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Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

NEWS
By Michelle Obama | July 2, 2012
Shelly Snell is a registered nurse. She's been married to Navy Commander Ben Snell for 16 years. They have two boys. And as a Navy family, the Snells have moved nine times, including a stint in Maryland. It's a fact of life for military spouses - when the country calls, they step up to answer. When their loved ones are sent overseas for months on end, they're holding everything together back home. When the PTA, the parish council, the Little League or the Girl Scouts need a volunteer, they're the first ones to raise their hands.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2012
Baltimore police are asking for the public's help in identifying a man they say fatally shot another man in the city's Reservoir Hill neighborhood on July 5. Police say the suspect, of whom they released a composite sketch Thursday, is a black man likely between the ages of 18 and 22. He is about 5 feet 8 inches tall and 140 pounds, with a thin build, police said. Police say he fatally shot Lance Johnson, 40, about 1:25 a.m. in the 2300 block of North Eutaw Place. Police identified Johnson as being transgender, but said there was no indication that the shooting was a hate crime.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | July 18, 1995
WHEN IT comes to news reporting, the old city-room edict is always: first, get the story; and second, get it right. When the writer gets it wrong, it's a mess. It gets the reader who knows better all upset, confuses history and puts an error in the record books. I know; I've had my share of errors.Recently, the New York Times, which is known for its excellence, included what some of us around Baltimore consider a glaring error. On Sunday, July 9, the Times published an article about Baltimore in its travel section, called "What's Doing in Baltimore," by writer Melinda Henneberger.
FEATURES
By Alan Solomon and Alan Solomon,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 6, 1996
The Fighting Irish in Ireland. What a concept. Natural-sounding as Alice in Wonderland, and potentially even curiouser.The University of Notre Dame football team, along with marching pep band, cheerleaders, flag-toters and one fist-thrusting leprechaun, all fly to Dublin this month.Then, on Nov. 2 in a stadium that seats and stands 70,000 for hurling (which is a Gaelic game resembling full-contact field hockey), Lou Holtz's squad will take on a football team representing the U.S. Naval Academy in the first Shamrock Classic.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2011
When Kevin Clash was a boy in Baltimore County, he'd watch TV mere inches from the screen and wish he could walk right into "Sesame Street. " It didn't take him long to get there. At 15, the kid from Turners Station became the regular puppeteer on a WMAR kids show. At 19, he performed as Cookie Monster in the Sesame Street float at the 1979 Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, and that night met his hero, Muppet creator Jim Henson. "Sesame Street" hired Clash in his early 20s. Before he turned 25, he took a gravel-throated red fur-ball and imbued him with a loving nature, a piping voice and a rapscallion innocence.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Staff Writer | January 18, 1994
Maryland's commuter train system is getting a major revamping with a timetable that adds midday and rush hour service, a new stop at Laurel Race Course and a cafe-parlor car that will offer food, drinks and first-class seats.The revised schedule unveiled yesterday by Mass Transit Administration goes into effect Jan. 31. State officials said the changes should make train service more convenient and reliable than in the past."What we're trying to do is enhance our service and create a more flexible schedule," said Maryland Transportation Secretary O. James Lighthizer.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2012
Kristina Suson's home wasn't part of the city's tax sale Monday, but it was a close call. Baltimore places liens on properties for unpaid property taxes, water bills and other municipal debts, then puts the liens up for auction every spring — allowing investors to buy them and either collect or move to foreclose. The city auctioned liens on about 10,600 properties on Monday, finding buyers for 6,545 of them and raising $20 million. Suson ended up on this year's list, to her surprise, after the state retroactively reduced a property tax credit she'd received in 2009.
NEWS
Mark Puente and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
The U.S. Department of Justice will conduct a civil rights investigation into allegations of brutality and misconduct by the Baltimore Police Department, Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts announced Friday. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Batts requested the probe after a six-month investigation by The Baltimore Sun found city residents have suffered battered faces and broken bones during arrests . The city has paid $5.7 million in court judgments and settlements in 102 cases since 2011, and nearly all of the people who received payouts were cleared of criminal charges, according to the investigation published this week.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2013
When reporters asked Baltimore police and state agencies where the guns used in city crimes came from, no one could provide specific information. "I can tell you that the vast majority, 95 percent plus, are committed with illegal guns," Baltimore police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi said. But he didn't use data to support that widely held assumption. Local law enforcement agencies don't have that information because of a federal blockage of gun tracing data. Police also can't reveal what gun tracing data they do have because a federal law passed a decade ago shields most firearm tracking information from the public.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2013
As they rushed toward a suburban Utah home with guns drawn, agents knew they were on to a significant figure in the Silk Road online drug bazaar - a major cocaine dealer, perhaps. Message boards on Silk Road - the world's most popular online drug market - had been buzzing about the sale that triggered this bust. Users of the encrypted website advertised drugs, forged documents and hacking tools for sale through seemingly anonymous transactions, but a kilo of pure Peruvian cocaine was something special.
NEWS
By Alec Matthew Klein and Shirley Leung and Alec Matthew Klein and Shirley Leung,SUN STAFF Paul McCardell of the research desk contributed to this article | November 24, 1995
Israel Cohen, a visionary who once drove the only truck in his family's grocery business and later turned Giant Food Inc. into the region's dominant chain, died Wednesday night, leaving a legacy of supermarket innovations but uncertainty about who will control the 59-year-old company.Mr. Cohen, known in the supermarket industry as Izzy, was 83 when he died about 11:30 p.m. at his home in Northwest Washington, surrounded by his family, after a long bout with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a form of cancer.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson | April 1, 2010
Police have made an arrest in a deadly October stabbing that occurred after a dispute in a car near a park in East Baltimore. Larry Douglas, 20, of Baltimore has been charged with first-degree murder in the stabbing of Darren Neal Green Jr., 25, of the first block of N. Woodington Road in Southwest Baltimore. Police found the wounded Green wearing women's clothing in the 1500 block of Montpelier St., near Adams Park, in the Coldstream-Homestead-Montebello neighborhood about 5 a.m. Oct. 26. A counselor said she knew Green as "Dee," and that Green identified as a woman.
FEATURES
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2013
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake will preside over a mass wedding of same-sex couples at this year's Baltimore Pride Celebration, with the event drawing interest from couples as far away as Atlanta, according to organizers. In November, Maryland became one of the first states to have same-sex marriage approved by voters in a referendum. "After doing so much work on this - on the ballot initiative - we thought, how do we really celebrate this?" said organizer Carrietta Hiers, who plans to marry her partner of nearly 13 years, Tonya Cook, at the ceremony.
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1996
BOWIE -- His reputation with the Washington Bullets has been nearly perfect, which is part of the reason the team gave him a contract worth more than $100 million. But yesterday, an embarrassed Juwan Howard found himself having to say he was sorry.Howard was apologizing after his arrest in Washington on a charge of drunken driving. The Bullets' All-Star forward was arrested at 3: 45 a.m. yesterday after his 1995 Mercedes was spotted speeding on a street in Northwest Washington.Howard, who had attended a party at a Northwest Washington club, failed a sobriety test and was charged with driving while intoxicated a short time later.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Staff Writer | May 25, 1993
Boat dealers in Maryland and across the nation are hoping that Congress will soon throw them a lifeline by repealing a luxury tax on yachts that has crippled an industry already wracked by the recession.The House is expected to vote this week on a deficit-reduction bill that includes the repeal of the 10 percent luxury tax on boats costing more than $100,000, which together with the recession cost the boating industry billions of dollars in lost sales and tens of thousands of jobs.There is strong support in both the House and Senate, and among both parties, to end the tax. Capitol Hill staffers expect the tax to be eliminated -- retroactive to Jan. 1, 1993 -- before Congress leaves for its August recess.
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