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Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

FEATURES
By Paige Williams and Paige Williams,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 1, 1998
This article is based on Montana and North Carolina court records, hearing transcripts, interviews, newspaper archives, and Charles Kuralt's books "A Life on the Road," "On the Road With Charles Kuralt" and "Charles Kuralt's America."On his sickbed in New York in the summer of 1997, Charles Kuralt thought of Montana, a place he had loved for a great many years for its natural wonders, far away from his life in the city.Down by a riverside, he built a log cabin. It reminded him of his native North Carolina, but most of all it gave him a place to disappear.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | April 27, 1992
All the movie-maker had to do was tell the story as Babe Ruth lived it. Fiction wasn't needed because his accomplishments on the field, and off, set him apart. A singular identity. There was never anyone to compare to the "Babe", the title of the latest film that takes enormous liberties with the facts. Historians deserve to be indignant.We never knew the "Babe" and that's our loss. His wife, Claire, we interviewed on three occasions. She was filled-up with her importance and for no other reason than she was married to probably the most talented and colorful athlete the world has known.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | April 6, 1994
AUGUSTA, Ga. -- Standing in awe of Augusta National Golf Club and its intrinsic splendor, while waiting in anticipation of another Masters Championship, gives reason to pause and consider what this green and glorious venue may have looked like a half-century ago during the perilous days of World War II.Augusta National, as with the rest of America, underwent emergency change. It shut down. Totally. Well, almost.In 1942, only four months after the start of the war, the course was closed for the duration.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Staff | November 23, 1997
The accidental author rests in the warmth of a crusty red Ford parked off Park Heights Avenue. The day is nameless and timeless. There is nowhere to go, nothing really to do. Then, old men in older folding chairs tell Leon he's got a visitor.Susan Roth, a white, middle-aged artist from Guilford, is looking for Leon Walter Tillage, a black, 61-year-old custodian from Park Heights. They know each other. In fact, Roth knows Tillage's life story.Using his "fancy" cane, Tillage takes baby steps toward Roth's white Toyota.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | June 21, 1992
To eat the crab mustard, or not to eat the crab mustard, that was the question.Recently I struggled with this uncertainty. I pondered which parts of the crab I wanted to eat, and which parts I didn't.I didn't think about it too long. A half-dozen soft crabs, soon to be known as supper, were sitting on the kitchen counter. It was my job to clean them, to prepare them for cooking by snipping off unwanted parts.I removed the underside of the crab called its apron. I opened it up and removed the gills or "devil's fingers."
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN ARTS WRITER | February 28, 2002
The question, as it always is, is this: What about the bear? At Baltimore's Center Stage, it gallumphs into view, roaring and huffing, a great, blue manifestation of what must be Shakespeare's most bizarre stage direction. Blue? Yes, blue. "Exit, pursued by a bear," instructed Shakespeare in Act III, Scene 3 of The Winter's Tale. What was the Bard thinking? Did he intend for a real bear - or perhaps a man in a costume - to appear on stage? Should it be scary or amusing? Was the playwright who would become the most revered writer in the English language toying with the directors of his day, or toying with us?
FEATURES
By New York Daily News | March 3, 1991
The bionic babe created in an operating orgy is writing a self-help manual on how to be fit and fetching? Isn't that a little like Tammy Faye Bakker exalting the virtues of natural beauty?No fair, cries Cher. She knows the press and public write off her sinewy slinkiness as medical editing, but "I've killed myself in the gym to have this body. It isn't like I have some amazing secret that nobody else has. And when I don't want to exercise, I look like hell. It's not anything you'd want to see."
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | July 4, 1992
Installing ductwork for heating and air conditioning is a bit like putting together a huge three-dimensional jigsaw puzzle.The basic rules of the game, however, are the same, whether you're retrofitting an older house, working with new construction, or adding heating and air conditioning to a new room, attic or basement.Basic Rule No. 1: Hot air rises, cold air falls.Ducts should be installed to take maximum advantage of natural air movement. For instance, for air conditioning to work properly, air returns, the large ducts that carry air back to the central unit, need to be installed high up on the wall of each upper floor, to capture warmer air and return it for cooling.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
College athletic coaches continue to dominate the upper ranks of Maryland's public salary structure, with University of Maryland men's basketball coach Mark Turgeon, football coach Randy Edsall and women's basketball coach Brenda Frese ranking as the state's three highest-paid employees. The Baltimore Sun updated its salary database with 2013 data on Wednesday. Beyond those big three, football and basketball coaches rank among the highest-paid employees at other state universities such as Towson, Morgan State and Coppin State.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | June 2, 1998
NEW YORK -- He was Secretariat's best friend.But when Eddie Sweat died in April at age 59, he was destitute. His family couldn't afford to bury him.So a charitable organization paid for the funeral. And a former employer paid for Sweat's widow and two daughters to travel from their home in New York City to Sweat's home state of South Carolina.There, on April 24, a group primarily of relatives -- no one from Secretariat's inner circle was present -- gathered at Rock Hill A.M.E. Church in Vance, S.C., to bid farewell to Edward "Shorty" Sweat.
SPORTS
By Bob Raissman and Bob Raissman,New York Daily News | July 12, 1991
NEW YORK -- Cynthia Alzado knows what people will think. They will call her a vengeful ex-wife.She doesn't care.The sun was shining on the tiny back yard of her Cedarhurst, Long Island, condominium Wednesday as her mood swung from regret to relief to rage. She had known Lyle Alzado since she was a teen-ager and classmate at Lawrence High School. They had lived together for 3 1/2 years before marrying in 1985.The relationship and 15-month marriage was carried out in the fast lane. It was filled with violence.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2013
John Merzbacher, a former South Baltimore parochial school teacher convicted of raping a student, will remain in prison after the U.S. 4th Circuit Court of Appeals reversed a decision Friday that could have set him free. In an emotional victory for the former students named in civil lawsuits and identified by prosecutors as his victims, the court ruled that Merzbacher is not entitled to a plea deal that his lawyers argued should have been offered to him nearly 20 years ago. "This is a man who held a loaded gun to my head at ages 11 and 12 and 13 and threatened to kill me if I ever told," said Elizabeth Ann Murphy, a former student raped by Merzbacher in the 1970s at Catholic Community Middle School.
NEWS
By Brent Jones, Liz F. Kay and Jill Rosen and Brent Jones, Liz F. Kay and Jill Rosen,brent.jones@baltsun.com | September 16, 2009
Hours earlier, someone had broken into John Pontolillo's house and taken two laptops and a video-game console. Now it was past midnight, and he heard noises coming from the garage out back. The Johns Hopkins University undergraduate didn't run. He didn't call the police. He grabbed his samurai sword. With the 3- to 5-foot-long, razor-sharp weapon in hand, police say, Pontolillo crept toward the noise. He noticed a side door in the garage had been pried open. When a man inside lunged at him, police say, the confrontation was fatal.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2005
To lovers of Wild West folklore, he's Wyatt Earp - lawman, saloonkeeper, gambler, quick-triggered centerpiece of the legendary gunfight at the OK Corral. To Charles Earp Jr. of Catonsville and Pamela Earp Young of Ellicott City, he's cousin Wyatt. That the man who almost single-handedly defines the Wild West would have a couple of relatives in Maryland - and that those relatives would meet by coincidence - is perhaps not as far afield as it might seem. As it turns out, the Earp clan got its start in the United States when Thomas Earp Jr. of Ireland came to the Baltimore area in the 17th century as an indentured servant.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,Sun reporter | January 27, 2008
After sitting through two painful trials for the man accused of shooting his daughter in the head and killing her, Joe Nueslein was relieved. "I just thank God this is all over with," he said that November evening in 1995 when former Baltimore police Sgt. James A. Kulbicki was convicted of first-degree murder for the second time. "And that I'll never have to go through that again." He couldn't have been more wrong. The Nueslein family found themselves back in court last year as a new team of defense attorneys challenged just about every piece of evidence that tied Kulbicki to the killing of Gina Nueslein, 22, a convenience-store clerk with whom the married man had an affair and a child.
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