North County News Briefs

July 25, 2011

Brian Boston, chef at the Milton Inn in Sparks, and Larry Wilhelm, owner and president of Friendly Farm Restaurant in Upperco, were recognized by Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz on June 27 for their achievements in Maryland's restaurant industry. 

Brian Boston, chef at the Milton Inn in Sparks, and Larry Wilhelm, owner and president of Friendly Farm Restaurant in Upperco, were recognized by Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz on June 27 for their achievements in Maryland's restaurant industry. 

In May, the Restaurant Association of Maryland held its 57th annual Stars of the Industry Awards. Boston was named Chef of the Year. Wilhelm received the Brice and Shirley Phillips Lifetime Industry Achievement Award, named for the founders of Phillips Seafood Restaurant. It is awarded to a person who exemplifies sound business principles and impeccable character.

 

By Pat van den Beemt

 

'Willy Wonka, Jr.' next up for summer drama program

Seventh District Recreation Council's summer drama program will present "Willie Wonka, Jr." on Friday, July 29 and Saturday, July 30 at Hereford High School's auditorium.

The production features 42 local children ages 8 through 16. The kids have been creating the stage sets and props, as well as making their own costumes during the two-week camp that began July 18. They also have daily singing practice, acting classes and choreography lessons, said Diana Woltereck, the program director.

The drama program also performed "Alice in Wonderland" during its first session, which ended July 15.

"Willie Wonka, Jr." runs two hours and refreshments are available during intermission.

Show times are 7:30 p.m. on July 29, and 6 p.m. on July 30. Tickets in advance are available at Hereford Recreation Office, 410-887-1938.

Hereford High School is located at 17301 York Road.

 

By Pat van den Beemt

 

Cardiologist's license revoked over stent accusations

The Maryland Board of Physicians last week revoked the medical license of Dr. Mark Midei, saying the Towson cardiologist falsified patient records to justify unnecessary cardiac stent procedures.

"Dr. Midei's violations were repeated and serious," board members wrote in an 11-page order. "They unnecessarily exposed his patients to the risk of harm. They increased the cost of the patients' medical care."

The findings cap two years of inquiry into Midei's work atSt. Joseph Medical Center.

The allegations tarnished Midei's career, pushed the hospital to enter into a multimillion-dollar settlement with the federal government and led the U.S. Senate Finance Committee to open an investigation into the doctor's relationship with stent makers.

The revocation "validates what we've been saying all along, which is that Dr. Midei was engaged in egregious malpractice and fraud," said Andrew Slutkin, a Baltimore attorney who has filed nearly 20 patient lawsuits against Midei.

One of Midei's attorneys, Stephen Snyder, said "political pressure" to revoke Midei's license was too great for the board to ignore.

The board ruled Midei violated five provisions of the state's Medical Practice Act while working at St. Joseph through unprofessional conduct, false reports, overutilization of health care services, standards of care violations and failure to keep adequate medical records.

Specifically, the board found he inserted cardiac stents into arteries that weren't clogged enough to need them — likely because of "pressure to produce."

"Dr. Midei testified that he understood that he was a big generator of business for the hospital, that the hospital had lost many patients to competition and that its goal was to hold onto the stent business that it saw slipping away," board members wrote, noting that Midei was hired to run St. Joseph's cardiac catheterization lab at a seven-figure salary that was triple his prior earnings.

Snyder said the board's decision was not "supported by the evidence."

"Unfortunately, I think a fine doctor is being put out to pasture and that the community receives a disservice by him not being able to continue to save lives," Snyder said.

He said he will discuss an appeal with Midei.

Midei has filed a lawsuit against St. Joseph, claiming he was made a scapegoat by hospital administrators who were trying to deflect attention from a kickback scandal. St. Joseph paid the federal government $22 million to settle the kickback claims, as well as to repay Medicare funds received for some of Midei's stents.

In a statement, the hospital said it respects the board's decision on Midei.

Midei can reapply for his license in two years.

 

— Tricia Bishop, Baltimore Sun

 

Students entering new school in fall urged to register early

Parents or guardians who must register children for the 2011-12 school year should do so as soon as possible.

Students must be registered if they are:

•enrolling for the first time in a Baltimore County school.

• recently moved to Baltimore County from another county.

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