Frank A. Sass Jr., FBI agent

November 18, 2009|By Frederick N. Rasmussen

Frank A. Sass Jr., a retired Federal Bureau of Investigation special agent supervisor and longtime Monkton resident, died Nov. 3 from complications after cardiac surgery at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. He was 87.

He was born and raised in Dubuque, Iowa. After graduating from Dubuque High School in 1940, he began his college studies at the University of Dubuque.

He left college in 1942 and joined the Army Air Corps, where he was trained as a flight instructor.

Mr. Sass spent the war years instructing pilots and ferrying B-17 Flying Fortresses and other aircraft, some bullet-ridden from combat, to other U.S. air bases.

After being discharged with the rank of major in 1945, he completed his college education at the University of Dubuque in 1946.

He began his FBI career in 1947, and worked in field offices in Baltimore; Newark, N.J.; New Orleans and Cleveland, where he was police training coordinator.

At the time of his 1976 retirement, he was special agent supervisor instructor in the behavioral science unit, which he helped establish at Quantico, Va.

From 1976 to 1982, Mr. Sass lectured and taught privately while working as an investigator for the Medicaid Fraud Control Unit of the Maryland attorney general's office.

Mr. Sass then worked for Blue Cross Blue Shield of Maryland's Special Investigations Unit for eight years until retiring in 1990.

Since 1979, Mr. Sass lived on a family farm in Monkton with his wife of 60 years, the former Carolyn Mays, whom he met while working in the FBI's Baltimore field office.

He enjoyed working on his property and spending summers at a second home on Pelican Lake in Wisconsin.

Mr. Sass was a communicant of Immanuel Episcopal Church in Glencoe, where services were held Nov. 7.

In addition to his wife, Mr. Sass is survived by a son, John Sass of Monkton; two daughters, Karen Sass of Novato, Calif., and Susan Bessa of Lake Villa, Ill.; and two grandchildren.

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