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Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2010
Maryland Natural Resources police have interviewed the young fisherman who reported spying an alligator in the Patapsco River. And they say they believe him. But a preliminary search of the area late Monday failed to turn up any further evidence of the tropical reptile. "We believe the gentleman. That's why we sent an officer out to investigate," said Sgt. Art Windemuth, spokesman for the Department of Natural Resources Police. Animal control officers also joined the search. But no alligator appeared.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Staff Writer | April 6, 1993
Jerome Page, a paroled murderer, showed no surprise yesterday when a Baltimore County jury convicted him in less than an hour of the rape, sodomy and murder of a 15-year-old Halethorpe runaway last June.Judge Barbara Kerr Howe warned friends and relatives of the victim, Amanda Lee Hall, against making any outburst. Helen Hall, the victim's mother, who often wept or left the courtroom during the sometimes graphic testimony, said of the verdict, "No matter what they do, it's not going to bring her back."
FEATURES
By Young Chang and Young Chang,Contributing Writer | August 16, 1998
Two Virginia babies were switched at birth three years ago, the world learned recently. Since then, talk has abounded: How often does this happen, why and how?Answers are only speculative, but the statistics are startling.About 28,000 babies get switched in hospitals every year, temporarily or permanently, out of four million births, says Nicholas Webb, vice president of technology for Talon Medical Limited, a San Antonio, Texas-based vendor of a new high-tech ID bracelet for newborns. He says his figures are from a 1996 study by Inter/Action Associates, a Las Vegas, Nev.-based security consulting firm.
SPORTS
By Heather A. Dinich | August 17, 2005
SHE WAS a petite reporter with blond hair, seemingly perfect skin and tan, and toned legs that caught the players' eyes as she wandered around the Philadelphia Phillies' locker room in a knee-length skirt. I remember wondering if she was sleeping with any of them. Then, I wondered if she thought the same thing about me. Truth is, it happens. But not like the media or Hollywood might lead you to believe. It doesn't make it any easier to establish credibility, though, when someone like Fox sports reporter Carolyn Hughes allegedly crosses the line.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | December 4, 2009
It couldn't look any less impressive, this pocket-size, 40-page pamphlet self-published by an unidentified Boston author back in 1827. "Tamerlane and Other Poems" sold for $662,500 at Christie's auction house this afternoon in New York, according to Christie's officials. There is no word on the buyer. This collection of poems is the rarest of Edgar Allan Poe memorabilia, a first edition of his first published work. Twelve copies of "Tamerlane and Other Poems," whose author is identified only as "A Bostonian," are known to exist (only 50 were printed)
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Staff Writer | May 13, 1993
After telling police he sodomized and strangled a 15-year-old runaway, Tyrone Page told Baltimore County homicide detectives that he blamed the girl for what happened last June."
NEWS
By Lon Wagner and Lon Wagner,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 15, 2003
NORFOLK, Va. -- Shortly after Nat Turner led a slave revolt that killed nearly 60 white Southside residents in 1831, his head was chopped off and carted away for study. His captors hoped that it would offer clues to his motives and to what many thought to be the Southampton County man's exceptional intelligence. But the answers never came. Turner's skull disappeared somewhere along the way, creating another twist in the story of a man who was either a ruthless murderer or a courageous liberator.
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | December 26, 1996
TWO-HEADED GIANT FOUND IN FELLS POINT!No way, you say. Preposterous. Unbelievable, improbable, implausible, inconceivable, infeasible, in fact, down right impossible, you say.OK, then -- what, or who, is that in the display case of the Antique Man in the 1700 block of Fleet Street?Robert Gerber, 53, shoulder-length hair gone to white, says it is Kap-Dwa (homo gigantis), slain warrior of ancient time. Odysseus and Aeneas might have come across the 12-foot giant, had their travels gone by way of Patagonia in the far reaches of South America.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 1, 2005
How long do the fatigue and "brain fog" last after general anesthesia for surgery? It depends - on your age, the specific drugs used, how long the surgery took and how healthy you were to start with. These days, most general anesthesia is short-acting, which means you wake up quickly and the drugs are mostly out of your system within a few hours, said Dr. Carl Rosow, an anesthesiologist at Massachusetts General Hospital. But tiny amounts can linger for up to seven days - enough so that you may not feel completely normal, especially if you also have a drink or two. Moreover, if you are one of the unlucky 20 percent to 40 percent of patients who have nausea and vomiting after general anesthesia, that can add considerably to your recovery time because of dehydration and weakness from not eating, said Dr. John Ulatowski, director and chair of the department of anesthesia and critical care at Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2013
When "XXL" revealed the cover of its March "Freshman Class" issue - the hip-hop magazine's annual anointment of rising rappers most poised for major success - there was a fresh-faced, parka-wearing kid in the bottom-right corner, throwing a peace sign as a couple of gold chains hung from his neck. It was Sir Robert Bryson Hall II, better known as Logic, a 23-year-old rapper born and raised in Gaithersburg. Less than a month after the "XXL" cover was announced, Logic, who headlines the Fillmore Silver Spring on Sunday, signed to Def Jam Recordings, a label that has been synonymous with hip-hop prestige since producer Rick Rubin founded it in 1983.
FEATURES
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 17, 1995
Green Bay, Wis. -- It took two days to find Tom Monfils' body, sunk to the bottom of a giant paper mill pulp vat, a 45-pound weight around his neck. It took 2 1/2 years to charge six co-workers in his murder.When the arrests finally came last month, weary police detectives paused quietly for a beer. The Green Bay Press-Gazette put out a rare special edition. And in a tidy brick house on South Roosevelt Avenue, Joan and Edwin Monfils gave thanks that someone, at last, would have to answer for the death of their son."
TRAVEL
By Brendan A. Maher and Brendan A. Maher,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | May 4, 2000
It's a hit on MTV, but the band Bloodhound Gang will find itself being tuned out by many students at the University of Maryland, College Park tomorrow night. Citing song lyrics they say are extraordinarily offensive, several student groups have threatened public demonstrations, boycotts and letters urging other acts to cancel if the group is not pulled from the lineup scheduled to perform as part of the campus' annual Art Attack event. Particularly upset are students of Asian descent, who say the band's lyrics are racially charged and culturally insensitive.
NEWS
By Linell Smith and Fred Rasmussen and Linell Smith and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writers Sun staff writer Jacques Kelly and librarian Doris Carberry contributed to this article | November 20, 1994
In the early years of this century, when Cab Calloway was growing up in West Baltimore's Sugar Hill, the neighborhood his family called home was considered the political, cultural and business hub of black society.He was the son of middle-class professionals. His mother, Martha Eulalia Reed, was a Morgan State College graduate who taught school. His father, Cabell Calloway, graduated from Lincoln University in Pennsylvania and worked as a lawyer.Young Cab Calloway even had his own car in high school -- a used 1923 Oldsmobile he'd bought with $275 he'd earned working -- a rarity in that era, particularly for a black man."
NEWS
By David Simon and David Simon,Staff Writer | March 16, 1992
"You don't look so good," says the cop, smiling. "You look like death."Possum nods, the gaunt face bobbing. The Virus hangs on him, hangs on everything in the rented room. Three decades of firing heroin and thieving and turning over criminals to police at $50 to $100 a head, but it isn't a penitentiary or a bullet or a lethal dose that claims him."Yeah, I been sick, you know," says Possum in a mumble, his stick-leg stretched over a table. "I been sick but I'm back now."Possum, showing some life, talking about working.
SPORTS
By Steve Jacobson and Steve Jacobson,Newsday | October 8, 1992
"Here's the deal," he said to the waiter. "I want a mushroom burger with Cheddar cheese instead of Swiss. No, forget it. Let's do the old English burger with lettuce, tomato and onion, which I see there."See, Dexter Manley was reading the menu. Dexter, who graduated from high school and stayed eligible to play four years at Oklahoma State when he couldn't read, then starred with the Washington Redskins, could handle Houlihans' menu. He made more sense than the waiter, actually."I can read my own book," said Dexter, and proceeded to open it to a random passage and read it. It tells how he got the courage to go to the Lab School in Washington for help learning to read because it was too painful not to.The book is "Educating Dexter," which is the sequel to the locker-room whispers of "Dexter can't read."
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