City police officers shoot, wound teen in traffic stop

Suspect being treated at Baltimore County hospital

August 14, 2010|By Paul West, The Baltimore Sun

A 19-year-old man was shot three times by Baltimore police after a traffic stop early Saturday near Gwynns Falls Park, police said.

According to police, two officers from the Southwestern District were approaching the vehicle in the 1000 block of Ellamont Ave. about 1:30 a.m. to question three men when a passenger in the rear seat pulled out a gun. Both officers fired several shots at the vehicle in response, striking it as it sped away, police said.

The officers did not chase the vehicle but put out a description across local law-enforcement frequencies, police said.

About an hour later, an occupant of the car sought treatment for a gunshot wound at Northwest Hospital Center in Randallstown. Police say the teenager is one of the three individuals involved in the incident.

A .40-caliber shell casing, consistent with ammunition used by police, was found in his clothing, which forensics is now studying, police spokesman Anthony J. Guglielmi said.

The teen won't be identified unless he is charged; the police are "working very closely with the state's attorney's office," and it will probably take some time, Guglielmi said.

The teen, whose injuries were described as not life-threatening, underwent surgery Saturday afternoon.

The officers, who were also not identified, were placed on administrative leave pending an investigation, which is routine in police shootings, police spokesman Jeremy Silbert said. Homicide detectives are investigating the incident as a police-involved shooting.

Guglielmi said both officers are assigned to the patrol division. One was described as a certified field training officer with nine years on the force. The other recently graduated from the police academy.

Baltimore Sun reporter Peter Hermann contributed to this article.

paul.west@baltsun.com

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