Police make second arrest in videotaped beating

Two more suspects sought, authorities say

  • Shayona Mikia Davis, 20, was arrested on charges that include armed robbery and assault.
Shayona Mikia Davis, 20, was arrested on charges that include… (Baltimore Sun )
April 23, 2012|By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun

Police have arrested a second suspect in the videotaped beating in March of a man in downtown Baltimore, charging her with using a high-heeled shoe in the attack and slapping the victim after he had been knocked unconscious.

Authorities are still looking for two other people in the assault on the 31-year-old visitor from Virginia who was stripped of his clothes and left unconscious and naked on North Calvert Street in front of the city courthouse.

The graphic video, which was posted on the Internet, has horrified police and residents alike because of its brutal images and what appears to be an unprovoked attack on a man who told police he was intoxicated and was trying to find his Mount Vernon hotel.

After finally making it back to his room, he called police but could not remember any details other than that his iPhone, $1,300 watch and Audi car key were missing. Police didn't link that report to the assault until the video was posted on the Internet.

The victim is identified in court documents as Sephy Bounan of Alexandria, Va. He declined to comment when reached Monday, and referred questions to Lee Jacobson, a Towson attorney. Jacobson said he is the family's longtime lawyer.

Earlier this month, police arrested the man who allegedly threw the punch that decked Bounan. The man, Aaron Jacob Parsons, 20, is a party promoter from Rosedale. He is being held on $500,000 bail on charges of assault and robbery.

Authorities announced Monday the arrest of Shayona Mikia Davis, 20, on charges that include armed robbery and assault. She was being held on $750,000 bail. Also Monday, police said they are seeking Deangelo Carter, 18, and Shatia Baldwin, 21, both of Baltimore; each is charged in warrants with assault and robbery.

Authorities identified Davis, who lives in the 5200 block of Wilton Heights Ave. in Northwest Baltimore, as the woman seen in the video gyrating against the victim and then slapping him across the face after he had been knocked to the ground. Police said the alleged use of a high-heeled shoe in the attack prompted more severe charges of armed robbery for Davis.

Members of social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter helped track down suspects by examining Internet postings.

In charging documents, police said they compared a driver's license photo of Parsons to the video, saying it "positively identifies him as the suspect." The video does not say where it was shot, but landmarks that include a white stone building, a bench and a mailbox place the location in front of the Baltimore courthouse in the 100 block of N. Calvert St.

The victim told police that he left Power Plant Live about 2 a.m. and was walking back to the Mount Vernon Hotel on West Franklin Street.

Court documents follow events depicted in the video — a woman dancing and rubbing against the victim as another woman yelled, "Let's get his car keys."

In the video, a man in a white T-shirt says, "I'm 'bout to take his money. yo," and reaches into the victim's pocket. Another man says, "Take that … watch." The victim grabs the man's hand, then backs away as the man punches him in the face.

"The victim immediately falls backward hitting his head against the ground," the court documents say. "The victim appears to be dazed or unconscious for a few seconds. As the victim was lying on the ground, a group of people surrounded the victim beating, kicking, and removing his personal items along with his clothing."

Police said the victim made his way back to his hotel about 6 a.m. with a black left eye and bruises on his forehead, left hand, elbow and right hip.

peter.hermann@baltsun.com

  • Text NEWS to 70701 to get Baltimore Sun local news text alerts
  • Baltimore Sun Articles
    |
    |
    |
    Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.