Dixon's Xbox goes on eBay

Prosecutors putting several items up for bid

March 09, 2010|By Julie Scharper and Annie Linskey | Baltimore Sun reporters

Attention political junkies and video game enthusiasts: There's an item for sale online that might pique your interest.

Former Mayor Sheila Dixon's Xbox video game system, which prosecutors said she bought with gift cards meant for the poor, has been listed on the online auction site eBay.

The game system, shown in a photo, is marked with a piece of red evidence tape. It is "used, and seems to be in great condition," according to accompanying text. By Tuesday afternoon, bids for the system had risen to more than $650.

The Xbox was seized from the former mayor's home in 2008 and played a key role in her trial on charges of embezzlement late last year. A jury found her guilty of stealing about $500 worth of gift cards intended for the needy.

Dixon submitted an Alford plea - which means that she did not admit guilt but acknowledged the prosecutors had enough evidence to convict her - on a single count of perjury for not disclosing lavish gifts from a developer ex-boyfriend on city ethics forms. As part of a plea deal, she resigned from office Feb. 4, agreed to perform 500 hours of community service and relinquished several valuable items, including the Xbox, to prosecutors.

State Prosecutor Robert A. Rohrbaugh confirmed that the Xbox belonged to the former mayor and said he plans to post Dixon's two fur coats and a camcorder in the next few days.

On a profile on the auction site, the prosecutor's office is listed as buying "nothing" and selling "Seized Items for sale!"

"We're hoping to get as much as we can for it," Rohrbaugh said of the Xbox. The proceeds will go to Youthworks, a Dixon pet project that provides summer jobs for city children.

The online posting says the game system comes with "one controller and the Need for Speed Carbon disc" and is being sold "as is with no warranty."

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