This is why I won't move back to Baltimore

March 01, 2011

I was born and raised in Baltimore, and while I know you prefer to hear from locals, I thought you might be interested in hearing from someone who no longer lives there, but had been considering returning.

After returning home from a six-year tour in the Navy, I went to the University of Maryland, graduated with a degree in nuclear engineering and, unable to find a job in Maryland, took a position in North Carolina. I have lived in many states, both East and West, during my naval and civilian life and therefore I have a broad basis from which to compare various attributes of an area. Now nearing retirement, I looked forward to returning to the city and state I loved, and to being near family and old friends.

I have been following The Sun for years, but based on what I read, I have reconsidered. The city and state no longer reflect my views and principles. The crime, the taxes, the one-party liberal agenda, the housing and other costs, the traffic, and the overall quality-of-life issues there are making the city and surrounding counties unlivable.

Considering all the problems facing the area, it is sad what issues dominate the local news: changing the name of Negro Mountain; in-state tuition for illegal immigrants; what statues of famous Marylanders should stand in the U.S. Capitol, and so on. Given the politics of the city and state, this is not unexpected.

I am the type of person Baltimore and Maryland should want to relocate back home. I am single, have adult children, am financially independent, pay my taxes and am not a criminal - in short, I would be an asset to the community.

Instead, I will be moving to the Eastern Shore of Virginia or Southern Delaware. This saddens me, as the city and state in which I grew up used to be a great place to live. But it is now gone, and I have no reason to believe it will get better, only worse.

Stan Schultheis

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