Advertisement

Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

NEWS
By From staff reports | February 4, 1999
In Baltimore CountyInformation sought on woman missing since mid-JanuaryREISTERSTOWN -- Police are asking the public's help to find an 18-year-old woman who has been missing for three weeks.Hae Min Lee, who lived with family members in the 7300 block of Rockridge Road, was last seen about 3 p.m. Jan. 13 at Woodlawn Senior High School, where she was a student. After school she was supposed to pick up her 6-year-old niece and go to work, police said, but she did not do either.Police described Lee as an Asian, 5 feet 8 inches tall, 110 pounds with shoulder-length black hair.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 25, 1996
I have a 6-year-old son in good health who has an interesting problem.For the last year or so, one of his outer ears sometimes becomes very hot to the touch and bright red. This can happen when he is resting, bouncing around or even eating. It doesn't seem to have any pattern, except that it is only one ear at a time. He doesn't have a cold or an ear infection when this happens.Someone said it is blood pressure, so I am concerned. I have asked doctors in the past who brush it off. Please let me know what you think.
FEATURES
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | May 8, 2008
Mother was right. Our shoes are filthy, and we'd be smart to leave them at the door, like they do in Japan. Even microbiologist Charles P. Gerba was surprised to discover what we track into the house on our footwear. "I'm starting to make myself paranoid," he said. "It seems like we step in a lot more poop than I thought." Gerba is a professor in the University of Arizona's Department of Soil, Water and Environmental Science. He's spent years studying how humans spread microbes around and "share" them wherever they go. But when he was asked by the Rockport Co. whether he thought throwing shoes in the washer made hygienic sense, he told them, "I don't know.
FEATURES
By Paige Williams and Paige Williams,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 1, 1998
This article is based on Montana and North Carolina court records, hearing transcripts, interviews, newspaper archives, and Charles Kuralt's books "A Life on the Road," "On the Road With Charles Kuralt" and "Charles Kuralt's America."On his sickbed in New York in the summer of 1997, Charles Kuralt thought of Montana, a place he had loved for a great many years for its natural wonders, far away from his life in the city.Down by a riverside, he built a log cabin. It reminded him of his native North Carolina, but most of all it gave him a place to disappear.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | June 30, 1995
THE ROLAND PARK Second Presbyterian Church looked absolutely stunning last Saturday for the wedding of Natalia Pia Melanie Sommer and Richard Matthew Dohler. Thousands of wildflowers, miles of lace ribbons and tulle, and window sills decorated with Singapore orchids set the stage for the nuptials of the daughter of pop music star Donna Summer and her first husband, Helmut Sommer,and the son of Dick and Bonna Dohler, he's an Ellicott City builder.The church was filled with the music of German trumpeteer Langston Fitzgerald and selections of Bach, Beethoven and Vivaldi, played by the church's music director Margaret Budd on the organ.
NEWS
By Aaron Epstein and Aaron Epstein,Knight-Ridder News Service | May 16, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The hearts of many Americans would fibrillate if they received the jolt from the tax assessor that President Bush just got.Mr. Bush disclosed that the property assessment on his vacation home in Kennebunkport, Maine, soared nearly 2 1/2 times -- to $2,196,000 this year, from $892,000 in 1990."
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | August 9, 1996
The Washington Bullets may have to wait indefinitely for arbitrators to decide whether they have a legitimate claim to Juwan Howard after extensive pressure by NBA attorneys failed to get the Miami Heat to renounce its disputed contract with the All-Star forward."
NEWS
April 22, 1998
Matthew C. Wichita, 21, sporting goods workerMatthew Christopher Wichita died Thursday after he and two friends were attacked at a Florida beach. The Columbia resident was 21.According to reports, Mr. Wichita and his friends protected young women being harassed by several men. Those men returned and, according to police, killed Mr. Wichita and another man and critically injured a third."
NEWS
By Howard Goodman and Howard Goodman,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 21, 1998
PHILADELPHIA -- It was 1951 when the father of Retin-A first came to Holmesburg Prison.The 1,200 inmates of Philadelphia's gloomiest jail were plagued by an outbreak of athlete's foot, and the prison pharamacist had asked Dr. Albert M. Kligman, a University of Pennsylvania dermatologist, to take a look.Imagine the researcher's thrill as he stepped into the aging prison, hundreds of men milling around."All I saw before me were acres of skin," Kligman told a newspaper reporter in 1966. "It was like a farmer seeing a field for the first time."
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | April 18, 2007
In the art of Africa, the mask is a versatile, multipurpose facade. It may signify identity and the ancestors, politics and medicine or the invisible world of the spirits. And in whatever form a mask appears, color is integral to its meaning. Now color is the subject of the second installment of Meditations on African Art, a three-part series at the Baltimore Museum of Art that explores African art from the point of view of the people who created it. The modestly scaled show presents about 30 traditional African masks from the museum's collection arranged in four groups: red, white, black and the tricolor that incorporates all three hues.
NEWS
By Joe Stumpe and Joe Stumpe,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 6, 2005
Sometimes only roast beef will do. You know the kind of roast we're talking about - seasoned crust, big beefy flavor and juicy center. Not a fancy steak you can cut with a butter knife, or a pot roast braised until it's falling apart, but an honest piece of meat with flavor and texture. The problem is how to achieve this ideal roast. All too often, roast beef turns out as tough, dry, stringy and flavorless as the proverbial shoe leather. In fact, I'm convinced that's why roast beef seems to turn up on a lot fewer tables these days.
NEWS
By KELLY OVERTON | June 23, 2006
The pharmaceutical industry and the National Institutes of Health spend billions of dollars annually on medical research techniques that have been rendered obsolete by technological advances. Adult stem cell research is key to our status as the world's leader in medical research. The continued use of animals to test the effectiveness of medications and health interventions for humans is akin to using smoke signals instead of e-mail as a method of communication. Animal testing has never really worked.
FEATURES
By David Robb and David Robb,THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER | June 19, 1996
A federal judge in Los Angeles dealt a potentially stunning blow to Hollywood's system of "creative accounting" Monday as he certified a lawsuit over "JFK" that was filed by the estate of Jim Garrison as a class-action suit.If U.S. District Court Judge Robert Takasugi's ruling is upheld on appeal, the case is certain to become the mother of all Hollywood lawsuits, allowing thousands of actors, writers, directors and producers who feel they've been cheated out of net profits from motion pictures to join the plaintiffs as members of the aggrieved class.
NEWS
By ERNEST F. IMHOFF | June 20, 1993
Drip. Drip. Drip. The Evening Sun droplets of discontent continue.Marcia Rubin, of Randallstown, gets her news from TV in the morning, works during the day and relaxes at night with The Evening Sun. She switched when The News American died in 1986. One recent day she was off. The paper came at 10:20 a.m. ''That's crazy. . . . What good is that?''Della Shanahan, of Pasadena, says, ''I liked The Evening Sun better when it was a newspaper. I like Dan Rodricks and the editorial pages, but forget it for the latest news.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | April 17, 1998
Sharon Fenick first heard the figure of speech "rule of thumb" cited as a sexist pejorative during her freshman year at Harvard seven years ago.The phrase was invoked in a lecture as an example of domestic abuse permitted by British common law. The rule of thumb, according to the professor, was a law that allowed a man to beat his wife so long as the rod used was no thicker than his thumb. But over the centuries, the term had evolved into vernacular for an "approximate measure.""It sounded very believable to me," says the 24-year-old Fenick, now in her third year of law school at the University of Chicago.
Advertisement
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.