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Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | September 21, 1996
Before gangsta raps there were raps about libraries and teen-age pregnancy; before Dannemora State Prison and the killing bullets, there were pillow fights and the exuberance of youth.Tupac Amaru Shakur did not grow up in Baltimore. He was not a finished product when he left. But his years here encompassed that crucial time when childhood ends and self-discovery begins.He was 14 when he and his mother moved here from the Bronx in 1985. He called himself MC New York and won a rap contest sponsored by the Enoch Pratt Free Library.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 19, 2010
A half-century after his untimely death at the age of 38, celebrated tenor and movie star Mario Lanza is receiving fresh medical attention from a Baltimore doctor who takes a dim view of one of the singer's weight-loss treatments - injections of the urine of pregnant women, a controversial therapy with new followers today. Dr. Philip A. Mackowiak, vice chairman of medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and director of the Medical Care Clinical Center at the Veterans Administration Hospital downtown, teamed up with Armando Cesari, Lanza's Australia-based biographer, for an article about the singer's health issues just out in The Pharos, the journal of the medical honorary society Alpha Omega Alpha.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | February 2, 2009
It's cold outside. And as people shovel snow, scrape car windows or just spend time in the frigid air, some find that their hands and feet become numb or painful. Better get indoors or warm up, because this could mean frostbite or, more likely, frostnip, says Dr. John Wogan, attending physician in the Department of Emergency Medicine at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. What is frostbite? Frostbite is what happens when exposure to severe cold temperatures reduces blood flow and causes ice-crystals to form inside body tissues, leading to serious, even irreversible, damage.
BUSINESS
By TYEESHA DIXON and TYEESHA DIXON,SUN REPORTER | July 4, 2006
A snowball stand's success depends on two key things: hot weather and lots of hard work, say Baltimore-area purveyors of the summer treat. Add those ingredients to the crushed ice and syrup concoction that has long been a regional favorite, and summertime entrepreneurs say they can make a decent living during the season's warmest weeks. "A lot of people think it's easy to start it," said Margo Torsell, who along with family members runs a three-year-old stand on Liberty Road in Randallstown.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | April 12, 2009
Chazz Palminteri and his bus-driver dad, Lorenzo, became expert at keeping secrets. They could be gregarious, even expansive, but they knew when to shut their traps. For instance, Lorenzo Palminteri withheld crucial information about a murder that his then-9-year-old son witnessed from the family's Bronx front stoop in 1961. "At the time, I thought those men were fighting over the parking space in front of my building," says Palminteri, an Academy Award-nominated actor who specializes in playing thugs.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2011
Barbara Gaskins says she took her 15-year-old son to his bus stop every morning at 7:30, well in time for his 9 a.m. homeroom bell at Patterson High School. She obtained as many medical excuses as the doctor would allow when her son suffered from a series of stomach viruses. And she has taught her children that they have to "get an education to get somewhere in life. " But Gaskins was recently jailed for 10 days — one of the dozen parents of Baltimore City students to receive a sentence this year — after failing to send her child to school 103 of 130 days.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Sun Staff Correspondent | July 7, 1991
SAVANNAH, Ga. -- To see where the life of Clarence Thomas might have ended up, one must journey to where it began, out on the tidal flats of the Moon River just south of town, where marsh grasses bend gently to breezes that smell faintly of brine and mud.Here at a small community called Pinpoint, little has changed from June 1948 when the man President Bush has nominated for the Supreme Court was born. The shack of a crab house where his mother picked meat for a nickel a pound still stands by the murky water.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis | February 5, 1991
Q: Is tuberculosis a contagious, or "catchy" thing? Can you get it if you have sexual relations with a person who has tuberculosis? If someone does this, should he or she see a doctor for a TB test?A: Tuberculosis is contagious but it is not one of the diseases transmitted through sexual relations. The explosive problem of sexually transmitted diseases includes AIDS, syphilis, gonorrhea, herpes simplex, chlamydia, lymphogranuloma venereum, chancroid, granuloma inguinale, condyloma acuminata (genital warts)
FEATURES
By Carol Marie Cropper and Carol Marie Cropper,New York Times News Service | January 3, 1995
Carol Clark lost her job as president of the bank in Braselton, Ga., after it was auctioned in actress Kim Basinger's bankruptcy.Tom Brown, 76, was laid off five years ago when Ms. Basinger, in a burst of publicity, "bought" tiny Braselton, including the hardware store where he worked. Now he fears that he will lose his rented home as she and her investment partner prepare to sell off parts of the town, about 50 miles northeast of Atlanta, which they purchased with big development plans in mind.
NEWS
By Huntley J. Cross | November 25, 1990
There is a product that can be found in many Anne Arundel County liquor stores that I believe is dangerous and a threat to anyone who mistakes it for a wine cooler.This product is a fortified wine, which has a labeled alcohol content of 20 percent by volume (40 proof). Wine coolers have an alcohol content that ranges from 4 percent to 7 percent. Regular table wines average about 12 percent alcohol.Fortified wine, or "Cisco," comes in five flavors: red, peach, orange, berry and gold. It is bottled in two sizes: 375 and 750 milliliters.
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | August 28, 1997
Mel Gibson has been Hamlet. Kevin Costner has been Robin Hood. Woody Allen has been a romantic lead.Stranger things have happened in Hollywood than Demi Moore playing a Navy SEAL, as she does in "G.I. Jane." Director Ridley Scott's preach-athon doggedly insists women (especially surgically enhanced ones) can endure the military's most rigorous physical and mental program: Navy SEAL (sea, air, land) training.But the casting of Moore isn't what has retired SEAL Tom Hawkins up in arms about the movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2013
April 1 is the official start to the blue crab harvest in Maryland. But don't reach for your mallet just yet. "It's not time for crabs," said Jessica Borowski, a manager at Midtown BBQ and Brew. "It's too cold out. " The crabs seem to agree. The Chesapeake Bay's water temperature hasn't risen enough for the crabs to become active - and catchable. Consumers set on Maryland crabs will see limited availability for now - and prices to match. Prices for Chesapeake Bay crabs are typically high at the start of the season, and people who want them in April will have to pay even more than usual.
NEWS
By Antoinette Bosco | June 23, 1995
A FRIEND at the Bigfork Eagle, a weekly newspaper in Montana, recently sent me a fax of a newspaper article from the Daily Inter Lake in Kalispell, Mont. The headline, in big letters, read: "Justice is Served," and the story told of the execution of murderer Duncan McKenzie Jr. on May 10.Mr. McKenzie had been on death row for 20 years. His death by lethal injection was the first in Montana since 1943 and the 20th in the United States this year. Officials said he was cooperative; all he asked was to be able to listen to country music through headphones as he was being legally killed.
NEWS
By KELLY OVERTON | June 23, 2006
The pharmaceutical industry and the National Institutes of Health spend billions of dollars annually on medical research techniques that have been rendered obsolete by technological advances. Adult stem cell research is key to our status as the world's leader in medical research. The continued use of animals to test the effectiveness of medications and health interventions for humans is akin to using smoke signals instead of e-mail as a method of communication. Animal testing has never really worked.
BUSINESS
By Dean Uhler | March 31, 2002
Julie Somis of Baltimore has a historic, brick, end-of-group rowhouse next to Riverside Park in South Baltimore. The basement of the house is unfinished, with a thin concrete floor and a low ceiling. When she and her husband bought the house 11 years ago, their home inspector showed them deteriorated bricks and mortar at part of the foundation wall in the basement. The mortar is soft in places, the result of dampness in the wall leaching minerals from the mortar over the past century. Moisture has also broken down salmon bricks - bricks that are unusually soft because they were not well-fired when they were originally baked in the brick kiln.
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