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Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2014
Putting too much stress on your joints? Or maybe arthritis has become an issue? Athletes, seniors or anyone in these categories could develop a bone spur, or extra bone produced by the body. There are some things to do at home if it causes short-term pain, and a doctor can offer suggestions if the pain doesn't stop, according to Dr. James Nace, an orthopedic surgeon with the LifeBridge Health Rubin Institute for Advanced Orthopedics and a physical therapist. What is a bone spur, and why does it form?
SPORTS
By Dan Shaughnessy and Dan Shaughnessy,Boston Globe | February 16, 1993
Boston's winter of 1948 was bitterly cold. Slugger Ted Williams went south to fish. On Jan. 28, while Ted was fishing in Florida, Doris Williams gave birth to a daughter, Barbara Joyce Williams. The baby was early. Ted was late.The Globe's Harold Kaese wrote, "Everyone knows where Moses was when the lights went out. And apparently everybody knows where Ted Williams was when his baby was born Tuesday. He was fishing."In his biography, "My Turn at Bat," Williams wrote, "Well, Bobby Jo was the most important thing in my life from the moment she was born . . . but I sure wasn't going to apologize for something that didn't concern anybody but Doris and me."
NEWS
By Joe Stumpe and Joe Stumpe,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 6, 2005
Sometimes only roast beef will do. You know the kind of roast we're talking about - seasoned crust, big beefy flavor and juicy center. Not a fancy steak you can cut with a butter knife, or a pot roast braised until it's falling apart, but an honest piece of meat with flavor and texture. The problem is how to achieve this ideal roast. All too often, roast beef turns out as tough, dry, stringy and flavorless as the proverbial shoe leather. In fact, I'm convinced that's why roast beef seems to turn up on a lot fewer tables these days.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Sun Staff Writer | November 27, 1994
If you were writing in Denise Koch's baby book, on the page marked "Mom, Six Months' Pregnant (with twins!)," the entry would read:Dear Meg and Wynn,Your Mom is walking gingerly these days, tiptoeing around the house in shimmery gold ballet slippers like some plump fairy godmother.She's gained 19 pounds -- from eating muffins, hamburgers and ice cream mostly -- and her round form now pokes out beneath her purple blouse.But it's her face -- that angular, elegantly made-up anchorwoman face -- that shows how she feels about your arrival.
BUSINESS
March 20, 2005
Q. I am 55 years old and thinking about retiring in a year or two. Would my early retirement affect how much I receive from Social Security after I elect to take regular benefits at age 65? - B.S.K., Chicago A. Based on the way Social Security benefits are calculated and paid, you and many others should carefully reconsider your decision to retire early. Here's why. The monthly benefits you receive from Social Security depend on your average earnings over the best 35 years in your work history.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | April 18, 2007
In the art of Africa, the mask is a versatile, multipurpose facade. It may signify identity and the ancestors, politics and medicine or the invisible world of the spirits. And in whatever form a mask appears, color is integral to its meaning. Now color is the subject of the second installment of Meditations on African Art, a three-part series at the Baltimore Museum of Art that explores African art from the point of view of the people who created it. The modestly scaled show presents about 30 traditional African masks from the museum's collection arranged in four groups: red, white, black and the tricolor that incorporates all three hues.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | March 15, 1992
SMYRNA, Del. -- When the end drew near, Steven Brian Pennell had it better in some ways than the survivors of the women he was convicted of torturing and killing.Pennell, whose death by lethal injection at 9:49 a.m. yesterday marked Delaware's return to capital punishment after a 46-year hiatus, got about everything he asked for.When he wanted his steak cooked medium rare, he got it. When he wanted to read, he got books. When he wanted to write letters, he got stationery. When he wanted to smoke, he got cigarettes.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | June 2, 1998
NEW YORK -- He was Secretariat's best friend.But when Eddie Sweat died in April at age 59, he was destitute. His family couldn't afford to bury him.So a charitable organization paid for the funeral. And a former employer paid for Sweat's widow and two daughters to travel from their home in New York City to Sweat's home state of South Carolina.There, on April 24, a group primarily of relatives -- no one from Secretariat's inner circle was present -- gathered at Rock Hill A.M.E. Church in Vance, S.C., to bid farewell to Edward "Shorty" Sweat.
FEATURES
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Evening Sun Staff | November 13, 1990
WHAT DOES it mean when you hear that a dear friend has had a heart attack and is in the hospital in critical condition? Just how bad is critical? You might call the hospital the next day and be told his condition is stable. Does that mean he is out of danger now?Perhaps you read about an accident on I-95 in which three local teen-agers are hurt. The paper says one of the passengers was hospitalized in critical condition. The next day you read that the teen's condition is guarded. Does that mean he is getting better or worse?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2010
By his own calculations, David Rubenstein, the Baltimore-born businessman and philanthropist, has just a couple of short decades left to make his mark on the planet. "I'm 60 now," Rubenstein says." "I'm running out of time. The average white man my age can expect to live to age 81, and before I die, I'd like to make an impact on the world. I'd like to have been truly transformative in at least one area." The sense of urgency is striking, if somewhat puzzling. Rubenstein is the son of a postal carrier and homemaker who grew up in a blue-collar enclave in Northwest Baltimore.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Staff Writer | May 18, 1993
Rejecting an "evil twin" defense, an angry Baltimore County judge gave the supposedly "good" twin life without parole yesterday for murdering a 15-year-old runaway last June after the brothers raped and sodomized her."You are a dangerous human being," Circuit Judge James T. Smith Jr. told Tyrone Page, 36, at times raising his voice and pounding to emphasize his points.Page and his identical twin brother, Jerome, lived off and on with their mother in the 2100 block of Monumental Ave. in Halethorpe, not far from the victim's home in the 2000 block of Putnam Ave.Amanda Lee Hall, a 10th-grader at Lansdowne High School, ran away from home last June 1, after a dispute over a boyfriend.
NEWS
By Imre Karacs | August 1, 1999
GERMANS are at odds over claims that harsh potty training is to blame both for Nazism and modern thuggery.A friend of mine is convinced that the German national character in all its complexities can be traced back to Germans' rigorous potty training.Teutonic infants, he claims, are made to sit on their lowly thrones for hours on end, until pronounced spiffy clean, usually at a remarkably tender age.Out of this early purgatory of life emerges a nation of precision engineers obsessed with waste disposal, with an unquenchable yearning for order and authority.
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | September 21, 1996
Before gangsta raps there were raps about libraries and teen-age pregnancy; before Dannemora State Prison and the killing bullets, there were pillow fights and the exuberance of youth.Tupac Amaru Shakur did not grow up in Baltimore. He was not a finished product when he left. But his years here encompassed that crucial time when childhood ends and self-discovery begins.He was 14 when he and his mother moved here from the Bronx in 1985. He called himself MC New York and won a rap contest sponsored by the Enoch Pratt Free Library.
NEWS
By MARY BETH REGAN and MARY BETH REGAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 28, 2006
My child has been complaining of ankle and foot pain. I talked briefly with a friend who is a physical therapist. Could it be his shoes? It could be your child's shoes. But then, it could be something more serious. Kevin Crowley, a physical therapist and manager of Towson Sports Medicine Center, says any time a child is complaining of reoccurring pain, you should consult your physician. "As physical therapists," Crowley says, "we really can't diagnose patients. We help implement the treatment."
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and michael.dresser@baltsun.com | December 1, 2008
Avoiding the purgatory that is Interstate 95 on a holiday weekend is not all that difficult if you're heading from Baltimore to the Northeast. Pennsylvania offers a wide choice of routes to scoot to the west of Philadelphia and invade New Jersey. Going south is more difficult.There aren't that many great options when you're heading to Richmond or beyond at peak travel times. The obvious route is to take the Capital Beltway to the Woodrow Wilson Bridge and follow I-95 south.
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