Density may increase for mixed-use development in Coldspring

September 27, 2012|By Steve Kilar | The Baltimore Sun

The developer of a five-acre, mixed-use development at the southwest corner of the intersection of West Cold Spring Lane and Interstate 83 is considering adding a fifth floor of residential units to the project.

"A transit-oriented development should have a lot of density," said Judy Siegel, chair of the Linthicum-based Landex Companies, after a presentation to Baltimore's Urban Design and Architectural Review Panel on Thursday. It was the second time that early-stage plans for the development, at 2001 W. Cold Spring Lane, were shown to the panel.

Panelist Gary Bowden suggested increasing the height of the two residential towers because the "town center" style development will be easily accessible by public transportation, making it a desirable location for apartment dwellers.

The development is expected to have 200 parking spaces dedicated to people using the Cold Spring Light Rail station. Pedestrian and bike connections to the station are also planned. Plus, there are two bus stops nearby.

As it now stands, the development incorporates 30,000 square feet of retail on the ground level of two buildings and 250 apartments on four floors atop the commercial space. The two towers will be connected by a several-story bridge of apartments.

In addition to the parking spots for Light Rail users, there will be about 530 more spots for shoppers and residents, said Cassandra Gottlieb, the project's architect.

Construction of the development is not expected to begin until the end of 2013, Siegel said.

The panel also reviewed plans Thursday for a new recreation center in Cherry Hill, on the site of the Patapsco Recreation Center on Roundview Road. It is one of three new recreation centers that Baltimore's Department of Recreation and Parks plans to build.

Have a real estate news tip or experience to share? Email me at steve.kilar@baltsun.com.

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