Jay Hancock's Blog: Md. gets D+ in corporate-welfare disclosure

December 09, 2010|By Jay Hancock, The Baltimore Sun

From Jay Hancock's Blog:

Good Jobs First, which has been tracking and inveighing against dumb corporate welfare since the 1990s, has a new report on how well states disclose the details of economic development subsidies. If states are going to create a double-standard taxation system -- one for the suckers who pay sticker price, another for the companies that can wheedle tax discounts and subsidies out of the pols -- the least states can do is disclose what they're doing. Most of them don't. At least not very well.

Maryland did poorly, getting a D+, but that's not unusual. (Good Jobs First graded on a kind of reverse curve, refusing to give credit for subpar performance.) For example, Maryland has no online portal to disclose recipients of Enterprise Zone tax credits, the report said. However, Maryland did disclose details of financing made through its Maryland Economic Development Assistance Authority Fund, the report said.

Maryland does a much poorer job disclosing details of economic development incentives than it did disclosing details of stimulus spending, said Greg LeRoy, executive director of Good Jobs First, a nonprofit based in Washington.

"Despite winning both of our recovery act competitions, reporting on federal money, Maryland is very much in the middle of the pack when it comes to reporting on its own money," LeRoy said.

Good Jobs First, which has been tracking and inveighing against dumb corporate welfare since the 1990s, has a new report on how well states disclose the details of economic development subsidies. If states are going to create a double-standard taxation system -- one for the suckers who pay sticker price, another for the companies that can wheedle tax discounts and subsidies out of the pols -- the least states can do is disclose what they're doing. Most of them don't. At least not very well.

Maryland did poorly, getting a D+, but that's not unusual. (Good Jobs First graded on a kind of reverse curve, refusing to give credit for subpar performance.) For example, Maryland has no online portal to disclose recipients of Enterprise Zone tax credits, the report said. However, Maryland did disclose details of financing made through its Maryland Economic Development Assistance Authority Fund, the report said.

Maryland does a much poorer job disclosing details of economic development incentives than it did disclosing details of stimulus spending, said Greg LeRoy, executive director of Good Jobs First, a nonprofit based in Washington.

"Despite winning both of our recovery act competitions, reporting on federal money, Maryland is very much in the middle of the pack when it comes to reporting on its own money," LeRoy said.

Good Jobs First, which has been tracking and inveighing against dumb corporate welfare since the 1990s, has a new report on how well states disclose the details of economic development subsidies. If states are going to create a double-standard taxation system -- one for the suckers who pay sticker price, another for the companies that can wheedle tax discounts and subsidies out of the pols -- the least states can do is disclose what they're doing. Most of them don't. At least not very well.

Maryland did poorly, getting a D+, but that's not unusual. (Good Jobs First graded on a kind of reverse curve, refusing to give credit for subpar performance.) For example, Maryland has no online portal to disclose recipients of Enterprise Zone tax credits, the report said. However, Maryland did disclose details of financing made through its Maryland Economic Development Assistance Authority Fund, the report said.

Maryland does a much poorer job disclosing details of economic development incentives than it did disclosing details of stimulus spending, said Greg LeRoy, executive director of Good Jobs First, a nonprofit based in Washington.

"Despite winning both of our recovery act competitions, reporting on federal money, Maryland is very much in the middle of the pack when it comes to reporting on its own money," LeRoy said.

jay.hancock@baltsun.com

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