Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close reviews

January 21, 2012|By Dave Rosenthal

Jonathan Safran Foer has been a favorite author of mine since I read "Everything is Illuminated" for my book club. So I'm interested to see the adaptation of "Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close," his take on the destruction of the World Trade Center, as seen through a young boy's eyes. Here are some excerpts from reviews:

Los Angeles Times: "Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close" is a handsomely polished, thoughtfully wrapped Hollywood production about the national tragedy of9/11 that seems to have forever redefined words like unthinkable, unforgivable, catastrophic.

NewYor Times: In truth, “Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close” isn’t about Sept. 11. It’s about the impulse to drain that day of its specificity and turn it into yet another wellspring of generic emotions: sadness, loneliness, happiness. This is how kitsch works. It exploits familiar images, be they puppies or babies — or, as in the case of this movie, the twin towers — and tries to make us feel good, even virtuous, simply about feeling. And, yes, you may cry, but when tears are milked as they are here, the truer response should be rage.

Roger Ebert: There must be a more plausible story to be told about a boy who lost his father on 9/11. This plot is contrivance and folderol. The mysterious key, the silent old man and the magical tambourine are the stuff of fairy tales, and the notion of a boy walking all over New York is so preposterous we're constantly aware of it as a storytelling device. The events of 9/11 have left indelible scars. They cannot be healed in such a simplistic way.

 

 

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.