Could Fernando Perez become surprise Chicago Cub

Tampa Bay Rays center field could plug hole

December 27, 2009|By Phil Rogers

The Cubs clearly aren't blown away by any of the center fielders on the free agent market, preferring to explore trades. One name to file away is Fernando Perez. Speedy, bright and the holder of a .375 minor league on-base percentage, the Rays switch hitter, 27 in April, would be an interesting gamble complicated because he is recovering from shoulder surgery. Scott Podsednik's ability to lead off keeps him in consideration alongside Marlon Byrd and Rick Ankiel. … As it has for Matt Holliday, the market has remained slow for Jason Bay. He has been sitting on a four-year, $64 million offer from the Mets - who must wonder if he wants to play there - and could be hoping the Red Sox will make an aggressive play to keep him. The Red Sox did not have to pay luxury tax last season but would be beyond the threshold if they added Bay to an outfield already including Mike Cameron, J.D. Drew, Jacoby Ellsbury and Jeremy Hermida. … Jermaine Dye is drawing interest from the Yankees after their acquisition of Javier Vazquez. He had been considered as a first base option in Atlanta before the Braves shifted to Troy Glaus. … The Yankees plan to have Phil Hughes and Joba Chamberlain compete for the fifth starter's spot in spring training, with the loser moving to the bullpen or even to Triple A. They're trying to deal Chad Gaudin and Sergio Mitre. … Fernando Rodney's signing with the Angels continued an ominous exodus from Detroit. The Tigers have lost Placido Polanco, Curtis Granderson, Edwin Jackson, Brandon Lyon and Rodney. They could look at youngsters Ryan Perry and Daniel Schlereth in Rodney's closer role. … White Sox pitching prospect Clevelan Santeliz - a right-hander with Francisco Rodriguez aspirations - continues to pile up impressive outings in Venezuela. He has held hitters to a .195 batting average through 24 2/3 innings out of the bullpen.

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.