Christopher Lee Boozer, real estate broker

December 30, 2009|By Jacques Kelly

Christopher Lee Boozer, a commercial real estate broker active in the Masonic order and its charities, died of a heart attack Dec. 25 at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Cockeysville resident was 49.

Born in Baltimore and raised in Rodgers Forge, he was a 1979 graduate of Loyola High School at Blakefield, where he remained an active alumnus. He attended the University of Delaware and earned a degree at Salisbury State University. He was a lineman on his schools' football teams.

Mr. Boozer coached football at Princeton University from the mid-1980s and later began selling real estate. He co-founded his own firm, Boozer and Brennan in Towson. He then owned Boozer Real Estate Services and recently headed the commercial division for Keller Williams Excellence in Timonium.

"He had a talent for working with people," said Bob Kimball, chief executive officer at Keller Williams.

A 32nd degree Mason, Mr. Boozer belonged to the Charity Lodge in Hereford and was a director of Court 82, Royal Order of Jesters. He also belonged to the Scottish Rite and the Boumi Temple.

As a Mason, he raised money for hospitals funded by the fraternal order.

"He was very interested in helping children with congenital bone defects in the spine or in bones," said Dr. John Mitcherling, a friend. "He was a devoted family man."

He also coached football and baseball in the Cockeysville Recreation League. He was a member of the Towson Elks Lodge.

A memorial service will be held at 1 p.m. today at the Grand Lodge of the Masonic Home, 300 International Circle in Cockeysville.

Survivors include his wife of 17 years, the former Kathie Malloy; three sons, Cole Boozer, Greyson Boozer and Evan Boozer, all of Cockeysville; his father, Vernon Boozer of Glencoe, who formerly served in the Maryland House of Delegates and Senate; his mother, Nancy Boozer of Towson; and three brothers, Andy Boozer of Pikesville, Doug Boozer of Milton, Del., and Frank V. "Bo" Boozer of Rodgers Forge.

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