Throwback Thursday, the top 10 songs this week in 1976 [Videos]

June 26, 2014|By Jordan Bartel | The Baltimore Sun

As America was prepping for its big bicentennial, here are the songs that were likely blasted at every July Fourth barbecue, via Billboard's Hot 100 chart archive.

10. "Got to Get You into My Life," the Beatles

No, your eyes aren't decieving you. Though this song was first released in 1966, it charted 10 years later as part of the compilation album, "Rock 'n' Roll Music," which also featured tracks such as "Drive My Car," "Get Back" and "Revolution."

9. "Sara Smile," Hall & Oates

Thus began the Hall & Oates domination. "Sara Smile" was the duo's first top 10 hit.

8. "Love Is Alive," Gary Wright

Also known as Wright's follow-up to "Dream Weaver" that wasn't as good. But to be fair, is anything as good as "Dream Weaver"?

7. "Misty Blue," Dorothy Moore

Nothing like a good slow jam to ring in America's 200th birthday. Bob Montgomery, who penned this track in 1966, was also the songwriting partner/friend of Buddy Holly.

6. "Silly Love Songs," Wings

Paul McCartney's other band was doing OK, too.

5. "More, More, More," Andrea True Connection

Our favorite disco song (or any song) sung by a porn star, "More, More, More" had something of a resurgence in 1999, when the group Len sampled it in their song "Steal My Sunshine."

4. "Shop Around," Captain & Tennille

R.I.P. Captain & Tennille. Not the people, but the relationship. The pair announced this year that they are divorcing, which challenges the old adage, "The couple who covers Smokey Robinson songs together, stays together."

3. "I'll Be Good to You," the Brothers Johnson

Sometimes, America likes to get a little bit funky.

2. "Kiss and Say Goodbye," the Manhattans

The best spoken-word opening to a song ever? Discuss.

1. "Afternoon Delight," Starland Vocal Band

Yes, it's about what you think it is. By the way, did you know John Denver discovered them? I didn't until I watched this video.

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