Maryland Art Place

April 18, 2010|By Sloane Brown, Special to The Baltimore Sun

Maryland Art Place's annual Out of Order party is not your typical art auction. Any artist may contribute a work of art for a $10 contribution to MAP. That means the collection of guests is as wide-ranging as the art on the walls.

There were artists such as Joyce Scott, Rams Brisueno, and Stanley Waters mingling alongside MAP Executive Director Cathy Byrd and board members Sam Polakoff, Chris Davison, Michel Modell and Patrick Sutton. Other guests included Patrycja Hollis, Alexander Design Studio architect; and Ted Frankel, Sideshow gift shop owner.

"We are thrilled with the turnout," said MAP board President Barbie Hart as she watched more than 300 folks mill around.

"There's a great energy here," said her friend and participating artist, Gay Legg.

For added energy, you didn't have to go farther than the snack table, which featured Slim Jims, bags of chips and penny candy — the perfect complements to the evening's sauvignon blanc and merlot.

"I just look around and think this is the greatest opportunity to buy affordable art," said Karen Schaftel, board member.

"I like the diversity. It's all levels of talent," commented Brian Comes, Tower Federal Credit Union human resources manager, who perused the offerings with Maureen Gold, Ruth Shaw manager.

That wasn't all there was to peruse.

"This is the type of party where you wear the most fabulous and fun outfit you have," said board member Karen Bokram, decked out in a black-and-white spotted ruffle dress and fierce black booties.

However, even she was upstaged by performance artist Carl Stevens.

"I just finished a performance," Stevens said, as he explained his fun outfit: an Elizabethan ruff, striped tights and tutu. "I decided to stay in costume. I think it must be interesting for the average passerby. And after performing in public in a tutu, everything is easy."

Sloane Brown may be contacted at sloane@sloanebrown.com.

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.