Orioles sign reliever Jeremy Accardo

Righty pitched in just five games for Blue Jays last season

December 14, 2010|By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun

Looking for bullpen help after trading four relievers, including three from their 40-man roster last week, the Orioles have signed right-hander Jeremy Accardo to a one-year, $1.08 million deal, according to an industry source.

Accardo, 28, pitched in just five games with the Toronto Blue Jays in 2010, compiling a 0-1 record and 8.10 ERA in 6 2/3 big league innings. In fact, he spent most of the past two seasons at Triple-A Las Vegas, where he was the closer, saving 37 games in two years.

He was buried within the Blue Jays organization after dealing with an injury early in 2008, but was the big league team's closer in 2007, saving 30 games and posting a 2.14 ERA in 64 games for the Blue Jays.

Assuming more personnel is not added, Accardo is expected to join right-handed short reliever Jim Johnson and lefty Mike Gonzalez in setting up Koji Uehara, who officially signed a one-year, $3 million deal with the Orioles on Tuesday.

The club continues to seek relief help and has made an offer to former Blue Jays closer Kevin Gregg, among others. The team would like to add at least one more left-hander to the bullpen as well. Accardo's physical has not been scheduled.

Toronto non-tendered Accardo this offseason, allowing him to become a free agent for the first time in his career. He is, however, under club control for two years, so the Orioles could go to arbitration with him at the end of 2011 and keep him through 2012, if they so desire.

"Jeremy was excited this offseason for the first time to have a chance to choose his employer," said Accardo's agent, Damon Lapa of All Bases Covered Sports Management. "He embraces the chance to start fresh with a new organization and he was very much impressed with the Orioles and their management."

dan.connolly@baltsun.com

twitter.com/danconnollysun

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