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Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

NEWS
By Kathleen Purvis and Kathleen Purvis,McClatchy-Tribune | February 27, 2008
My oven has convection-roast and convection-bake settings. I understand convection is a heat-circulating fan, but the roast vs. baking part confuses me. What difference does it make to the oven if I leave the lid off a meat pan? In food language, roast and bake really aren't different. Both are done in an open pan, usually in an oven. We refer to cooking meats and vegetables in an open pan as roasting, while cakes, cookies and pies are baked. But convection, which uses fans to circulate air, is a different beast.
FEATURES
By Scott Shane|| TC and Scott Shane|| TC,SUN STAFF | April 13, 1997
Storrs, Conn. -- Standing near Beth Usher on the sidelines of a school soccer game, a rude stranger noticed the partial paralysis of the teen-ager's right hand. "What happened to you, honey?" the woman asked. And Beth, in less than the split-second of a kick on goal, sent her answer spinning back. "I was injured in the Vietnam War," she replied, training her calm, brown eyes on the woman.Humor is the fence she has built around her feelings. It is the barrier between Beth Usher the medical miracle and Beth Usher the teen-ager struggling to be normal, who likes jigsaw puzzles and creative writing, women's basketball and "Ferris Bueller's Day Off."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2005
If you're going to see and hear David Sedaris read at the Meyerhoff on Sunday, keep this in mind: He'll most likely be watching you, too. "He goes on these tours and will read stories that he's working on, and I think there is a kind of feedback that he gets from the audience," says Geoff Kloske, who published Sedaris' first books for Little, Brown. His longtime agent Steve Barclay agrees that the tour is part of Sedaris' creative process. Sedaris is the best-selling author of six books, including Me Talk Pretty One Day and, most recently, Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2005
An Ellicott City man once wanted by the FBI for faking his identity as a dentist was being held without bail yesterday at the Howard County Detention Center after turning himself in Saturday, claiming he had killed his ex-wife, Howard County police said. Ghafour "Billy" Asemani, 38, walked into police headquarters about 8 a.m. and told the officer at the front desk that he had killed Samira Salmassi, 38, the mother of his three children, that morning during an argument in which he struck her with a tape recorder and "placed his hands around her neck," according to court records.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff | August 26, 1996
You can see fall coming as surely as you can see a candle flame snuffed by the wind. At twilight, watch any grass field or woods where this summer's fireflies, nourished by a wet spring, rose in great numbers. Now their dwindling lights tell us autumn is on the way.Think of it as the lightning bugs' parting signal in a brief life of signals.Seven days on the planet between June and mid-August, that's about all the adult lightning bug has in temperate zones. Time for the males to rise from the ground at twilight or night, fly through the darkness flashing, looking for a mate.
FEATURES
By Nancy Imperiale Wellons and Nancy Imperiale Wellons,ORLANDO SENTINEL | July 9, 2001
Sara Joanne Byrd Rogers has been married to a guy named Fred for 49 years as of today. This is not all Joanne has accomplished in 73 years of life. She's a concert pianist, for starters, which is no small potatoes. She also raised two sons and has two grandkids. She's on the board of trustees at Rollins College in her native Florida, where she calls the president by a pet name. She's the bee's knees of a best friend, say her pals - the kind who calls just to check on a little thing that was bothering you. She loves the word "love," and often says "I must say!"
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | March 17, 1995
OAKLAND, Calif. -- Kyong-A Ha's relatives, seeking a cure for the insomnia she had suffered for years, tried psychology and medication without success.So the Korean woman's family turned to Emeryville evangelist Jean Park, who saw demons as the source of the problem and decided to cast them out through prayer.It was a decision that apparently led to Ms. Ha's death.During an attempted exorcism last week that lasted as long as six hours, Ms. Park, her mother and three other women tried to oust the spirits, hitting the 25-year-old woman as many as 100 times on the chest and face, breaking at least 10 of her ribs and muffling her cries while Ha strained to be free, police said yesterday.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | May 28, 1994
CHICAGO -- She sat in Suite No. 450 at Comiskey Park, her 2-year-old son munching a hot dog, her 2-month-old daughter letting out an occasional cry.Now came the true test for Frank Thomas' wife.All right, Elise, White Sox or Orioles?The question might seem ridiculous, considering that her husband is one of the biggest sports heroes in Chicago, with a contract that could keep him in a White Sox uniform through the year 2000.But let's talk roots.Elise Thomas is formerly a Silver, a Rochester Silver, a Rochester Red Wings Silver.
FEATURES
By Steven Raichlen and Steven Raichlen,Contributing Writer | August 2, 1992
At the risk of sounding older than I really am, I remember the days before lime became chic, when fresh limes were hard to find and most cooks had to make do with the sour juice in a fruit-shaped squeeze bottle.That was before la nouvelle cuisine made lime the premier citrus fruit of the '80s. It was also before Perrier, with its inevitable wedge of lime, became the quaff of a nation. Few Northerners had ever tasted a Key lime. As for the perfumed kaffir lime from Thailand, it might as well have grown on the moon.
NEWS
By Marc LeGoff and Marc LeGoff,Staff writer | July 28, 1991
At 14, an age when most boys' biggest concern is making the junior varsity baseball team, Allan Stover served aboard the Coast Guard cutter Basswood during the closing months of the Korean War.Stover, then a "semi-rebellious" Cleveland teen-ager who lived with his divorced mother, lied to the Coast Guard recruiting office about his age, intercepted the parental waiver forms sent through the mail and reported to boot camp in January 1953.Eager to share his experiences with others like him, Stover, 53, of Ellicott City, has founded the Veterans of Underage Military Service.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | September 29, 2001
A 22-year-old Laurel man found guilty in the fatal beating of his 3-year-old son was sentenced to 30 years in prison yesterday in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court. Rodney Lamar Dickerson Sr., of the 3400 block of Andrew Court, was convicted by a jury July 19 on charges of second-degree murder and murder by child abuse in the death of his son, Rodney Lamar Dickerson Jr. It was the county's first prosecution of a "murder by child abuse" case. Weighing just 43 pounds, Rodney Jr. was so severely beaten in August of last year that his liver was nearly split in half, and his abdomen and chest were too filled with blood for him to breathe, a medical expert testified during the July trial.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington | kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | January 25, 2010
When patients are in the throes of a heart attack, there's no question that stents save lives. But for heart patients with few symptoms and less than severe artery blockage, whether to use a stent is a question with no clear-cut answer, say cardiologists. In fact, these days some heart experts say the mesh metal tubes used to keep narrowed or weakened arteries propped open are overused for blockages that can be treated just as well with medicine, a healthy diet and exercise. A recent internal review of heart patients at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson found 369 patients received the coronary implants unnecessarily.
SPORTS
By Jackie MacMullan and Jackie MacMullan,Boston Globe | March 31, 1991
It was never a matter of memorizing dead spots on the parquet or the way the lip of the south rim bent ever so slightly. The lighting? Nothing out of the ordinary, Andrew Toney reports. In fact, said the former Philadelphia 76ers guard, the only thing special about the creaky court on 150 Causeway Street was that it served as the stage for his most famous role: the Boston Strangler."My first step out of the locker room, I was in range," Toney says. "It was easy. I have no explanation for it. It was just easy for me to score at Boston Garden."
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2014
Two Towson University students edged out 170 other teams to win a national debate championship held in Indiana this week, the second time in recent years a Towson team has netted national debate honors. Ameena Ruffin and Korey Johnson, both from Baltimore, bested a team from the University of Oklahoma in the final round. Their argument likened police brutality, the prison-industrial complex and structural poverty issues to a warlike violence against African-Americans in the U.S. and identified solutions.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2013
When reporters asked Baltimore police and state agencies where the guns used in city crimes came from, no one could provide specific information. "I can tell you that the vast majority, 95 percent plus, are committed with illegal guns," Baltimore police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi said. But he didn't use data to support that widely held assumption. Local law enforcement agencies don't have that information because of a federal blockage of gun tracing data. Police also can't reveal what gun tracing data they do have because a federal law passed a decade ago shields most firearm tracking information from the public.
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