Deaths elsewhere

March 16, 2010

CHARLES MOORE, 79

Civil rights-era photographer

The world saw glimpses of the civil rights movement through Charles Moore's eyes: In black-and-white photographs, he captured arresting images of the integration riots at Ole Miss in 1962, the fire hoses in Birmingham in '63, a Ku Klux Klan rally in North Carolina in '65.

The Alabama native recognized the significance of the civil rights movement early on as one of the first photographers to document the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s leadership. Moore is recalled for his striking images of historic and often violent events that led him to get closer to the action than many other photographers would.

Moore died Thursday at age 79, said John Edgley of Edgley Cremation Services in West Palm Beach, Fla.

Moore was working for the Montgomery Advertiser when he began covering the civil rights movement and was the lone photographer at the scene when King was arrested in Montgomery in 1958. One of his images showed two white police officers hustling away King, whose right arm was wrenched behind his back.

Later, while working on a contract basis for Life magazine, Moore traveled across the South to cover some of the most dramatic events of the civil rights movement.

Moore photographed riots at the University of Mississippi that coincided with the enrollment of James Meredith as its first black student. In one, white students hold a Confederate battle flag aloft as they jeer.

- The Associated Press

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