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Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

TOPIC
By SCOTT SHANE | June 20, 1999
ON JULY 24, 1863, three weeks after the Battle of Gettysburg, Union officers freed the inmates of a slave trader's jail on Pratt Street near the Baltimore harbor. They found a grisly scene."In this place I found 26 men, 1 boy, 29 women and 3 infants," Col. William Birney of the U.S. Colored Troops wrote to his commanding officer. "Sixteen of the men were shackled and one had his legs chained together by ingeniously contrived locks connected by chains suspended to his waist."The slaves were confined in sweltering cells or in the bricked-in yard of "Cam- liu's slave-pen," where "no tree or shrub grows" and "the mid-day sun pours down its scorching rays," Birney wrote.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | June 2, 1998
NEW YORK -- He was Secretariat's best friend.But when Eddie Sweat died in April at age 59, he was destitute. His family couldn't afford to bury him.So a charitable organization paid for the funeral. And a former employer paid for Sweat's widow and two daughters to travel from their home in New York City to Sweat's home state of South Carolina.There, on April 24, a group primarily of relatives -- no one from Secretariat's inner circle was present -- gathered at Rock Hill A.M.E. Church in Vance, S.C., to bid farewell to Edward "Shorty" Sweat.
NEWS
By Joe Stumpe and Joe Stumpe,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 6, 2005
Sometimes only roast beef will do. You know the kind of roast we're talking about - seasoned crust, big beefy flavor and juicy center. Not a fancy steak you can cut with a butter knife, or a pot roast braised until it's falling apart, but an honest piece of meat with flavor and texture. The problem is how to achieve this ideal roast. All too often, roast beef turns out as tough, dry, stringy and flavorless as the proverbial shoe leather. In fact, I'm convinced that's why roast beef seems to turn up on a lot fewer tables these days.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dennis O'Brien and Baltimore Sun reporter | June 9, 2001
The final defendant to be sentenced in the killing of Baltimore County police Sgt. Bruce A. Prothero was given life without the possibility of parole yesterday by a judge who compared the crime to a "Wild West" shootout. Wesley Moore, 25, showed no emotion as Baltimore County Circuit Judge James T. Smith Jr. sentenced him, but the victim's widow sobbed quietly during the hearing. "You committed an act like something out of the Wild West, and you didn't even realize how outrageous it was," Smith said.
NEWS
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,Sun Staff | April 16, 2000
NEW YORK -- Don't hate fashion designer Matt Nye because he's beautiful, or because he's the companion of media maverick Jann Wenner, or because he's traveled through Europe in five-star style with former boss Ralph Lauren. "Yes, good looks, youth, a level of notoriety, can open doors. For whatever reason people may be curious about me," says Nye, 34, while lounging in his Upper West Side studio. "What you choose to do with those opportunities once they're created is up to you. In the end, it's your work that's going to speak louder than who you're with or what you look like."
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | December 16, 1995
A Harford County man was convicted yesterday of fatally stabbing and robbing a Middle River minister last Christmas Eve in a dispute over their use of crack cocaine.A Baltimore County Circuit Court jury of six men and six women took about an hour and a half to find James Thomas Wood, 25, of Abingdon guilty of first-degree premeditated murder and robbery with a deadly weapon. He faces a maximum term of life without parole plus 20 years in prison when Judge Christian M. Kahl sentences him Feb. 16.Last Dec. 23, Wood and the Rev. Samuel N. Booth Jr., 55 -- who lived alone in a trailer behind Christian Faith Tabernacle Church on Middle River Road -- consumed more than two dozen bags of crack cocaine and spent the night in a motel together, according to testimony.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | May 22, 1995
"The CBS Evening News With Dan Rather and Connie Chung" was supposed to have a local flavor for Baltimore viewers tonight. Chung was scheduled to co-anchor the broadcast from WJZ -- CBS' Baltimore affiliate -- to give the station a ratings boost on the final week of May sweeps.Instead, Rather will be anchoring alone tonight, and it looks as if Chung is out of a job altogether.CBS News President Eric Ober announced Saturday that, as of today, Rather would be anchoring alone. Furthermore, Ober said, Chung's future at the network was uncertain.
FEATURES
By Lara M. Zeises and Lara M. Zeises,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1997
Penni Wilson loves M&Ms. She buys a pack of them every day on her break from her department store job at East Point Mall. The red ones are her favorite."
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2011
A Baltimore pastor who paid a hit man $50,000 in church funds to kill someone for life insurance payouts bought similar indemnity policies on his boyfriend when the pair were fighting, along with contracts on the man's mother and daughter, he testified Friday in city Circuit Court. He canceled them after time, however, "because we were getting along," he said. The admission was one of many confessions Kevin Pushia offered from the witness stand during the trial of his alleged accomplices, brothers James "Omar" Clea and Kareem Clea.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 1, 2005
How long do the fatigue and "brain fog" last after general anesthesia for surgery? It depends - on your age, the specific drugs used, how long the surgery took and how healthy you were to start with. These days, most general anesthesia is short-acting, which means you wake up quickly and the drugs are mostly out of your system within a few hours, said Dr. Carl Rosow, an anesthesiologist at Massachusetts General Hospital. But tiny amounts can linger for up to seven days - enough so that you may not feel completely normal, especially if you also have a drink or two. Moreover, if you are one of the unlucky 20 percent to 40 percent of patients who have nausea and vomiting after general anesthesia, that can add considerably to your recovery time because of dehydration and weakness from not eating, said Dr. John Ulatowski, director and chair of the department of anesthesia and critical care at Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | December 8, 2001
GREENBELT - Before they were killed, Norman Stribbling, William Robert Gray and Clarence Goode each told friends that a dangerous woman was after them. All three were shot to death, Stribbling in 1974, Gray in 1990 and Goode in 1996. The woman they feared had been married to Stribbing and Gray and had been Goode's girlfriend. Police and prosecutors say Josephine Gray escaped justice for 27 years by using violence and voodoo to intimidate people, according to papers released by court officials yesterday.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2005
An owner of a popular city restaurant and a man who brandished a handgun in a DVD that threatened informers with death were among 13 people indicted yesterday for their alleged roles in a violent Northwest Baltimore drug gang. A federal grand jury handed up the 20-count indictment. It charges that from 1995 to 2004, the gang, known as the Rice Organization, distributed 1,500 kilograms of cocaine and heroin. The indictment seeks forfeiture of $27 million in criminal proceeds in addition to houses and luxury vehicles.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | September 4, 1993
Remember back in grade school when you were first learning to multiply and divide? Even though the problems all dealt with colliding trains and people who seemed to have a lot of fruit on their hands, the teacher promised this was real practical stuff that you'd need later on.Well, the teacher was right -- at least, if there's a stair-building project in your future.Building stairs is an art form perfected by carpenters over the centuries. There is a lot of conventional wisdom about what makes stairs comfortable and practical.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | June 25, 1993
WASHINGTON -- When archaeologists excavated 18 graves at a 3-century-old Calvert County plantation a few years ago, they had no headstones, no diaries, no letters and no church records. Nothing to tell the stories of those long-vanished colonists.Now Douglas H. Ubelaker, an anthropologist at the Smithsonian Institution, has made the bones talk.By studying wear and tear and the shapes and sizes of the bones, Dr. Ubelaker has produced grim snapshots of life on a mid-17th century Maryland settlement: of shoulders strained by heavy lifting and hauling, of clay pipes puffed habitually through clenched teeth, of bones made brittle by disease, of malnutrition and early death.
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