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Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | August 25, 1996
Richard Nicolas' daughter was 2 years old, but they had never spent even a minute alone together. A Friday night outing at Golden Ring Mall would be the first time. He would take Aja to an 8 o'clock movie, "The Adventures of Pinocchio," and return her to her mother. At the last minute, when her mother wavered about letting her go, Aja was insistent."Want to see Pinocchio!" the toddler said. "Want to see Pinocchio!"They saw the movie, but that night, July 26, would be father and daughter's last together.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | April 9, 1992
Arthur Ashe, dying of AIDS, says he wished to live out his final years keeping his secret to himself. But he says questioning from a newspaper reporter forced him to announce his disease to the whole wide world.If a reporter forced his hand, then God save all of us in journalism from ourselves."I have AIDS," Ashe declared yesterday afternoon, trying in vain to keep his emotions in check. "I am sorry that I have been forced to make this revelation now, at this time. There is no good reason for this to happen now, but it has happened."
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | June 21, 1992
To eat the crab mustard, or not to eat the crab mustard, that was the question.Recently I struggled with this uncertainty. I pondered which parts of the crab I wanted to eat, and which parts I didn't.I didn't think about it too long. A half-dozen soft crabs, soon to be known as supper, were sitting on the kitchen counter. It was my job to clean them, to prepare them for cooking by snipping off unwanted parts.I removed the underside of the crab called its apron. I opened it up and removed the gills or "devil's fingers."
NEWS
By Freeman A. Hrabowski III | December 22, 2013
A recent New York Times illustration read, "COLLEGE IS FOR SUCKERS. " The words were emblazoned across the sweatshirts of four students, and the accompanying article made essentially that point. It echoed an increasingly common refrain that college is expensive, that students are taking on unmanageable debt and that they too often graduate unprepared for the world of work. In contrast, many economists and educators point to data showing that the fastest growing job categories require at least a college degree.
TRAVEL
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2011
We asked the experts, from biologists to tackle shop owners, to name the best places for crabbing in Maryland. Here are the Top 10 places we heard about: Point Lookout, Route 5, St. Mary's County Solomons Island fishing pier, Route 2, Calvert County Kings Landing Park , off Route 4, Calvert County Matapeake State Park , Route 8, Kent Island Romancoke Pier, Route 8, south end of Kent Island Bill...
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Robert A. Erlandson and Joe Nawrozki and Robert A. Erlandson,Sun Staff Writers | June 19, 1994
An article in The Sun June 19 about the unsolved murder of Sister Catherine Ann Cesnik reported that during the investigation of her disappearance on Nov. 7, 1969, Inspector Julian I. Forrest Sr., chief of detectives, had pressured investigators on behalf of the Archdiocese of Baltimore.In fact, Mr. Forrest had retired in October 1966.Col. Edwin E. Taylor, who was chief of the criminal investigation division when Sister Catherine disappeared, retired Dec. 25, 1969, just before her body was found Jan. 3, 1970, in Lansdowne.
NEWS
By Lon Wagner and Lon Wagner,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 15, 2003
NORFOLK, Va. -- Shortly after Nat Turner led a slave revolt that killed nearly 60 white Southside residents in 1831, his head was chopped off and carted away for study. His captors hoped that it would offer clues to his motives and to what many thought to be the Southampton County man's exceptional intelligence. But the answers never came. Turner's skull disappeared somewhere along the way, creating another twist in the story of a man who was either a ruthless murderer or a courageous liberator.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2014
For the second time in her life, Grace Leto will have to bury a child. In 1983, she said, her 18-year-old daughter was killed in a car accident in Baltimore. On Friday, another daughter, Kimberly Leto, 51, was stabbed to death after she happened upon two teenagers attempting to burglarize her home, Baltimore police said. "She was a very vibrant, wonderful woman," Grace Leto, 78, said by phone. "I can't really talk about it. " Baltimore District Judge Rachel E. Cogen on Monday called Leto's murder "a tragedy … on all accounts" as she ordered suspects Alonzo Gorham-Ramos, 14, and Allen Pinkney, 16, held pending further developments in the case.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 11, 2005
SANTA MARIA, Calif. - Michael Jackson, dressed in purple paisley pajama bottoms and looking more spectral than ever, listened yesterday in obvious distress to more than four hours of damaging testimony from the boy who has accused Jackson of sexually molesting him. In a dramatic start to a tense day, Jackson arrived in court more than an hour late, disheveled, limping and heavily medicated after what his lawyers said was a fall early yesterday morning that...
FEATURES
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Evening Sun Staff | November 13, 1990
WHAT DOES it mean when you hear that a dear friend has had a heart attack and is in the hospital in critical condition? Just how bad is critical? You might call the hospital the next day and be told his condition is stable. Does that mean he is out of danger now?Perhaps you read about an accident on I-95 in which three local teen-agers are hurt. The paper says one of the passengers was hospitalized in critical condition. The next day you read that the teen's condition is guarded. Does that mean he is getting better or worse?
SPORTS
By Drake Witham | November 7, 1995
The Cleveland Browns are the only team in the NFL named after a person, but there's some confusion as to who that person is.Call the Cleveland Plain Dealer sports department and you'll be told Paul Brown. The Official NFL Encyclopedia of Pro Football also credits the legendary first coach and general manager of the team. But according to the media relations office of the Browns, the team is named after the "Brown Bomber," boxer Joe Louis.About the only thing that seems certain is that there was a contest to name Arthur McBride's professional football team in 1946.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber Mike Littwin of The Sun's sports staff contributed to this article | December 16, 1990
It's called The Box, a sweltering, dimly lit gymnasium with a hard-court floor smudged dark brown, two half-moon-shaped backboards and four brick walls.This is where David Wingate began a basketball journey, reaching each step on a path that stretched from the Cecil-Kirk Recreation Center in East Baltimore, to Dunbar High School, to Georgetown University, to the National Basketball Association.In September, Wingate was on the verge of securing his financial future, coming within 48 hours of signing a three-year,$2.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | May 8, 1994
The last solar eclipse to cross the continental United States until 2012 will cast its shadow over Maryland Tuesday.The celestial spectacular -- called an "annular," or "ring," eclipse -- has a handful of scientists mobilizing for a battery of observations, while vision specialists are warning the public against trying to watch it directly.In Baltimore, the eclipse will be partial. At 1:28 p.m., more than 80 percent of the sun will be obscured by the moon, creating an odd sort of midday twilight if skies are clear.
NEWS
By Rick Bragg and Rick Bragg,New York Times News Service | March 11, 1995
MONTGOMERY, Ala. -- The marchers came to the old man in the wheelchair, some to tell him he was forgiven, some to whisper that he could never be forgiven, not now, not a million years from now.Yet to all of the people who retraced the steps of the Selma-to-Montgomery civil rights march 30 years ago, George C. Wallace offered an apology for a doomed ideal.The former Alabama governor, whose name became shorthand for much of the worst of white Southern opposition to the civil rights movement, held hands with men and women he had once held down with the power of his office.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2005
To lovers of Wild West folklore, he's Wyatt Earp - lawman, saloonkeeper, gambler, quick-triggered centerpiece of the legendary gunfight at the OK Corral. To Charles Earp Jr. of Catonsville and Pamela Earp Young of Ellicott City, he's cousin Wyatt. That the man who almost single-handedly defines the Wild West would have a couple of relatives in Maryland - and that those relatives would meet by coincidence - is perhaps not as far afield as it might seem. As it turns out, the Earp clan got its start in the United States when Thomas Earp Jr. of Ireland came to the Baltimore area in the 17th century as an indentured servant.
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