Maryland receiver Stefon Diggs says he is '110 percent'

Diggs broke his right fibula in October

(Jerry Lai, USA Today Sports )
July 28, 2014|By Matt Zenitz | Baltimore Sun Media Group

CHICAGO -- Stefon Diggs has typically been out on the practice field with Maryland quarterback C.J. Brown at least once a week leading up to preseason practice.

He has been running routes, stretching his legs and continuing to work his way back from the broken his right fibula that ended his season just seven games into last year.

And while the leg may have prevented him from taking part in the majority of spring practice, the junior wide receiver said Monday at the Big Ten media days that it's no longer an issue.

"I'm 110 percent," Diggs said.

Diggs said he actually feels faster than he did prior to the injury. “They say when you break your leg you get a little taller and a little faster, and I got both, I think,” he said.

Diggs' game is built on speed and athleticism. He ranked eighth nationally in all-purpose yards as a freshman in 2012 and had 34 catches for 587 yards and three touchdowns last season before suffering the injury Oct. 19 at Wake Forest.

Brown said Monday that Diggs is “definitely back to his old Stefon. If not, he’s better.”

One of the Terps' new rivals went a step further. 

“Diggs is one of the best players in the country in my opinion,” Ohio State coach Urban Meyer said.

Maryland coach Randy Edsall said Diggs has worked without any limitations during summer workouts and that he will be a full participant when preseason practice starts next week.

“I see a guy that’s very driven,” Edsall said. “I see a guy that’s put in a lot of hard work. Very focused on what he wants to do for his team this year. I’ve seen that this summer. I think he’s really excited about the opportunities, and he’s worked hard.”

mzenitz@tribune.com
twitter.com/mzenitz

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