Ohno's 6th medal sets U.S. mark

OLYMPICS NOTEBOOK BY JOHN CHERWA

February 14, 2010

Apolo Anton Ohno won his sixth career Olympic medal Saturday when he finished second in the men's 1,500 in short-track speedskating. Ohno was lucky to get that as it was looking like a sweep by Korea when two skaters ahead of him tumbled on the final turn, leaving it open for him and third-place finisher J.R. Celsi, also of the U.S. Lee Jung-Su of South Korea won the gold.

The U.S. also advanced two skaters to the Wednesday's finals of the women's 500 meters. Katherine Reutter won the first qualifying heat, and Alyson Dudek was second in her qualifier.

Competing in his third Olympic Games, Ohno's sixth career medal passes Eric Heiden for the most by an American man. Ohno is tied with Bonnie Blair as the most decorated U.S. athlete in Winter Games.

Ski jumping: The first medal of the games went to Swiss ski jumper Simon Ammann in the normal hill competition. It was his third Olympic title, having won both the normal and large hill competition in Salt Lake City in 2002. Adam Malysz of Poland was second, and Gregor Schlierenzauer of Austria finished third. Speedskating: The U.S. did not have high expectations in the men's 5,000, and they met those expectations just four years after Chad Hedrick won gold in Turin. Sven Kramer of the Netherlands was the winner in an Olympic record time of 6 minutes, 14.60 seconds. Hedrick was the highest finishing skater for the U.S. in 11th. Shani Davis, who is expected to content for medals in the shorter races, finished 12th.

Hockey: Sweden beat Switzerland 3-0 in the first game of the women's tournament. Goalie Kim Martin, who helped Sweden upset the U.S. in Turin, made 16 saves. Sweden won the silver in Italy. jcherwa@tribune.com


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