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Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

SPORTS
By Michael Vitez and Michael Vitez,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 1, 1991
PHILADELPHIA -- You can tell by the high-tops that this crowd is serious. As they stride onto the smooth, swept pavement, the trademarks flash like dog tags: Nike, Reebok, Adidas, Converse, Fila. As more and more players arrive, rap spills from a living-room speaker set next to an '80 Riviera parked courtside, announcing that the evening's action is about to commence. Sides are chosen, and soon the basketball is in play.The Moylan Recreation Center at 25th and Diamond is a proving ground, one of several playgrounds where Philadelphia's best players have always come to learn the game, to test themselves, to put their skills on display.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2005
To lovers of Wild West folklore, he's Wyatt Earp - lawman, saloonkeeper, gambler, quick-triggered centerpiece of the legendary gunfight at the OK Corral. To Charles Earp Jr. of Catonsville and Pamela Earp Young of Ellicott City, he's cousin Wyatt. That the man who almost single-handedly defines the Wild West would have a couple of relatives in Maryland - and that those relatives would meet by coincidence - is perhaps not as far afield as it might seem. As it turns out, the Earp clan got its start in the United States when Thomas Earp Jr. of Ireland came to the Baltimore area in the 17th century as an indentured servant.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dennis O'Brien and Baltimore Sun reporter | June 9, 2001
The final defendant to be sentenced in the killing of Baltimore County police Sgt. Bruce A. Prothero was given life without the possibility of parole yesterday by a judge who compared the crime to a "Wild West" shootout. Wesley Moore, 25, showed no emotion as Baltimore County Circuit Judge James T. Smith Jr. sentenced him, but the victim's widow sobbed quietly during the hearing. "You committed an act like something out of the Wild West, and you didn't even realize how outrageous it was," Smith said.
SPORTS
By Scott Fowler and Scott Fowler,Knight-Ridder News Service | February 9, 1993
MIAMI -- The Bobby Humphrey merry-go-round spun wildly again yesterday, leaving the Miami Dolphins running back with a bullet wound in his leg and a bunch of explaining to do.Humphrey was shot in the right thigh yesterday morning by Mark Steven Petties, a close friend and former football teammate of Humphrey's, as the two rode through Alabaster, Ala., in Humphrey's red Lexus.Humphrey wasn't badly hurt and was discharged from the hospital in the afternoon. The 6-foot-6, 300-pound Petties told U.S. Marshal Chris Harding at the shooting scene, 30 miles south of Birmingham: "Bobby was driving fast and crazy.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 1, 2005
How long do the fatigue and "brain fog" last after general anesthesia for surgery? It depends - on your age, the specific drugs used, how long the surgery took and how healthy you were to start with. These days, most general anesthesia is short-acting, which means you wake up quickly and the drugs are mostly out of your system within a few hours, said Dr. Carl Rosow, an anesthesiologist at Massachusetts General Hospital. But tiny amounts can linger for up to seven days - enough so that you may not feel completely normal, especially if you also have a drink or two. Moreover, if you are one of the unlucky 20 percent to 40 percent of patients who have nausea and vomiting after general anesthesia, that can add considerably to your recovery time because of dehydration and weakness from not eating, said Dr. John Ulatowski, director and chair of the department of anesthesia and critical care at Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions.
NEWS
By Peter Honey and Peter Honey,Washington Bureau | January 17, 1993
Three days from the presidency, Bill Clinton confronts a worl already more perilous than the one that brought him victory less than 11 weeks ago. Old enemies are up to new tricks in the Middle East; the passing of the Cold War has raised a flurry of regional conflicts around the world. Meanwhile the economy continues to confound with conflicting signs of recovery and slide, and the deficit continues to grow. Mr. Clinton faces myriad challenges. But here are 10 widely viewed as the toughest, what he said about them during the campaign and the outlook for solution:1.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | May 22, 1995
"The CBS Evening News With Dan Rather and Connie Chung" was supposed to have a local flavor for Baltimore viewers tonight. Chung was scheduled to co-anchor the broadcast from WJZ -- CBS' Baltimore affiliate -- to give the station a ratings boost on the final week of May sweeps.Instead, Rather will be anchoring alone tonight, and it looks as if Chung is out of a job altogether.CBS News President Eric Ober announced Saturday that, as of today, Rather would be anchoring alone. Furthermore, Ober said, Chung's future at the network was uncertain.
NEWS
By KELLY OVERTON | June 23, 2006
The pharmaceutical industry and the National Institutes of Health spend billions of dollars annually on medical research techniques that have been rendered obsolete by technological advances. Adult stem cell research is key to our status as the world's leader in medical research. The continued use of animals to test the effectiveness of medications and health interventions for humans is akin to using smoke signals instead of e-mail as a method of communication. Animal testing has never really worked.
NEWS
By Jonathan Wixen | November 16, 2010
Is litter like murder? Not exactly, perhaps — but it's worse than you probably think. According to donttrashaz.com, more than 25,000 car accidents a year are linked to litter, scores of which result in fatalities. Of course, the environmental effects of litter are well known. Trash in the streets gets blown into the sewer system. From there, it clogs up the sewers and waterways or flows out into bays and estuaries. Chemicals and toxins from plastic bottles leech into water systems.
FEATURES
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2005
The Washington Wizards may have sent him packing, but Juan Dixon has wasted no time rebounding from the rejection. The former Maryland basketball star came a step closer this week to signing an $8 million, three-year deal with the Portland Trail Blazers just weeks after the Wizards dumped him. But before heading West, Dixon is scheduled to seal a deal of a different sort tonight when he marries his high school sweetheart, Robyn Bragg, in a ceremony at...
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr | January 16, 1992
Carefully arranged on a bed of ice, the fish on the counter at Capitol Seafood in Jessup looked like a still-life composition.Gold-striped wild rockfish, their lips sporting blue plastic tags, lay in the upper left corner. Just below them were the smaller, dish-faced hybrid rocks raised on farms. To the right, the bright color of several red snappers contrasted with the plain brown of the flounder below.Framed by these lesser species, two large, silver-sided creatures formed the composition's centerpiece.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | September 21, 1998
Ryan Minor took a few steps out of the Orioles' dugout last night, turned to look inside, then jogged slowly to third base. Perhaps he was checking to make sure no one was following him.Eleven days had passed since Minor's promotion from Double-A, and already he was treading on sacred ground. He hoped only to keep from falling.Without warning, Minor took the position that had belonged exclusively to Cal Ripken for the past two seasons, ending a consecutive-games streak that stretched to eternity.
NEWS
By Huntley J. Cross | November 25, 1990
There is a product that can be found in many Anne Arundel County liquor stores that I believe is dangerous and a threat to anyone who mistakes it for a wine cooler.This product is a fortified wine, which has a labeled alcohol content of 20 percent by volume (40 proof). Wine coolers have an alcohol content that ranges from 4 percent to 7 percent. Regular table wines average about 12 percent alcohol.Fortified wine, or "Cisco," comes in five flavors: red, peach, orange, berry and gold. It is bottled in two sizes: 375 and 750 milliliters.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
One of the more well-known, but less understood, rules about oysters says that they should be eaten only during months that have an "R," so from May to August, they should be off the menu. This guideline goes back hundreds of years and is rooted in lack of reliable refrigeration and a need to allow oysters to reproduce during the summer months. When oysters reproduce, they become weak and may be susceptible to disease. Today, thanks to modern refrigeration and the development of new breeds of oysters that do not reproduce in the summer, oysters are fine to eat any time.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2013
A Baltimore County jury on Tuesday rejected a White Marsh woman's claim that the only way to end years of spousal abuse was to hire a hit man to kill her husband. The jury, composed of nine women and three men, convicted Karla Porter of first-degree murder in a case that tested the scope of self-defense arguments. The 51-year-old defendant stood stoically in a dark pant suit with her long red hair tightly braided as the jury foreman read the verdict, which could send her to prison for the rest of her life without the possibility of parole.
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