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Dick Irwin, and his police blotter, depart

Irwin reported on Baltimore crime for 44 years

September 13, 2010|By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun

It's neighborhood gossip in print, or fodder for gossip yet to come. You learn not only that the woman down the street got held up at gunpoint, but that she had $300 in her purse, or that the man shot on Charles Street hailed a cab instead of taking an ambulance to the hospital.

Perhaps most amazing is that the Police Blotter has survived the test of the computer age. Despite electronic feeds in which thousands of crimes can be downloaded from police 911 centers directly to detailed mapping programs, Irwin's feature remains popular, whether it is read at the coffee table, viewed on the computer screen or downloaded to an iPhone (which, by the way, is among the leading items listed in the blotter as stolen).

The computer gives us: "Incident number: 090055470; Report number: n/a; Date/Time: February 07th, 2009 03:10 pm; Description: Assault; Nearby address: 3300 Laurel Fort Meade Rd."

Irwin gives us: "Someone entered the rear yard of a house in the 5900 block of Johnson St. on Saturday morning and removed a tomato from a tomato plant. The tomato was valued at $3, police said."

Here is one last favorite sent to me by a colleague:

North Point Precinct

Burglary/arrest: A woman reported someone had entered her apartment in the 200 block of Baltimore Ave. on Sunday night and stole a 13-inch television that she would recognize because it was infested with roaches. Near the woman's home that night, police arrested a man in connection with the burglary and recovered the TV — which police confirmed had the insects. Charged with the Baltimore Avenue burglary and another in the 2400 block of Keyway later that evening was Edward S. Renick Jr., 22, of no fixed address.

peter.hermann@baltsun.com

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