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Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 13, 1995
BANJA LUKA, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- Croats and Muslims in this Serbian-held city in northern Bosnia are being forcibly evicted from their homes in acts of revenge by some of more than 100,000 Serbian refugees who fled their territory in Croatia last weekend in a rout by Croatian forces, relief officials said yesterday.A Roman Catholic bishop said in an interview here that gangs of armed Serbian refugees had hunted down Croats in Muslim neighborhoods in the city, threatening to kill the occupants if they did not leave immediately.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | June 24, 1994
It's good to be the king.This is the thrust of "The Lion King," the new Disney animated feature film opening today, which wants to be about fathers and sons but can't quite break free of the fact that it's about kings and princes. Although it's state of the art, one might say that in terms of its values, it's the best animated film of the 19th century.Beautifully mounted and dynamically told, it follows Simba, Prince of the Beasts, son of the mighty Mufassa (James Earl Jones), current holder of the kingship.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2012
An online rant by a man whose sister was killed in a car crash in Baltimore went viral this week after he accused Progressive Advanced Insurance Co. of siding with the driver whose car hit his sister's vehicle in June 2010. Matt Fisher's Monday post on tumblr.com sparked international coverage and a barrage of outraged tweets and comments. "If you are insured by Progressive, and they owe you money, they will defend your killer in court in order to not pay you your policy," he wrote.
NEWS
October 6, 2014
In 2013, I retired as the Commander of the Maryland State Police Licensing Division. Before that, I ran the Maryland State Police Firearms Enforcement Section and the Gang Enforcement Unit. I was also a homicide investigator, drug investigator and criminal investigator for most of my career. I understand crime and I understand violence. I strongly support efforts to reduce violence in the state of Maryland. But the fact is that we are not focusing on real solutions. I can assure you that bad laws do not make us any safer.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | March 12, 1998
Buddy Jeannette, a former Baltimore Bullets player-coach and member of the Basketball Hall of Fame, died yesterday in Nashua, N.H. He was 80.Jeannette had been in ill health and suffered a stroke recently.Harry "Buddy" Jeannette spent nine seasons between 1946 and 1967 in Baltimore as a player, coach and general manager of the Bullets.He played pro basketball in a much different era from today's multimillion-dollar contracts.Jeannette was lured to Baltimore in 1946 by making what was then a large salary demand.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Sun Staff Writer | April 18, 1995
The recuperative powers of the Canadian Football League were called into play last week when it waved off the search for a new home for the Las Vegas Posse.On Friday, for the second time in 11 days, commissioner Larry Smith suspended the franchise and dismissed Jackson, Miss., as a relocation site. Yet, despite his announcement, there was a report in a Calgary, Alberta, newspaper over the weekend about continued efforts to revive the Jackson deal.Based on the CFL's record, it was not hard to imagine.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 14, 2005
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Helen Suzman still gets hate mail. These days it comes mainly from black South Africans, not white defenders of the racist apartheid regime against which she waged a determined and often lonely battle during 36 years in Parliament. "You were just a spy of the Jews," begins the latest letter, an unsigned note that arrived this week alleging Jewish exploitation of the country's majority black population. Suzman, who is sharp of mind and tongue at 87, tossed the letter on a table at her home north of Johannesburg and said such nastiness did not bother her. "I don't frighten easily," she said.
NEWS
By Alireza Jafarzadeh | April 16, 2012
After a yearlong round of escalating international economic sanctions and rhetoric, the regime in Iran has finally come around to raising expectations that it will take some constructive steps in reining in its nuclear weapons ambitions. But this cycle of threat and accommodation has played out before, and its outcome should have been predictable. According to the information provided by Iranian dissidents obtained from their sources inside the regime, as well as the U.N.'s atomic watchdog agency, the nuclear genie is out of the bottle in Iran, and the regime's genius for delay and subterfuge will only give it the time to complete the dash to a workable weapon.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff Writer | August 14, 1992
A Severna Park man was convicted of manslaughter yesterday in the shooting death of Tiffany Smith, the 6-year-old bystander who became a symbol of the indiscriminate gunplay plaguing the city.In refusing a prosecutor's plea to return a guilty verdict for first-degree murder, the Baltimore Circuit Court jury ruled Guy Bernard Wilson, 21, was provoked into the July 9, 1991, shootout on a West Baltimore street.Tiffany's mother, Charlene Miller, was not happy with the verdict. "I don't think justice was done," she said.
SPORTS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff Writer | April 14, 1994
They haven't worn Orioles uniforms for years. But what are they doing today? Get updated on the lives of former stars of Baltimore baseball. Today: the man who pitched the Orioles' first home opener, Bob Turley.To look at his Marco Island, Fla., home with the marble columns and the ersatz Michelangelo ceiling paintings, one might take Bob Turley for a 1994 major-league pitcher, a seven-figure-salary man with a vicious slider and an equally effective agent. One never would know that the year he entered Orioles history he made $9,000.
FEATURES
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Staff Writer | February 5, 1993
Here's the deal:Some 2,400 masters of transcendental meditation fly into Baltimore, check into a hotel at the harbor and start to meditate, each morning and evening.Within weeks, muggers begin to lose the urge to mug. Months pass, and robbers forswear robbery. A year or two, and drug dealers are staying off the corners. Within five years, crime has been -- not reduced. Eliminated."With its cities free from crime," say newspaper advertisements for the American City Project, placed over the last four months in 60 urban centers, "the United States will radiate a powerful positive, harmonious, and nourishing influence for the whole world."
NEWS
By Jules Witcover and Jules Witcover,Staff Writer | March 14, 1992
DEARBORN, Mich. -- President Bush and Republican challenger Patrick J. Buchanan came about as close to each other as they're likely to get in the 1992 campaign season yesterday as Mr. Bush defended his anti-recession package before the Economic Club of Detroit and Mr. Buchanan criticized it at a news conference nearby.Mr. Buchanan, at the Ritz Carlton hotel, repeated his appeal for a face-to-face debate with the president. But Mr. Bush, at the Fairlane Manor down the road, continued to spurn the idea, preferring to tell a friendly business audience that his recovery program would help the sagging U.S. auto industry.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,sun reporter | June 26, 2007
When JCPenney purchased the old Woodward & Lothrop store in Columbia, it wanted to add shelves and displays to showcase the new wares to shoppers as they glided between floors. But the death of a store clerk who could not breathe after her head became wedged between the escalator's moving handrail and the new display, has her family convinced that the designers were negligent. Andrea Albright, a 24-year-old single mother, was riding the up escalator at the Penney store in The Mall in Columbia on June 15, 2002.
SPORTS
By Drake Witham | November 7, 1995
The Cleveland Browns are the only team in the NFL named after a person, but there's some confusion as to who that person is.Call the Cleveland Plain Dealer sports department and you'll be told Paul Brown. The Official NFL Encyclopedia of Pro Football also credits the legendary first coach and general manager of the team. But according to the media relations office of the Browns, the team is named after the "Brown Bomber," boxer Joe Louis.About the only thing that seems certain is that there was a contest to name Arthur McBride's professional football team in 1946.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2012
Baltimore's top cop warned Tuesday against "race-baiting" amid rising tensions across the nation, citing the Trayvon Martin case and cautioning that a video generating outrage on the Internet of a tourist being beaten and stripped in downtown Baltimore does not appear to depict a hate crime. Police CommissionerFrederick H. Bealefeld III, appearing on WBAL's "The C4 Show," said the attack on a 31-year-old white man from Arlington, Va., appears to be nothing beyond "drunken opportunistic criminality.
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