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Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

NEWS
By Julia Reed | October 14, 2013
“If you can walk, you can jump,” says Danny Serpico, whose new business venture relies on the fun (and vigor) of bouncing. The 31,000-square-foot Sky Zone Indoor Trampoline Park -- more trampoline than flooring -- has a lineup of activities for a variety of ages. Dodgeball, basketball and a foam pit appeal to teens and tweens for special events on Friday and Saturday nights, while toddlers get their own special jump time on Tuesday and Thursday mornings. “It's a safe environment that you can bring your family and friends,” says manager Serpico, a Columbia native.
BUSINESS
March 20, 2005
Q. I am 55 years old and thinking about retiring in a year or two. Would my early retirement affect how much I receive from Social Security after I elect to take regular benefits at age 65? - B.S.K., Chicago A. Based on the way Social Security benefits are calculated and paid, you and many others should carefully reconsider your decision to retire early. Here's why. The monthly benefits you receive from Social Security depend on your average earnings over the best 35 years in your work history.
NEWS
By Page Huidekoper Wilson | September 28, 1990
UNLESS immediate action is taken, by the year 2000 one-third of the world's children between 5 and 16 will be living on the street.Street children and the host of other problems facing children, including those in the United States, have prompted UNICEF, the United Nations children's fund, to organize a "World Summit for Children" this weekend in New York. President Bush is among 70 heads of state (probably the largest gathering of heads of state in history) committed to attend the first-ever PageHuidekoperWilsonworld conference on children.
NEWS
By MARY BETH REGAN and MARY BETH REGAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 28, 2006
My child has been complaining of ankle and foot pain. I talked briefly with a friend who is a physical therapist. Could it be his shoes? It could be your child's shoes. But then, it could be something more serious. Kevin Crowley, a physical therapist and manager of Towson Sports Medicine Center, says any time a child is complaining of reoccurring pain, you should consult your physician. "As physical therapists," Crowley says, "we really can't diagnose patients. We help implement the treatment."
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 11, 1997
My 8-year-old daughter has been coughing up blood. Otherwise, she seems fine.How worried should I be about this?Coughing up blood (called hemoptysis by doctors) should always be taken seriously.It is an unusual symptom in childhood. When it does occur, it may be a sign of a lung disease that requires treatment.Before listing some of the most common causes of hemoptysis during childhood, we want to point out that it is not always easy to tell whether the blood is coming from the lungs or the stomach, but both are important.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 18, 1997
My 10-year old developed a bad cold with fever and a hard cough last week. In general, he seems better, but he is still coughing. Now he says his chest hurts. Should I be worried?If your son's chest hurts only when he coughs, the pain is probably due to sore chest and abdominal muscles. Coughing is hard work. It can put extra strain on muscles not used to working so hard, just as starting a new sport or exercise program might.Make yourself cough as you read this, and feel how much more deeply you inhale and how much more forcefully your chest and abdominal muscles move in than they do during a normal breath.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | June 7, 2000
A 19-year-old honors student convicted of strangling his girlfriend and burying her in a shallow grave because she broke up with him was sentenced in Baltimore Circuit Court yesterday to spend the rest of his life behind bars. Adnan Masud Syed maintained his innocence at his sentencing on first-degree murder and kidnapping convictions, even as his attorney asked Judge Wanda K. Heard for mercy when punishing Syed because the killing was "a crime of passion." "He made a bad decision," Syed's attorney, Charles H. Dorsey III, told Heard.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and michael.dresser@baltsun.com | December 1, 2008
Avoiding the purgatory that is Interstate 95 on a holiday weekend is not all that difficult if you're heading from Baltimore to the Northeast. Pennsylvania offers a wide choice of routes to scoot to the west of Philadelphia and invade New Jersey. Going south is more difficult.There aren't that many great options when you're heading to Richmond or beyond at peak travel times. The obvious route is to take the Capital Beltway to the Woodrow Wilson Bridge and follow I-95 south.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN ARTS WRITER | February 28, 2002
The question, as it always is, is this: What about the bear? At Baltimore's Center Stage, it gallumphs into view, roaring and huffing, a great, blue manifestation of what must be Shakespeare's most bizarre stage direction. Blue? Yes, blue. "Exit, pursued by a bear," instructed Shakespeare in Act III, Scene 3 of The Winter's Tale. What was the Bard thinking? Did he intend for a real bear - or perhaps a man in a costume - to appear on stage? Should it be scary or amusing? Was the playwright who would become the most revered writer in the English language toying with the directors of his day, or toying with us?
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Staff Writer | August 20, 1992
The moment was certainly not a highlight in Todd Frohwirth's major-league career, but it is bound to make some baseball highlight shows in the next few days.Maybe for the rest of the season.When have you seen a player throw a ball against the screen in disgust after getting ejected, then toss both his cap and his glove back onto the playing field before leaving?Frohwirth -- or is it Throwirth? -- did all that after being tossed by home plate umpire Larry Barnett in the fourth inning of last night's wild 10-8 defeat to the Seattle Mariners at Camden Yards.
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr | January 16, 1992
Carefully arranged on a bed of ice, the fish on the counter at Capitol Seafood in Jessup looked like a still-life composition.Gold-striped wild rockfish, their lips sporting blue plastic tags, lay in the upper left corner. Just below them were the smaller, dish-faced hybrid rocks raised on farms. To the right, the bright color of several red snappers contrasted with the plain brown of the flounder below.Framed by these lesser species, two large, silver-sided creatures formed the composition's centerpiece.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | September 24, 1994
A well-built cinder-block wall can be a thing of beauty -- sides that are straight, courses that are level, space that is neatly enclosed.Cinder-block walls are the foundation of choice in new construction, but rehabbers might find a need for such a wall in an addition, in rebuilding a failed masonry wall, or in walling in an urban garden. The outside of the block wall can be finished with facing bricks, or parged or stuccoed for a more finished look.The first step in building a block wall is pouring a concrete footing for the blocks to rest on. The footing has to be below frost line and as level as you can make it. For a foundation wall with 7 courses (rows)
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
After playing at being a TV correspondent and doing some of the worst on-air network reporting I have seen in 30 years of writing about media, Chelsea Clinton is declaring victory and moving on, she told People magazine. Here's an indication of how People reported this "exclusive" news: After not quite three years as a special correspondent for NBC News - and with just a little while until she and husband Marc Mezvinsky are expected to become parents - the former first daughter is now leaving that position, she tells PEOPLE in a statement, "to continue focusing on my work at the Clinton Foundation and as Marc and I look forward to welcoming our first child.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | November 30, 2001
Calling his crime "diabolical," a Howard County judge sentenced Paul Stephen Riggins, the Elkridge man convicted of killing his long-missing wife, to life in prison yesterday. Before imposing the sentence and with crying friends of Nancy Lee Riggins huddled on courtroom benches, Judge Lenore R. Gelfman noted that the killing left the couple's only child, Amanda, who turns 11 tomorrow, without either parent - and friends and family without a grave to visit. "The family has no place to mourn, no sense of closure," she said.
NEWS
By Alexander S. Belenky and Richard C. Larson | November 6, 2012
Ohio, Virginia, Florida: If you don't live in one of these or a few other "battleground" states, you may feel disenfranchised in U.S. presidential elections. As a Marylander, no major party candidate competes for your vote - even if the nationwide polls suggest that the election is close. Whether you are part of a voter majority or voter minority, a Democrat, a Republican or something else, as a Maryland resident you simply cannot affect the state outcome under the current "winner-take-all" system.
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