Ravens unveil 2 new high-def video screens

'RavensVision' boards will debut at NCAA lacrosse championships

May 27, 2010|By Jamison Hensley, The Baltimore Sun

The Ravens have been working hard on putting the finishing touches on M&T Bank Stadium for this weekend's NCAA lacrosse championships, from lining the fields to putting up banners.

But the biggest addition has been the two new high-definition video screens, which the team has called "RavensVision" boards.

The boards, which will debut at this weekend's NCAA men's lacrosse championships, cost more than $7 million, an expense that was shared by the Ravens and the Maryland Stadium Authority.

"When we decided to switch out the video boards, we committed to the NCAA that we would have it done," Ravens president Dick Cass said a few minutes after the team unveiled the screens at M&T Bank Stadium on Thursday. "It was very important."

It was an aggressive and ambitious four-month project for the Ravens to remove the old boards and replace them with the high-definition ones. Working around snowstorms and other events held at the stadium, the installation was officially completed 10 days ago.

Ravens officials are ecstatic about the results. As a comparison, it would take 600 37-inch flat-screen TVs to equal one board, which measures 24 feet high by 100 feet wide. Like the previous screens, which had become obsolete, these boards sit between the upper and lower decks behind each end zone.

"We think the quality of these pictures will match the best of any high-def TV," said Larry Rosen, the Ravens' vice president of broadcasting. "The visual is stunning."

The number of fans who will see the boards has yet to be determined, especially with no Maryland school in the Division I final four. Cass declined to give the number of tickets already purchased but said "the pacing is a little behind 2007 in terms of all session tickets."

jamison.hensley@baltsun.com

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