high-rise, pondering why no one believes his theory that the AIDS epidemic was made in Maryland."
SPORTS
By Craig Dolch and Craig Dolch,Cox News Service | March 15, 1992
VERO BEACH, Fla. -- Despite winning his past six decisions and being named UPI's Comeback Player of the Year in 1991, some wonder whether Orel Hershiser will be the same pitcher he was before undergoing radical shoulder surgery in 1990.Hershiser isn't bothered by the skepticism. He wonders, too."If one day I pronounce I'm back as far as the form of 1985 or 1988 . . . that's such a huge statement," the Los Angeles Dodgers right-hander said Wednesday during a 3-0 loss to Montreal. "I don't know if that would happen.
SPORTS
By BILL TANTON | November 29, 1994
The Washington Bullets' practice at Bowie State yesterday was nearly over when coach Jim Lynam blew the whistle, interrupting the scrimmage.Lynam knelt on one knee and looked up at his No. 1 draft choice, Juwan Howard."
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Writer | April 10, 1994
A photo accompanying an article in Sunday's Sun about th murder of an ex-Marine whose experiences were the basis for the movie "A Few Good Men" misidentified the man's attorney. )) His name is Don Marcari.The Sun regrets the errors.NEEDHAM, Mass. -- They are apparently unrelated flashes of violence, framing the final eight years of David Cox's life, from the front lines of the Cold War in Cuba to a muddy river bank in suburban Boston.The most traumatic incident of his military tour in Cuba would inspire a movie that left him indignant, his and his comrades' service careers altered to quench Hollywood's desire for drama.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 13, 2000
LOS ANGELES - Armed with a study that says watching television can teach preschoolers to read, PBS yesterday announced that it will bring a new book-friendly lineup of kids' programs to public television in September. The launch of six new shows under the banner of PBS Kids Bookworm Bunch will mark the first time in its 30-year history that PBS has offered original programs for children on Saturday mornings - a time that has traditionally been dominated by cartoons and some of the most violent action-adventure series on commercial television.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | August 9, 1996
The Washington Bullets may have to wait indefinitely for arbitrators to decide whether they have a legitimate claim to Juwan Howard after extensive pressure by NBA attorneys failed to get the Miami Heat to renounce its disputed contract with the All-Star forward."
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