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Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Michael James and Melody Simmons and Michael James,Staff Writers | August 30, 1992
Tonya Lucas sobbed as she walked past the closed caskets of her six children July 13 at Zion Baptist Church in East Baltimore. In a small room near the pulpit, she gave her soul to Christ.The next day, police charged Ms. Lucas with killing all six children.In a statement to homicide detectives, a witness -- whom police will not name -- reported that Ms. Lucas set the blaze that swept through the two-story rowhouse at 2424 E. Eager St., according to court records. The fire erupted at about 8 a.m. July 7 -- an hour before Ms. Lucas and her family were to be evicted from the house.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,SUN COLUMNIST | July 26, 1999
Vera's restaurant is a jolt of eccentricity and exotica amid a staid subdivision in Calvert County. It looks like it's right out of a movie set for "South Pacific."Banana trees line the bamboo-covered entrance. Polynesian wood carvings and Easter Island statues fill the restaurant. And the bar, about as long as an outrigger canoe, is covered with leopard-skin prints.The owner, Vera Freeman, is even more dramatic than the decor. With her flowing gowns, pearl headbands and diamond rings the size of oyster shells, she looks like she swept into town from Hollywood.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Joe Nawrozki and Robert A. Erlandson and Joe Nawrozki,Sun Staff Writers | July 1, 1994
Baltimore County detectives and FBI agents met this week to consider possible connections between the unsolved slayings of Sister Catherine Ann Cesnik and Joyce Helen Malecki, who vanished four days apart in 1969.Maj. Allan J. Webster, chief of the county's Criminal Investigation Services Division, said yesterday the agencies will meet again to compare information.Capt. Rustin Price, head of the county homicide squad, said, "We don't want to raise any false hopes, but we are checking out everything we can."
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2005
To lovers of Wild West folklore, he's Wyatt Earp - lawman, saloonkeeper, gambler, quick-triggered centerpiece of the legendary gunfight at the OK Corral. To Charles Earp Jr. of Catonsville and Pamela Earp Young of Ellicott City, he's cousin Wyatt. That the man who almost single-handedly defines the Wild West would have a couple of relatives in Maryland - and that those relatives would meet by coincidence - is perhaps not as far afield as it might seem. As it turns out, the Earp clan got its start in the United States when Thomas Earp Jr. of Ireland came to the Baltimore area in the 17th century as an indentured servant.
SPORTS
By Jackie MacMullan and Jackie MacMullan,Boston Globe | March 31, 1991
It was never a matter of memorizing dead spots on the parquet or the way the lip of the south rim bent ever so slightly. The lighting? Nothing out of the ordinary, Andrew Toney reports. In fact, said the former Philadelphia 76ers guard, the only thing special about the creaky court on 150 Causeway Street was that it served as the stage for his most famous role: the Boston Strangler."My first step out of the locker room, I was in range," Toney says. "It was easy. I have no explanation for it. It was just easy for me to score at Boston Garden."
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2012
All politics is local. All candidates for Congress are not. At least eight candidates for the U.S. House of Representatives from Maryland — including four prominent contenders — are running this year in congressional districts that do not encompass their own homes, a review of property records and recent candidate filings shows. Some live close enough to stroll into the district they are vying to represent. Others are more than an hour's drive away. Federal candidates are not required to live where they run for office.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | September 4, 1993
Remember back in grade school when you were first learning to multiply and divide? Even though the problems all dealt with colliding trains and people who seemed to have a lot of fruit on their hands, the teacher promised this was real practical stuff that you'd need later on.Well, the teacher was right -- at least, if there's a stair-building project in your future.Building stairs is an art form perfected by carpenters over the centuries. There is a lot of conventional wisdom about what makes stairs comfortable and practical.
NEWS
July 14, 1999
Prosecutor's office is open and effective and respects the lawAs the state's attorney for Baltimore, I have been and continue to be accessible and accountable. I attend community meetings, return telephone calls and respond to media and citizen inquiries. I am an honest, hardworking public servant who represents the citizens of Baltimore in a competent and responsible fashion.The Sun has interviewed me numerous times. I am the only individual in city government who has opened up her office and life to a Sun reporter.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2013
As a federal judge handed down a sentence that will virtually ensure Perry Roark spends the rest of his life behind bars, the founder of Maryland's largest home-grown prison gang renounced his association with the group. Roark, a hulking man known as "Rock," was sentenced to life in a prison Monday for his role in creating Dead Man Inc., an organization of white inmates that prosecutors said has since spread to other states and led to street violence throughout the Baltimore region.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2004
A state licensing board has indefinitely suspended a Catonsville dentist who was accused by an employee of being so high on cocaine that he didn't react after jabbing himself with a needle while working inside patients' mouths, records show. Under an order issued last month, the state Board of Dental Examiners summarily suspended the license of Charles P. Franz, 41, noting regulations that prohibit a dentist from practicing while under the influence of drugs. The board ordered him to immediately turn in his credentials.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | February 14, 2001
After more than four years in Baltimore, WJZ reporter Kathy Fowler was fired by the station earlier this month, to the surprise and dismay of colleagues. Fowler was one of the few journalists at the station who reveled in shaking loose new elements of stories that sparked strong public interest. "I just was astounded that they would let her go," said Mindy Basara, a reporter at rival WBAL. "She's a great reporter, aggressive, with a hard-news take on stories. I was never happy to see her on a story I was covering, because that meant the competition was there."
NEWS
By Patrice Comey | September 13, 1995
MY BABY DIED a month ago today. He was nine days old. Collin Edward Comey was killed by a preventable infection. I am sharing our tragedy so other mothers' babies might be saved.Our family had been happily anticipating the birth of Collin for months. Our two daughters, ages 7 and 5, were born 18 months apart and are great friends. Our first son and Collin were born 16 months apart and we had anticipated that they would become "buddies."For much of this year, our daughters were very involved in the planning for Collin's birth.
NEWS
By Thom Loverro and Thom Loverro,Carroll County Bureau of The Sun | February 3, 1991
WESTMINSTER -- Janie Hanky's father used to bark at people, spin around in circles on his shoulder and tell anyone who would listen that he was a "victim of soicumstances."What's more, millions of people have watched him do this.All of that, though, just adds to Mrs. Hanky's love and pride for her father, a clown whose work has kept generations belly-laughing and whose identity is part of 20th-century American culture.She was born 43 years ago, the daughter of Valerie Newman and Jerome Lester "Curly" Howard.
BUSINESS
March 20, 2005
Q. I am 55 years old and thinking about retiring in a year or two. Would my early retirement affect how much I receive from Social Security after I elect to take regular benefits at age 65? - B.S.K., Chicago A. Based on the way Social Security benefits are calculated and paid, you and many others should carefully reconsider your decision to retire early. Here's why. The monthly benefits you receive from Social Security depend on your average earnings over the best 35 years in your work history.
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