Council appoints redistricting commission, hears craft fair rule complaints

Recommendations on district boundaries due July 1

March 07, 2011|By Raven L. Hill, The Baltimore Sun

Appointments to the Baltimore County Councilmanic Redistricting Commission were announced Monday.

Edward W. Crizer Jr., a member of the county Board of Appeals, will serve as the commission chair. The other members are James A. Gillis, a former special assistant to the county executive who works in the county state's attorney's office; Robert E. Latshaw Jr., a member of the county Planning Board and president of Latshaw Real Estate Advisors; Anne C. Neal, president of Neal Consulting Inc.; and Ralph W. Wright, a real estate agent with Long & Foster.

The commission will assess the population data from the 2010 census, hold public hearings and make recommendations to the County Council for redistricting by July 1.

Council Chairman John Olszewski Sr. said the group — the first of its kind in the county — will "give the council a perspective from a diverse group."

The commission's recommendations are nonbinding.

Olszewski said he expects changes to district boundaries. His district, which includes Dundalk and Edgemere, was the only one to lose population.

"We'll come up with something that is as palatable as possible for as many members as possible," he said.

In other developments, the council voted unanimously Monday night to increase the graffiti fine from $500 to $1,000, bringing it in line with state penalties, and authorized a resolution supporting County Executive Kevin Kamenetz's proposal to create a tax-friendly enterprise zone in Woodlawn near Interstate 695 and Dogwood Road.

In addition, more than a dozen parents and community leaders spoke against a county school board policy that bars outside vendors from holding craft fairs and other fundraisers in local schools. Several council members have previously called for a reversal of the board's policy.

raven.hill@baltsun.com

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