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Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

NEWS
By Peter Honey and Peter Honey,Washington Bureau | January 17, 1993
Three days from the presidency, Bill Clinton confronts a worl already more perilous than the one that brought him victory less than 11 weeks ago. Old enemies are up to new tricks in the Middle East; the passing of the Cold War has raised a flurry of regional conflicts around the world. Meanwhile the economy continues to confound with conflicting signs of recovery and slide, and the deficit continues to grow. Mr. Clinton faces myriad challenges. But here are 10 widely viewed as the toughest, what he said about them during the campaign and the outlook for solution:1.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington | kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | January 25, 2010
When patients are in the throes of a heart attack, there's no question that stents save lives. But for heart patients with few symptoms and less than severe artery blockage, whether to use a stent is a question with no clear-cut answer, say cardiologists. In fact, these days some heart experts say the mesh metal tubes used to keep narrowed or weakened arteries propped open are overused for blockages that can be treated just as well with medicine, a healthy diet and exercise. A recent internal review of heart patients at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson found 369 patients received the coronary implants unnecessarily.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | June 21, 1992
To eat the crab mustard, or not to eat the crab mustard, that was the question.Recently I struggled with this uncertainty. I pondered which parts of the crab I wanted to eat, and which parts I didn't.I didn't think about it too long. A half-dozen soft crabs, soon to be known as supper, were sitting on the kitchen counter. It was my job to clean them, to prepare them for cooking by snipping off unwanted parts.I removed the underside of the crab called its apron. I opened it up and removed the gills or "devil's fingers."
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 1, 2005
How long do the fatigue and "brain fog" last after general anesthesia for surgery? It depends - on your age, the specific drugs used, how long the surgery took and how healthy you were to start with. These days, most general anesthesia is short-acting, which means you wake up quickly and the drugs are mostly out of your system within a few hours, said Dr. Carl Rosow, an anesthesiologist at Massachusetts General Hospital. But tiny amounts can linger for up to seven days - enough so that you may not feel completely normal, especially if you also have a drink or two. Moreover, if you are one of the unlucky 20 percent to 40 percent of patients who have nausea and vomiting after general anesthesia, that can add considerably to your recovery time because of dehydration and weakness from not eating, said Dr. John Ulatowski, director and chair of the department of anesthesia and critical care at Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Gerard Shields and Peter Hermann and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2000
Baltimore Police Commissioner Ronald L. Daniel abruptly agreed yesterday to resign after holding office just 57 days, ending a contentious reign in which he refused to back the mayor's plan to fight crime. The 26-year veteran will meet with top police officials today to officially announce his departure, which took even his closest aides by surprise. Sources said Deputy Commissioner Edward T. Norris will be named acting chief. "Ron Daniel and I both share a commitment to make Baltimore a safer place," Mayor Martin O'Malley said in a statement.
NEWS
By Howard Goodman and Howard Goodman,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 21, 1998
PHILADELPHIA -- It was 1951 when the father of Retin-A first came to Holmesburg Prison.The 1,200 inmates of Philadelphia's gloomiest jail were plagued by an outbreak of athlete's foot, and the prison pharamacist had asked Dr. Albert M. Kligman, a University of Pennsylvania dermatologist, to take a look.Imagine the researcher's thrill as he stepped into the aging prison, hundreds of men milling around."All I saw before me were acres of skin," Kligman told a newspaper reporter in 1966. "It was like a farmer seeing a field for the first time."
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 25, 1996
I have a 6-year-old son in good health who has an interesting problem.For the last year or so, one of his outer ears sometimes becomes very hot to the touch and bright red. This can happen when he is resting, bouncing around or even eating. It doesn't seem to have any pattern, except that it is only one ear at a time. He doesn't have a cold or an ear infection when this happens.Someone said it is blood pressure, so I am concerned. I have asked doctors in the past who brush it off. Please let me know what you think.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | April 18, 2007
In the art of Africa, the mask is a versatile, multipurpose facade. It may signify identity and the ancestors, politics and medicine or the invisible world of the spirits. And in whatever form a mask appears, color is integral to its meaning. Now color is the subject of the second installment of Meditations on African Art, a three-part series at the Baltimore Museum of Art that explores African art from the point of view of the people who created it. The modestly scaled show presents about 30 traditional African masks from the museum's collection arranged in four groups: red, white, black and the tricolor that incorporates all three hues.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2010
By his own calculations, David Rubenstein, the Baltimore-born businessman and philanthropist, has just a couple of short decades left to make his mark on the planet. "I'm 60 now," Rubenstein says." "I'm running out of time. The average white man my age can expect to live to age 81, and before I die, I'd like to make an impact on the world. I'd like to have been truly transformative in at least one area." The sense of urgency is striking, if somewhat puzzling. Rubenstein is the son of a postal carrier and homemaker who grew up in a blue-collar enclave in Northwest Baltimore.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | June 7, 2000
A 19-year-old honors student convicted of strangling his girlfriend and burying her in a shallow grave because she broke up with him was sentenced in Baltimore Circuit Court yesterday to spend the rest of his life behind bars. Adnan Masud Syed maintained his innocence at his sentencing on first-degree murder and kidnapping convictions, even as his attorney asked Judge Wanda K. Heard for mercy when punishing Syed because the killing was "a crime of passion." "He made a bad decision," Syed's attorney, Charles H. Dorsey III, told Heard.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Staff Writer | April 2, 1993
A 15-year-old runaway was so afraid that someone might be lurking near her makeshift bed outside a restroom at a Halethorpe recreation center last June that she asked a virtual stranger to inspect the place."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 27, 1993
MANILA, Philippines -- Pepsi's advertisements, splashed for weeks all over Philippine newspapers, radio and TV, were hardly subtle: "Today, you could be a millionaire!"From her tin-roofed shack in one of Manila's more squalid slums, Victoria Angelo couldn't resist. The unemployed mother of five and her husband, Juanito, who pedals people in a three-wheeled cab for about $4 a day, began drinking Pepsi with every meal and snack. Each morning, the family prayed for a specially marked bottle cap.And then, a miracle!
SPORTS
By Jackie MacMullan and Jackie MacMullan,Boston Globe | March 31, 1991
It was never a matter of memorizing dead spots on the parquet or the way the lip of the south rim bent ever so slightly. The lighting? Nothing out of the ordinary, Andrew Toney reports. In fact, said the former Philadelphia 76ers guard, the only thing special about the creaky court on 150 Causeway Street was that it served as the stage for his most famous role: the Boston Strangler."My first step out of the locker room, I was in range," Toney says. "It was easy. I have no explanation for it. It was just easy for me to score at Boston Garden."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2011
After hundreds of local and federal police fanned out across Baltimore at dawn yesterday, hauling suspects out of homes and off the streets, authorities announced at day's end that they had shut down one of the city's major sources of illicit drugs and violence. In all, they charged 63 suspects with federal and state drug conspiracy counts — among them Felicia "Snoop" Pearson, whose arrest on heroin-related and aiding and abetting charges echoed the street lifestyle she portrayed as a character in HBO's series "The Wire" and sought to overcome in her personal life.
FEATURES
By Sloane Brown, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2010
For many folks headed to Preakness, the focus of the afternoon isn't the race. It's the fashion — and we don't just mean hats. If you're in the grandstands, the Jockey Club area or Corporate Village, you'll want to dress the part. Betsy Dugan, owner of Bettina Collections in Cross Keys and former co-owner of Octavia in Pikesville, has been dressing women for Preakness for years. "This is the time ... to dress up," she said. If there's one rule of thumb, it's that ladies and gentlemen at Preakness should look like ...well, ladies and gentlemen.
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