John Lynch, computer specialist

He had been an Air Force pilot

  • John W. Lynch
John W. Lynch
May 31, 2011|By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun

John Warner Lynch, who had been a Social Security Administration computer specialist and an Air Force pilot, died May 22 of cancer at his Sparks home. He was 63.

The son of a banker and an artist, Mr. Lynch was born in Baltimore and raised in Pikesville and Lutherville.

He was a 1965 graduate of Calvert Hall College High School and earned a bachelor's degree in business from the University of Maryland, College Park.

He enlisted in the Air Force and completed pilot training in 1970. He was stationed at Mather Air Force Base in California, where he flew B-52 bombers.

A motorcycle accident left him a paraplegic, and he was discharged from the Air Force with the rank of lieutenant.

He returned to Baltimore and earned a master's degree in business from the University of Baltimore in 1977.

Mr. Lynch went to work that year for the old Maryland National Bank, where he worked in securities. In 1980, he joined the SSA in Woodlawn as a computer specialist. He retired in 2005.

He was a ham radio operator and after retiring from the Air Force became an active member of the Civil Air Patrol, flying patrol planes on weekends and during the summer, said his wife of 32 years, the former Gwen Myers.

"He flew them until 2004, when they got rid of the plane he flew with hand controls," said Mrs. Lynch. She said he had appeared on the old "Today Show" with host Dave Garroway in the 1970s as the nation's first noncommercial disabled pilot.

"John was a Webelos leader and even camped in the mud. John did everything but walk," said Mrs. Lynch.

Mr. Lynch was a fourth-degree Knight of Columbus and a member of Our Lady of Grace Roman Catholic Church in Parkton, where a Mass of Christian burial was offered Thursday.

In addition to his wife, Mr. Lynch is survived by a son, Wayne Lynch of Chester, Va.; a stepdaughter, Melody Parks of Millersville; a brother, Richard Brook Lynch of Ellicott City; and five grandchildren.

—Frederick N. Rasmussen

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