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Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN ARTS WRITER | February 28, 2002
The question, as it always is, is this: What about the bear? At Baltimore's Center Stage, it gallumphs into view, roaring and huffing, a great, blue manifestation of what must be Shakespeare's most bizarre stage direction. Blue? Yes, blue. "Exit, pursued by a bear," instructed Shakespeare in Act III, Scene 3 of The Winter's Tale. What was the Bard thinking? Did he intend for a real bear - or perhaps a man in a costume - to appear on stage? Should it be scary or amusing? Was the playwright who would become the most revered writer in the English language toying with the directors of his day, or toying with us?
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | May 31, 2008
Comedian Lonnie Shorr, who would go on to appear on the Merv Griffin, Dean Martin and Tonight shows, was bitten by the acting bug while a 1950s City College student. He made his Baltimore debut when he landed a role in the student play Remains to be Seen, presented on his high school's 33rd Street stage. "I was always the class clown," he said. He was born in 1939 in Zebulon, N.C., and he likes to tell his audiences where he came from. "It's just a word and it's funnier than Baltimore.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff | August 26, 1996
You can see fall coming as surely as you can see a candle flame snuffed by the wind. At twilight, watch any grass field or woods where this summer's fireflies, nourished by a wet spring, rose in great numbers. Now their dwindling lights tell us autumn is on the way.Think of it as the lightning bugs' parting signal in a brief life of signals.Seven days on the planet between June and mid-August, that's about all the adult lightning bug has in temperate zones. Time for the males to rise from the ground at twilight or night, fly through the darkness flashing, looking for a mate.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | December 5, 1999
At least three people have been killed on Maryland highways since Friday evening, including a Virginia man who was thrown from his car and struck by another driver on Interstate 95 in Prince George's County, police reported.The other fatal accidents happened in Howard and Carroll counties.About 2: 30 a.m. yesterday, two men were traveling south on I-95 near Route 5 when the driver lost control of the 1985 Nissan 300 2X, Maryland State Police said. The car flipped, tossing the driver and passenger onto the highway.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | November 27, 2010
Everyone loves the smell of piping-hot pizza. But no one loves the smell of a burning pizza box. Turns out, this is a difficult scent to eradicate from the home, and I've tried — even frying tilapia for dinner one evening. But the scent of flaming cardboard somehow persists. Almost all of my friends use the oven, set very low, to keep their pizzas warm in the box while they wait for their guests to arrive, for the evening news to be over or for the salad to be made. No one I know has encountered a problem with this.
TRAVEL
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2011
We asked the experts, from biologists to tackle shop owners, to name the best places for crabbing in Maryland. Here are the Top 10 places we heard about: Point Lookout, Route 5, St. Mary's County Solomons Island fishing pier, Route 2, Calvert County Kings Landing Park , off Route 4, Calvert County Matapeake State Park , Route 8, Kent Island Romancoke Pier, Route 8, south end of Kent Island Bill...
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | November 30, 2001
Calling his crime "diabolical," a Howard County judge sentenced Paul Stephen Riggins, the Elkridge man convicted of killing his long-missing wife, to life in prison yesterday. Before imposing the sentence and with crying friends of Nancy Lee Riggins huddled on courtroom benches, Judge Lenore R. Gelfman noted that the killing left the couple's only child, Amanda, who turns 11 tomorrow, without either parent - and friends and family without a grave to visit. "The family has no place to mourn, no sense of closure," she said.
FEATURES
By Paige Williams and Paige Williams,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 1, 1998
This article is based on Montana and North Carolina court records, hearing transcripts, interviews, newspaper archives, and Charles Kuralt's books "A Life on the Road," "On the Road With Charles Kuralt" and "Charles Kuralt's America."On his sickbed in New York in the summer of 1997, Charles Kuralt thought of Montana, a place he had loved for a great many years for its natural wonders, far away from his life in the city.Down by a riverside, he built a log cabin. It reminded him of his native North Carolina, but most of all it gave him a place to disappear.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and michael.dresser@baltsun.com | December 1, 2008
Avoiding the purgatory that is Interstate 95 on a holiday weekend is not all that difficult if you're heading from Baltimore to the Northeast. Pennsylvania offers a wide choice of routes to scoot to the west of Philadelphia and invade New Jersey. Going south is more difficult.There aren't that many great options when you're heading to Richmond or beyond at peak travel times. The obvious route is to take the Capital Beltway to the Woodrow Wilson Bridge and follow I-95 south.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | January 9, 2011
The aiding and abetting of the pedophile priest and fugitive, Laurence Brett, continued long after his days at Calvert Hall College in Towson, and it wasn't monsignors and bishops who gave him cover. Even in exile in the Caribbean, this old abuser — described by the newspaper that hunted him down as "a predator blessed with charm" — got some help from friends, including at least two other priests, as well as a Maryland businessman and a Baltimore psychologist. Father Larry, as he was known, seduced teenage boys, but he apparently could get grown men to do things for him, too. Mr. Brett, who reportedly died on the island of Martinique on Christmas Eve, merits Top 10 standing among the most notorious American figures in the Catholic Church's gone-global priest-abuse scandal.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,jill.rosen@baltsun.com | June 28, 2009
We would have remembered him if it was just the songwriting or just the dancing or just the eyebrow-raising fashion. But Michael Jackson dominated each of those artistic avenues - and so many others. You see his influence in every Justin Timberlake who sweats to perfect a signature move. Every movie-esque flourish in a video. Every African-American artist who sits atop the pop charts. His legacy is as enduring as it is multi-faceted. 1. Sound When America first met Jackson, he was a lovable, pint-sized pre-teen with a puffy Afro and an electric voice.
NEWS
By Imre Karacs | August 1, 1999
GERMANS are at odds over claims that harsh potty training is to blame both for Nazism and modern thuggery.A friend of mine is convinced that the German national character in all its complexities can be traced back to Germans' rigorous potty training.Teutonic infants, he claims, are made to sit on their lowly thrones for hours on end, until pronounced spiffy clean, usually at a remarkably tender age.Out of this early purgatory of life emerges a nation of precision engineers obsessed with waste disposal, with an unquenchable yearning for order and authority.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2003
Local motocross phenom Travis Pastrana has built a multimillion-dollar career around gravity-defying stunts and impossible speeds. Now the 19-year-old faces thousands of dollars in reckless driving fines and, he said, deep regret for his role in a crash last month that left a friend unable to walk. Standing in a large motorbike garage on his property in Davidsonville yesterday, Pastrana said that he is reluctant to get behind the wheel of another car -- at least outside the racetrack.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | June 21, 1992
To eat the crab mustard, or not to eat the crab mustard, that was the question.Recently I struggled with this uncertainty. I pondered which parts of the crab I wanted to eat, and which parts I didn't.I didn't think about it too long. A half-dozen soft crabs, soon to be known as supper, were sitting on the kitchen counter. It was my job to clean them, to prepare them for cooking by snipping off unwanted parts.I removed the underside of the crab called its apron. I opened it up and removed the gills or "devil's fingers."
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 1, 2005
How long do the fatigue and "brain fog" last after general anesthesia for surgery? It depends - on your age, the specific drugs used, how long the surgery took and how healthy you were to start with. These days, most general anesthesia is short-acting, which means you wake up quickly and the drugs are mostly out of your system within a few hours, said Dr. Carl Rosow, an anesthesiologist at Massachusetts General Hospital. But tiny amounts can linger for up to seven days - enough so that you may not feel completely normal, especially if you also have a drink or two. Moreover, if you are one of the unlucky 20 percent to 40 percent of patients who have nausea and vomiting after general anesthesia, that can add considerably to your recovery time because of dehydration and weakness from not eating, said Dr. John Ulatowski, director and chair of the department of anesthesia and critical care at Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions.
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